Yes

This woman fundamentally changed climate science — and you’ve probably never heard of her

This woman fundamentally changed climate science — and you’ve probably never heard of her

Eunice Foote is finally honored for her contributions 162 years later. It was “blind luck” said Ray Sorenson, a retired petroleum geologist, regarding how he first came across Eunice Foote’s name. Sorenson, whose basement in Oklahoma is full of more than 300 pre-Civil War era technical books, discovered Foote’s name sometime in 2010. As he quickly realized, Foote was the first scientist to make the connection between carbon dioxide and climate change. She discovered CO2’s warming properties in 1856, more than 160 years ago and three years before John Tyndall, a British scientist who has widely been credited with first establishing the connection between increased global temperatures and carbon dioxide.

To read more about the research behind this claim, visit: Eunice Foote's Pioneering Research On CO2 And Climate Warming

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