End Food Waste Alliance

The End Food Waste Alliance (EFWA) at USD is a collaborative enterprise of students, staff/administrators, and faculty determined to lead the university in eliminating food waste in support of the university’s strategic goals.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, food waste "refers to the discarding or alternative (non-food) use of food that is safe and nutritious for human consumption".  Read more about food loss and food waste on their website.

The mission of the End Food Waste Alliance is to engage in collaborative efforts, cross-school conversations, and consciousness raising to adopt, develop, and implement methods and strategies to end food waste at USD.

About one-third of food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted, amounting to ~1.3 billion tonnes per year.

Photo of cucumbers, illustrating wasted food levels.
Begin quote Throwing away food is like stealing from the tables of the poor and the hungry. – Pope Francis

EPA Food Recovery Hierarchy

From top to bottom the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Food Recovery Hierarchy depicts the most favored methods for preventing and diverting wasted food, in correlation with environmental, social, and economical benefits. Learn more about each of the tiers of the hierarchy on the EPA's Sustainable Management of Food web page.
hands holding a bunch of grapes
Citrus
strawberries

Food lost and wasted amounts to roughly $680 billion in industrialized countries and $310 billion in developing countries.

Get Involved:

  • Join and/or contact the Alliance by completing this form.
    • All USD students (undergraduate and graduate), staff/administrators, and faculty are welcome to join.
    • Meetings are typically held from 11:00 a.m. to noon on the last Friday of each month in Mother Rosalie Hill Hall, Room 137.
  • Sign this letter to President Harris to demonstrate your concern and support for ending food waste at USD.
EFWA Demographics- 9% Faculty, 41% Staff , 9% Grads, 41% Undergrads