Bookmark and Share

The Natural World LLC

Preceptorials Linked to the Natural World LLC 2013-2014

Archaeology: How the Unwritten Past Informs the Present (Anth 103) Introduction to Microbiology for Non-Majors
(Biol 104)
Introduction to Evolution, Genetics, and Ecology (Biol 190) Introduction to Engineering (Engr 101)
Life in the Ocean (Envi 121) Changes in Modern European History (Hist 140)
Cryptography: The Mathematics of Making and Breaking Codes (Math 112) Introductory Psychology (Psyc 101)

ANTH 103: Archaeology: How the Unwritten Past Informs the Present

Preceptor: Dr. Alana cordy-collins
Credit: social science Core / 3 UNITS

Written history covers only a small percentage of the time and events of our human past.  Archaeology allows us to look deeper and more broadly.  The goal of archaeological practice and study is to discern patterns of prehistoric human behavior, patterns that allow us to see the people of times past through their failures and accomplishments.  Ancient people have played many of our current concerns out repeatedly:  war, environmental degradation, and social inequality, to name a few.  But there have also been stunning innovations, comparable to those we applaud today:  monumental architectural constructions without the benefit of modern heavy machinery, chemical electroplating of gold in the absence of electrical current, astronomical observations made by people lacking even basic instrumentation.  Archaeologically-revealed human beings are our direct ancestors, and they have a great deal to tell us if we teach ourselves to learn.

BIOL 104: Introductory Microbiology for Non-Majors

Preceptor: Dr. Neena Din
Credit: Life Science Core / 3 units

In this course we will discuss topics ranging from the discovery of microbes, their structure, growth and diversity, as well as the roles they play in the environment, the diseases they cause and their control. We will also discuss applications of microbiology through topics that appear in the news, such as health related effects of hurricanes and biological weapons, as well as how microorganisms can be used to help solve some of the environmental issues that humans face today.

BIOL 190: Introduction to Evolution

Preceptor: Dr. terry bird
Credit: Life Science Core / 3 UNITS

This one semester foundation course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance, evolution, and ecology. Three hours of lecture weekly. No prerequisite.

ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

Preceptor: Dr. Thomas schubert
Credit: elective credit / 3 units

Introduction to the field of engineering.  Exploration of problem solving in lecture and laboratory projects in different engineering disciplines.  Introduction to engineering software tools.  Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering.  Four hours lecture-recitation-laboratory weekly.  Concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 115 or 150 required.

ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

Preceptor: Dr. Rick Olson
Credit: elective credit / 3 units

Introduction to the field of engineering.  Exploration of problem solving in lecture and laboratory projects in different engineering disciplines.  Introduction to engineering software tools.  Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering.  Four hours lecture-recitation-laboratory weekly.  Concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 115 or 150 required.

ENVI 121: Life in the Ocean

Preceptor: Dr. nathalie reyns
Credit: life science Core / 4 units

An introduction to the organisms in the ocean, including their phylogenetic and ecological interrelationships.  Biological principles and processes that are basic to all forms of life in the ocean will be stressed.  This course will satisfy the core curriculum requirement for a life science and for a laboratory course.  Three hours of lecture and one laboratory per week.

HIST 140: Change in Modern European History

Preceptor: Dr. Clara Oberle
Credit: humanities core / 3 unites

This class investigates changes in Modern European History (1780-present) through the lense of community and social justice.  From the French Revolution to immigration and education debates in contemporary Europe, we examine changes in how “community” and “social justice” have been conceived and experienced.  Who was excluded, who included?  Under which conditions have concepts of community and social justice changed over time?  What role do technological inventions, scientific discoveries, the circulation of new ideas, but also economic and built structures, institutions, demographic factors and the actions of individuals play in generating or hindering change?  Likewise, we will turn to the debates about change itself.  When is change welcomed?  How have fears of change or hopes for change and progress been used to advance different causes?  The sources we will study in this course include a wide range of materials from the Enlightenment and French Revolution era; the Industrial Revolution; the emergence of nationalism; European Imperialism; National Socialism and Soviet Communism; the two World Wars and subsequent reconstruction and reconciliation efforts; histories of communities and everyday life; and two centuries of European immigration and integration debates.

MATH 112: Cryptography: The Mathematics of Making and Breaking Codes

Preceptor: Dr. cameron parker
Credit: Math Core / 3 UNITS

Throughout history, people have tried to keep their communications unintelligible to unwanted eyes, from war communications in Roman times to ciphers used every day with the exchange of online banking information.  This course will study how codes have been made and how they have been broken.  In the process basic concepts in many disparate areas of mathematics including number theory, statistics, probability, and information theory will be investigated.  The course will also look at ethical issues relating to an individual’s right to communicate secretly versus the government’s duty to keep its citizens safe.  A multidisciplinary approach will be used and the topics of military history, the theory and history of computing, and ethical practices will be incorporated within this mathematics course that satisfies the mathematics core requirement.

PSYC 101: Introductory Psychology

Preceptor: Dr. Jennifer Zwolinski
Credit: social science core / 3 units

This course provides an introduction to the field of psychology and includes the following topics:  history of psychology, psychology as a science, biopsychology, development, learning, cognition, motivation, emotion, personality, social psychology, psychological disorders, and therapy.