Courses Linked to the Advocate LLC

2020-2021

Please note: Each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details). All Advocate LLC courses will have an LLC Hour attached to the course from 7 to 8 p.m. on Mondays.

ANTH 101: Introduction to Biological Anthropology

LLC FacultyDr. Jennifer Parkinson
Core Areas: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

This course examines human origins and adaptation through a focus on evolutionary mechanisms, genetics, comparative primate biology, the human fossil record, and modern human variation. This course illustrates how core biological concepts relate to our understanding of the origins of our species, as well as exposing the connections between humans and non-human primates. Throughout the course, there will be an emphasis on the ways in which scientists learn about human evolution and the significance of human evolution for understanding humans today. As a lab course, students will conduct hands-on genetics exercises, work with fossil casts and skeletal material, and observe the behavior of living primates at the San Diego Zoo.

Corequisites: ANTH 101L


BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Marjorie Patrick
Core Areas: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment. Lecture topics will include cellular respiration and photosynthesis, organismal physiology and locomotion, and ecological interactions. Concurrent registration in BIOL 240L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.


CHNG 101: Introduction to Changemaking

LLC Faculty: Dr. Julia Cantzler
Core AreasDomestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course introduces students to ways in which individuals all over the world address social and environmental issues and their attempts to create solutions that are “more sustainable and just” than what existed. Students will gain knowledge of social innovations led by a variety of changemakers, who have sought to catalyze positive social transformations in different spheres of action across the world. The focus lies on individuals and groups with innovative endeavors and on the process for the implementation of their vision. It explores the passion, courage, empathy, and flexibility of changemakers. Questions addressed are: What motivates changemakers to pursue their visions, sometimes with relentless energy and refusing to take no for an answer? How do they navigate the process of social innovation in their own culture and in other cultures? Who do they involve in the process of achieving transformative and systematic social change? What is their personal journey?


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics (2 Sections)

LLC Faculty: Dr. Steven Sumner
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

How does technology and international trade contribute to the wage gap between skilled and unskilled workers? How does rent control and minimum wage impact society? This course is an introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, an introduction to market structure, market equilibrium, market failures, the workings of input markets, international trade and the role of the government in the economy.


EOSC 105: Natural Disasters with Lab

LLC FacultyDr. Suzanne Walther
Core AreaScientific and Technological Inquiry; Quantitative Reasoning Competency | 4 unit class

This course gives students an introduction to the earth and the dynamic natural processes that impact humanity. This course emphasizes the fundamental scientific principles and processes related to natural disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, severe weather, hurricanes, and climate change. Historic catastrophes are used to illustrate how humans can better prepare and plan for disasters, including policy-making, thereby minimizing and mitigating their impacts.

Lab section taught by Elizabeth Baker-Traloar, MS.


EOSC 110: Intro to Geosciences

LLC Faculty: Dr. Beth O'Shea

Core Areas: Scientific and Technological Inquiry; Quantitative Reasoning Competency | 4 unit class w/ lab

Have you ever looked down on the landscape from the window of a plane, or driven through a spectacular National Park and wondered, how did that form? Why does it look like that? In this course we will examine Earth's coolest features: volcanoes, unusual rock weathering, massive landslides, billion year old fossils; and the processes that contribute to their formation. To do this you will learn about plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, the geologic timescale, rivers, deserts, earthquakes, groundwater, climate, extinction events and more! This course is a 4-unit lab course satisfying the Quantitative Reasoning plus Scientific and Technological Inquiry area of the core curriculum.

Lab section taught by Elizabeth Baker-Traloar, MS.


ETHN 100: Introduction to Ethnic Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. May Fu
Core AreaSocial and Behavioral Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Ethnic Studies. Using a comparative and historical perspective, students will examine the structural, social, political, economic, and cultural issues shaping the lives and life opportunities of diverse groups within the United States. Emphasis will be placed on African-American, Asian American, Pacific Islander, Chicanxs/Latinx, and American Indian communities, but other groups are also discussed.


FYW 150: Writing as a Form of Advocacy

LLC Faculty: Vivienne MacAdam, MA
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units 

This course explores the ways in which writing is effective in advocating issues of social justice.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jason Crum
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units 

This course is an introduction to and practice in college composition and writing across multiple disciplines. We will engage with our theme to assess the many voices, traditions, and debates around such concepts as social justice and race, ethnicity, gender, & sexuality in the contemporary United States. Having first looked at how past generations and movements have defined these concepts, we will interrogate how and why these previous ideas influence us today. Our texts will be varied and wide-ranging and will include novels, poetry, graphic arts & comics, as well as scientific, socio-historical, & popular culture sources.


HIST 110/ LATS 294: Modern Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Kenneth Serbin
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry | 3 units

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the independence wars of the early nineteenth century to the present. It focuses in particular on the themes of the region's colonial legacy, social life, politics, modernization and urbanization, revolution, the quest for democracy and development, and contemporary problems.


LANG 142: Social Justice Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alejandro Meter
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Global Diversity Level 1 | 3 units 

In this course we will study the Latin American condition from a social justice perspective through literary and filmis representations of injustice centered around topics like migration and exile, gender and sexuality, indigenous and afro-Latin American narratives, the Latino/a.


POLS 150: Comparative Politics in a World of Urgent Challenges

LLC Faculty: Dr. Andy Tirrell

Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units 

This course will introduce students to comparative politics, with a special emphasis on the urgent challenges facing the world today. Through a comparative study of the domestic politics of other countries, students will consider how different societies are responding to crises such as climate change and other environmental problems, human rights abuses, economic inequality, changes in population dynamics and migration, and consumerism. Additionally, this course will offer a fundamental overview of the major issues in comparative politics, such as state formation, political regimes, political culture, civil society, political economy, governing institutions, electoral institutions, and other forms of political representation and participation.


POLS 170: Intro to International Relations

LLC Faculty: Dr. Emily Edmonds-Poli
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course examines major theoretical approaches in the discipline of international relations. Students are introduced to the study of the causes of war and the conditions of peace, international law and organizations, international political economy, great power politics, and foreign-policy decision making. The course also explores issues such as global poverty, economic development, human rights, and the environment as they affect international politics.


THRS 203: Great Moments in World Religion

LLC FacultyDr. Evelyn Kirkley
Core Areas: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

Have you ever wanted to go back in time to see what really happened at an historical event, or to change it so the future would be different? If so, this course is for you! We will recreate “great moments” in Catholic Christian and Chinese Confucian religious history with large-scale role-playing games. You will play characters with distinct beliefs, personalities, and goals. Through teamwork, negotiation, writing, and speaking, we will make history and learn why people believe and practice religion as they do. 

For a complete list of Spring 2021 Advocate LLC courses, their core attributes, and class dates & time, please use this linked document.

ANTH 101: Introduction to Biological Anthropology

LLC FacultyDr. Jennifer Parkinson
Core Areas: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

This course examines human origins and adaptation through a focus on evolutionary mechanisms, genetics, comparative primate biology, the human fossil record, and modern human variation. This course illustrates how core biological concepts relate to our understanding of the origins of our species, as well as exposing the connections between humans and non-human primates. Throughout the course, there will be an emphasis on the ways in which scientists learn about human evolution and the significance of human evolution for understanding humans today. As a lab course, students will conduct hands-on genetics exercises, work with fossil casts and skeletal material, and observe the behavior of living primates at the San Diego Zoo.

Corequisites: ANTH 101L


CHNG 101: Introduction to Changemaking

LLC Faculty: Dr. Julia Cantzler
Core AreasDomestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course introduces students to ways in which individuals all over the world address social and environmental issues and their attempts to create solutions that are “more sustainable and just” than what existed. Students will gain knowledge of social innovations led by a variety of changemakers, who have sought to catalyze positive social transformations in different spheres of action across the world. The focus lies on individuals and groups with innovative endeavors and on the process for the implementation of their vision. It explores the passion, courage, empathy, and flexibility of changemakers. Questions addressed are: What motivates changemakers to pursue their visions, sometimes with relentless energy and refusing to take no for an answer? How do they navigate the process of social innovation in their own culture and in other cultures? Who do they involve in the process of achieving transformative and systematic social change? What is their personal journey?


EOSC 110: Intro to Geosciences

LLC Faculty: Dr. Beth O'Shea

Core Areas: Scientific and Technological Inquiry; Quantitative Reasoning Competency | 4 unit class w/ lab

Have you ever looked down on the landscape from the window of a plane, or driven through a spectacular National Park and wondered, how did that form? Why does it look like that? In this course we will examine Earth's coolest features: volcanoes, unusual rock weathering, massive landslides, billion year old fossils; and the processes that contribute to their formation. To do this you will learn about plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, the geologic timescale, rivers, deserts, earthquakes, groundwater, climate, extinction events and more! This course is a 4-unit lab course satisfying the Quantitative Reasoning plus Scientific and Technological Inquiry area of the core curriculum.

Lab section taught by Elizabeth Baker-Traloar, MS.


FYW 150: Writing as a Form of Advocacy

LLC Faculty: Vivienne MacAdam, MA
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course explores the ways in which writing is effective in advocating issues of social justice.


HIST 110/ LATS 294: Modern Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Kenneth Serbin
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry | 3 units 

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the independence wars of the early nineteenth century to the present. It focuses in particular on the themes of the region's colonial legacy, social life, politics, modernization and urbanization, revolution, the quest for democracy and development, and contemporary problems.


LANG 142: Social Justice Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alejandro Meter
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Global Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

In this course we will study the Latin American condition from a social justice perspective through literary and filmis representations of injustice centered around topics like migration and exile, gender and sexuality, indigenous and afro-Latin American narratives, the Latino/a.


POLS 150: Comparative Politics in a World of Urgent Challenges

LLC Faculty: Dr. Andy Tirrell

Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course will introduce students to comparative politics, with a special emphasis on the urgent challenges facing the world today. Through a comparative study of the domestic politics of other countries, students will consider how different societies are responding to crises such as climate change and other environmental problems, human rights abuses, economic inequality, changes in population dynamics and migration, and consumerism. Additionally, this course will offer a fundamental overview of the major issues in comparative politics, such as state formation, political regimes, political culture, civil society, political economy, governing institutions, electoral institutions, and other forms of political representation and participation.


THRS 203: World Religions and Environmental Concern

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lance Nelson
Core Areas: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course will explore the major religious traditions of the world with a particular emphasis on their understandings of environmental ethics. We will engage mythic, ritual, scriptural, and theological aspects of each tradition, examining questions such as the role and responsibility of human beings in relation to other aspects of nature. We will ask the question: Is religion part of the problem, part of the solution, or both?