Women’s Venture Summit Helps Female Founders Get to Even

Thursday, October 10, 2019TOPICS: Conferences and WorkshopsGuest SpeakersInnovation and Entrepreneurship

More than 200 attendees gathered at USD for the Sixth Annual Women's Venture SummitJasmine Crowe, founder of Goodr, speaks at the sixth annual Women's Venture Summit at the University of San Diego
begin quoteWe want to see just as many women and minority founders starting companies and getting venture capital funding as men.

On Saturday, Sept. 14, more than 200 attendees gathered at the University of San Diego for the sixth annual Women’s Venture Summit, a conference focused on getting female-led startups funded. Throughout the day, attendees participated in “entrepreneur” and “investor” tracks with one key message in mind: get to even.

In 2018, women-led companies secured just over two percent of venture capital funding. The summit’s organizers are on a mission to even the playing field.

“Women’s Venture Summit was created to help women-led companies make money and make an impact,” said Dr. Silvia Mah, founder of the event. “We want to see just as many women and minority founders starting companies and getting venture capital funding as men. That’s why we’re working to provide all people, regardless of gender, with the tools and resources to become informed investors.”

In its first five years, the summit helped women raise $4 million in seed capital. There’s no total yet for this year, though Samantha Urban, founder of San Diego-based Urban Translations, noted that she’s already gained interest from investors because of attending the 2019 summit.

“In 2016 and 2017, I landed investment deals of around $400,000 by forming and strengthening my relationships with investors during the Women’s Venture Summit,” said Urban. “This year I came back to share my success story on stage, and in doing so, attracted the attention of three more investors who are interested in helping me grow my digital menu software company.”

Women like Urban and keynote speaker Jasmine Crowe didn’t attend the summit just for camaraderie; they participated because they are serious about helping women grow impactful, revenue-generating businesses.

“Do not be afraid to invest in businesses that are solving real problems for tomorrow,” said Jasmine Crowe, founder of Goodr, a company that helps entities like the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport manage food waste while...

Contact:

Renata Ramirez
renataramirez@sandiego.edu
(619) 260-4658