Conference Program

Tackling stigma, mobilizing hope - featuring a city skyline, shaped like happy umbrella.

 

Schedule at a Glance

Thursday, June 11, 2020 

 

7:00

8:30

10:30

11:00

12:30

1:00

2:00

3:30

4:00

5:30

Registration

Invited Plenary Speakers:
Institutional partners

Break

Parallel Sessions

Poster Session

Lunch

Parallel

Sessions

Break

Invited Plenary Speaker

Opening Ceremony & Welcome Cocktail

Friday, June 12, 2020

 

07:00

08:30

10:30

11:00

12:30

13:00

14:00

15:30

16:00

17:30

Registration

Invited Plenary Speakers

Break

Parallel Sessions

Poster Session

Lunch

Parallel Sessions

Break

Invited Plenary Speaker

Free evening to explore San Diego

Saturday, June 13, 2020

 

7:00

8:30

10:30

11:00

12:30

1:00

2:00

3:30

4:00

 

Registration

Invited Plenary Speaker 

Break

Parallel 
Sessions

Invited Plenary Speaker

 

 

Announcement of 2020 Mental Health Champions awards

Lunch

Parallel Sessions

Break

Closing Ceremony

 

 

Keynote Speakers

 Patel

Vikram Patel, MBBS, PhD is The Pershing Square Professor of Global Health and Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow at the Harvard Medical School. He co-leads the Global Mental Health@Harvard initiative. His work has focused on the burden of mental disorders, their association with social disadvantage, and the use of community resources for their prevention and treatment. He holds Honorary Professorships at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, the Public Health Foundation of India, and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (where he co-founded the Centre for Global Mental Health and the Mental Health Innovations Network). He is a co-founder of Sangath, an Indian NGO which won the MacArthur Foundation’s International Prize for Creative and Effective Institutions in 2008 and the WHO Public Health Champion of India award in 2016. He is a co-founder of the Movement for Global Mental Health. He is a Fellow of the UK's Academy of Medical Sciences and has served on several WHO expert and Government of India committees, including the Committee which drafted India’s first National Mental Health Policy and the WHO High Level Independent Commission for Non-Communicable Diseases and Mental Health. He has been awarded the Chalmers Medal (Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, UK), the Sarnat International Prize (US National Academy of Medicine), an Honorary Doctorate from Georgetown University, the Pardes Humanitarian Prize (the Brain & Behaviour Research Foundation), an Honorary OBE from the UK Government and the John Dirk Canada Gairdner Award in Global Health in 2019. He was listed in TIME Magazine’s 100 most influential persons of the year in 2015.

Keynote: From Science to Action: Transforming Mental Health Globally

Mental health problems affect us all.  The massive unmet need for care, the rising incidence of mental health problems in young people, the abuses of fundamental rights of people with mental health problems, and the very low investment in mental health care nationally and through development assistance, are unacceptable. Quite simply, mental health is the orphan child of the health care system and all countries are developing when it comes to mental health. No country will achieve the aspirations of Universal Health Coverage without addressing mental health, for health care cannot be universal without mental health.  Even as there is growing global and national political will to invest in mental health, several structural barriers impede the likely impact of this historic opportunity to transform mental health globally. The GlobalMentalHealth@Harvard Initiative will seed, scale, and sustain work-streams that seek to address five such fundamental barriers:  the limited leadership capacity; the lack of a workforce equipped with skills to deliver psychosocial interventions; the lack of accountability and metrics to evaluate the impact of mental health care systems; the rising burden of mental health problems in young people; and the limited agency and voice of persons with mental health problems. This lecture will provide an overview of the landscape of how action on these five structural barriers will catalyze the realization of the aspirations of mental health for all.

 Griffith

James Griffith, MD is the Leon M. Yochelson Professor and Chair in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.  As a psychiatric educator, Dr. Griffith developed a psychiatry residency program at George Washington University that has been distinguished for its curriculum in cultural psychiatry, global mental health, psychosocial care for medically-ill patients, and building resilience to adversity.  In his clinical research, Dr. Griffith has published extensively on family-centered treatment of psychosomatic disorders and chronic medical illnesses, including a book, The Body Speaks: Therapeutic Dialogues for Mind-Body Problems.  His most recent book, Religion that Heals, Religion that Harms, addressed destructive uses of religion and ideology in clinical settings and received the Creative Scholarship Award from the Society for the Study of Psychiatry and Culture.  Dr. Griffith provides psychiatric care for immigrants, refugees, and survivors of political torture at Northern Virginia Family Services in Falls Church, VA.  He has received the Human Rights Community Award from the United Nations Association of the National Capital Area and the Margaret B. and Cyril A. Schulman Distinguished Service Award from the George Washington University Medical Center, both for the training of mental health professionals and development of mental health services for survivors of political torture in the Washington metropolitan area. As an educator, he has received the Distinguished Teacher Award from the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.  He was selected by the Washington Psychiatric Society as its 2003 Psychiatrist of the Year and for its 2014 Distinguished Service Award.  He was the 2017 recipient of the Oskar Pfister Award from the American Psychiatric Association for his contributions to the field of religion and psychiatry.  He has been selected by Washingtonian Magazine as a 2019 “Top Doctor in Washington.”

Keynote: Hope Modules: An Antidote for Powerlessness of Social Exclusion

The powerlessness of social exclusion activates a stigmatized person’s behavioral inhibition system (BIS).  The BIS has been likened to an alarm system that, once activated by threats or potential punishments, triggers heightened vigilance for threats, avoidance, suppression of action, and despair.  This BIS activation further impairs effective performance of goal-seeking, problem-solving, and relational strategies, amplifying the stigmatized person’s low-power position.  Hope modules are resilience-building psychotherapeutic interventions that strengthen morale by mobilizing a person’s strengths for sustaining hope.  Hope modules regard hope as a practice, rather than an emotional response to life circumstances, i.e. “something you do” rather than “something you feel.”  Assessment is conducted by observing a stigmatized person’s coping responses to extreme stress, which helps identify signature strengths for sustaining hope as a practice.  A hope module packages skill sets for assessment, formulation, and intervention around a single evidence-informed hope practice that can be sustained despite the low-power position of social exclusion.  Hope modules can be tailored to the specific predicaments with which a stigmatized person is struggling.  They can be integrated into primary care, case management, or other humanitarian encounters in settings that do not permit formal psychotherapy. Hope modules can help a stigmatized person to stay in a posture of assertive coping and behavioral activation, rather than behavioral inhibition. 

 Kohrt

Brandon Kohrt, MD, PhD is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. As an internationally recognized global mental health expert, he works with populations affected by war-related trauma, torture, environmental disasters, and chronic stressor of poverty, discrimination, and lack of access to healthcare. Dr. Kohrt has worked in Nepal since 1996 and has been advisor to Transcultural Psychosocial Organization (TPO) Nepal since 2006. He has collaborated with The Carter Center Mental Health Program in Liberia since 2010. He has investigated the mental health consequences of and designed interventions for child soldiers and earthquake survivors in Nepal. He collaborated on development of a Nepali school-based youth suicide prevention program. In Liberia, he designed programs to reduce stigma among youth and adults impacted by mental illness, political violence, and the Ebola virus outbreak, and co-designed a Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) program for police officers. He has collaborated on interventions for children with Nodding Syndrome in Uganda and children affected by HIV and political violence in Nigeria. In addition, he has worked in Uganda, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Mongolia, Haiti and India. Dr. Kohrt has published over 100 peer reviewed articles and book chapters. He co-edited the book Global Mental Health: Anthropological Perspectives, which was honored with the creative scholarship award of the Society for the Study of Psychiatry and Culture. He has received research funding from NIMH, Grand Challenges Canada, UNICEF, the Fulbright Program, HopeLab, and the Jacobs Foundation. His clinical work addresses cross-cultural psychiatry specializing in refugees and immigrant populations. He founded the Atlanta Asylum Network for Torture Survivors and consults on suicide prevention programs for Bhutanese Nepali refugees. Dr. Kohrt has developed a global mental health training program in Nepal for students in medicine, public health, and anthropology. 

 Gurung

Dristy Gurung, MS has been working in the field of mental health and research since 2009. She started her career as research assistant and translator and currently holds the position of project/research coordinator at TPO Nepal. She is also a member of TPO management team representing the research department. As part of her position, she takes lead on designing, implementing, monitoring, analyzing, and disseminating research projects. She is also involved in ensuring the ethical and quality aspects of research conducted by TPO Nepal and is involved in supporting the capacity building of in-house research staffs. She previously coordinated a consortium-based project called Emerald in Nepal and is currently involved in numerous research projects in TPO.

Keynote: TBA

 Falicov

Celia Falicov, PhD is an internationally known family therapy author, teacher and clinician. A licensed clinical psychologist and family therapist, she is Clinical Professor in the Department of Family and Public Health and directs prevention and mental health services for Latino immigrant clients at the Medical Student Run Free Clinic of the University of California, San Diego. She is a Past President of the American Family Therapy Academy. Dr. Falicov pioneered writings on family transitions, migration and cultural perspectives in psychotherapy practice and training, and has received many professional awards for this work. Her recent books include the widely praised Latino Families in Therapy (2014, 2nd edition) and the co-authored 2014 APA book Multiculturalism and Diversity in Clinical Supervision: A Competency Based Approach.  Her recent articles and presentations focus on separations and reunifications in immigrant families, emotional transnationalism in immigrant offspring, Latino masculinities, and also intercultural couples.    

Keynote: Honoring Immigrant Clients’ Voices and Counteracting Stigma

Perhaps more than ever, the process of migration and its traumatic sequelae have become key determinants of mental health stress and disparities of care. This presentation describes mental health community-oriented and strength-based collaborative practices that have been implemented for the past decade in a health clinic serving an under resourced and uninsured vulnerable Latino immigrant clientele. The practitioners range from medical students to experienced volunteer professionals and paraprofessionals. We describe and illustrate a variety of individual and group supportive and empowering approaches that help reduce stigma, ameliorate fear of discrimination and reinvigorate hope while encouraging self-care and mental health involvement. Case material demonstrates the need for flexibility of practice model, family involvement, cultural humility and cross-professional communication.