Courses Linked to the Advocate LLC

2019-2020

Please note: each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details).

BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Marjorie Patrick
Core Areas: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment. The laboratory will include inquiry into the mechanisms of physiology, including testing novel hypotheses concerning bioenergetics. Concurrent registration in 240 is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit. 


CHNG 101: Introduction to Changemaking

LLC Faculty: Dr. Julia Cantzler
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Sociology is the scientific study of human action and interaction. The purpose of this course is to train students to use sociological perspectives in their everyday lives. These perspectives will be applied to a wide variety of specific topics studied by sociologists, including family, education, popular culture and the media, as well as the dynamics of social inequality based on race, class, gender, sexual orientation and religious identity, among other things. Particular attention is paid to issues of power, inequality, social change, and social justice.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Steven Sumner
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

How does technology and international trade contribute to the wage gap between skilled and unskilled workers? How does rent control and minimum wage impact society? This course is an introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, an introduction to market structure, market equilibrium, market failures, the workings of input markets, international trade and the role of the government in the economy.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Leonard Perry
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Are you interested in being a changemaking engineer? Do you enjoy solving challenging, open-ended problems? If so, come join us and explore the field of engineering! In this class you will be introduced to the skills engineers need to succeed in today's world. You will learn how to use modern engineering tools including computer-aided design, rapid prototyping, and electrical devices through hands-on projects culminating in the design of a small robotic vehicle. This course is intended for majors in engineering, or those exploring careers in engineering but no prior experience with engineering is assumed.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


EOSC 105: Natural Disasters

LLC Faculty: Dr. Zhi-Yong Yin
Core Areas: Scientific and Technological Inquiry; Quantitative Reasoning Competency | 3 unit class w/ lab

This course will give students an introduction to the earth and the dynamic natural processes that impact humanity and life in general. Man and nature are becoming increasingly intertwined as the human race continues to proliferate. This course will emphasize the fundamental scientific principles and processes related to natural disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, severe weather, hurricanes, meteorite impacts, and climate change. Historic catastrophes will be emphasized, but current events are also discussed, especially for those that revealed social justice issues. This course includes a weekly lab, in which students will learn to identify rocks and minerals, employ map skills to study faults, coastal erosion, landslides, flooding, and other natural hazards, and interpret meteorological and climate data. Natural hazards in San Diego will be examined through local field trips. This course has a mandatory weekend field trip.


ETHN 100: Introduction to Ethnic Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. May Fu
Core Area: Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Ethnic Studies. Using a comparative and historical perspective, students will examine the structural, social, political, economic, and cultural issues shaping the lives and life opportunities of diverse groups within the United States. Emphasis will be placed on African-American, Asian American, Pacific Islander, Chicanxs/Latinx, and American Indian communities, but other groups are also discussed.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Vivienne MacAdam, M.A.
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course explores the concept of social justice both from a global and local perspective. Some questions are: how has social justice been defined in various contexts, including those involving race, ethnicity, gender and class, and how have these concepts changed over time? We will explore these issues by considering their examination in various contexts and multiple genres and discourses. These will include writings in fiction, journalism, scholarly articles, the media and historical writings. Since this is first year writing, all the work produced will be workshopped and peer reviewed in several drafts.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jason Crum
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course is an introduction to and practice in college composition and writing across fields. We will engage with our theme of Cultivate to assess the many voices, traditions, and debates around such concepts as eco-criticism, the environment, and sustainability. We will work closely with USD’s Sustainability Office to write and engage with these issues outside of class. We will come to see these Cultivate and sustainability debates as ongoing. Having first looked at how past generations and movements have defined these concepts, we will interrogate how and why those previous ideas influence us today. Our texts will be varied and wide-ranging and will include novels, poetry, graphic arts & comics, as well as scientific, socio-historical, & popular culture sources.


HIST 110: Modern Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Kenneth Serbin
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry; Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the independence wars of the early nineteenth century to the present. It focuses in particular on the themes of the region's colonial legacy, social life, politics, modernization and urbanization, revolution, the quest for democracy and development, and contemporary problems.


LANG 142: Social Justice Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alejandro Meter
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity | 3 units

The region known today as "Latin America" is the product of a long and complex process of conquest and colonization. Since colonial times, Latin American and Caribbean cultures have developed against a background of cultural oppression, racial conflict, political domination, colonial exploitation, and gender inequality. Out of this tension and conflict, however, emerged an extraordinary variety and wealth of literary and artistic creations. In this course we will study the Latin American condition from a social justice perspective through literary and filmic representations of injustice centered around topics like migration and exile, gender and sexuality, indigenous and afro-Latin American narratives, and the politics of memory.


POLS 170: Intro to International Relations

LLC Faculty: Dr. Emily Edmonds-Poli
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course examines major theoretical approaches in the discipline of international relations. Students are introduced to the study of the causes of war and the conditions of peace, international law and organizations, international political economy, great power politics, and development, human rights, and the environment as they affect international politics.


THRS 121: Chicanx Religious Identities

LLC Faculty: Dr. Peter Mena
Core Areas: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

An historical and contextual investigation of Chicanx identities in relation to religious and spiritual traditions, with special attention to Catholic Christianity. Students will engage in community based learning and reflect critically on constructions of power, privilege, and oppression.


THRS 203: World Religions and Environmental Concern

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lance Nelson
Core Areas: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course will explore the major religious traditions of the world with a particular emphasis on their understandings of environmental ethics. We will engage mythic, ritual, scriptural, and theological aspects of each tradition, examining questions such as the role and responsibility of human beings in relation to other aspects of nature. We will ask the question: Is religion part of the problem, part of the solution, or both?

 

CHNG 101: Introduction to Changemaking

LLC Faculty: Dr. Julia Cantzler
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Sociology is the scientific study of human action and interaction. The purpose of this course is to train students to use sociological perspectives in their everyday lives. These perspectives will be applied to a wide variety of specific topics studied by sociologists, including family, education, popular culture and the media, as well as the dynamics of social inequality based on race, class, gender, sexual orientation and religious identity, among other things. Particular attention is paid to issues of power, inequality, social change, and social justice.


EOSC 105: Natural Disasters Lab

LLC Faculty: Dr. LeeAnna Chapman
Core Areas: Scientific and Technological Inquiry; Quantitative Reasoning Competency | 3 unit class w/ lab

This course will give students an introduction to the earth and the dynamic natural processes that impact humanity and life in general. Man and nature are becoming increasingly intertwined as the human race continues to proliferate. This course will emphasize the fundamental scientific principles and processes related to natural disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, severe weather, hurricanes, meteorite impacts, and climate change. Historic catastrophes will be emphasized, but current events are also discussed, especially for those that revealed social justice issues. This course includes a weekly lab, in which students will learn to identify rocks and minerals, employ map skills to study faults, coastal erosion, landslides, flooding, and other natural hazards, and interpret meteorological and climate data. Natural hazards in San Diego will be examined through local field trips. This course has a mandatory weekend field trip.


ETHN 100: Introduction to Ethnic Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. May Fu
Core Area: Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Ethnic Studies. Using a comparative and historical perspective, students will examine the structural, social, political, economic, and cultural issues shaping the lives and life opportunities of diverse groups within the United States. Emphasis will be placed on African-American, Asian American, Pacific Islander, Chicanxs/Latinx, and American Indian communities, but other groups are also discussed.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Vivienne MacAdam, M.A.
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course explores the concept of social justice both from a global and local perspective. Some questions are: how has social justice been defined in various contexts, including those involving race, ethnicity, gender and class, and how have these concepts changed over time? We will explore these issues by considering their examination in various contexts and multiple genres and discourses. These will include writings in fiction, journalism, scholarly articles, the media and historical writings. Since this is first year writing, all the work produced will be workshopped and peer reviewed in several drafts.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jason Crum
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course is an introduction to and practice in college composition and writing across fields. We will engage with our theme of Cultivate to assess the many voices, traditions, and debates around such concepts as eco-criticism, the environment, and sustainability. We will work closely with USD’s Sustainability Office to write and engage with these issues outside of class. We will come to see these Cultivate and sustainability debates as ongoing. Having first looked at how past generations and movements have defined these concepts, we will interrogate how and why those previous ideas influence us today. Our texts will be varied and wide-ranging and will include novels, poetry, graphic arts & comics, as well as scientific, socio-historical, & popular culture sources.


HIST 110: Modern Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Kenneth Serbin
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry; Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the independence wars of the early nineteenth century to the present. It focuses in particular on the themes of the region's colonial legacy, social life, politics, modernization and urbanization, revolution, the quest for democracy and development, and contemporary problems.


LANG 142: Social Justice Latin America

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alejandro Meter
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity | 3 units

The region known today as "Latin America" is the product of a long and complex process of conquest and colonization. Since colonial times, Latin American and Caribbean cultures have developed against a background of cultural oppression, racial conflict, political domination, colonial exploitation, and gender inequality. Out of this tension and conflict, however, emerged an extraordinary variety and wealth of literary and artistic creations. In this course we will study the Latin American condition from a social justice perspective through literary and filmic representations of injustice centered around topics like migration and exile, gender and sexuality, indigenous and afro-Latin American narratives, and the politics of memory.


THRS 121: Chicanx Religious Identities

LLC Faculty: Dr. Peter Mena
Core Areas: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

An historical and contextual investigation of Chicanx identities in relation to religious and spiritual traditions, with special attention to Catholic Christianity. Students will engage in community based learning and reflect critically on constructions of power, privilege, and oppression.


THRS 203: World Religions and Environmental Concern

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lance Nelson
Core Areas: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course will explore the major religious traditions of the world with a particular emphasis on their understandings of environmental ethics. We will engage mythic, ritual, scriptural, and theological aspects of each tradition, examining questions such as the role and responsibility of human beings in relation to other aspects of nature. We will ask the question: Is religion part of the problem, part of the solution, or both?