Classes Linked to the Engage TLC

2020 - 2021

Each of the classes below fulfills the First Year Integration component of the Core Curriculum, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details).

 

ARCH 494: Design by Money

TLC Faculty: Dr. Shannon Starkey
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

A focused investigation of select issues in architecture, architectural design or urbanism.


ARTH 102: Introduction to Asian Art History

TLC Faculty: Dr. Jessica Patterson
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

This course is an introduction to the way ideas and practices pertaining to art have developed in the cultural traditions of Asia. We will study the historical materials through the lens of many concepts and ideas that have become integral to art historical scholarship, including material culture theory, iconography, and visual narration.


CHNG 101: Introduction to Changemaking

TLC Faculty: Dr. Mike Williams
Core AreasDomestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course introduces students to ways in which individuals all over the world address social and environmental issues and their attempts to create solutions that are “more sustainable and just” than what existed. Students will gain knowledge of social innovations led by a variety of changemakers, who have sought to catalyze positive social transformations in different spheres of action across the world. The focus lies on individuals and groups with innovative endeavors and on the process for the implementation of their vision. It explores the passion, courage, empathy, and flexibility of changemakers. Questions addressed are: What motivates changemakers to pursue their visions, sometimes with relentless energy and refusing to take no for an answer? How do they navigate the process of social innovation in their own culture and in other cultures? Who do they involve in the process of achieving transformative and systematic social change? What is their personal journey?


COMM 265: Introduction to Research

TLC Faculty: Dr. Bradley Bond
Core Area: Quantitative Reasoning Competency | 3 units

This class is an introduction to communication research methodologies. Students are exposed to the prevailing paradigms of qualitative and quantitative research in the discipline. The interpretive, descriptive, and explanatory foundations of research methodologies will be examined. Ethical principles governing the process of research will also be explored. This course satisfies the quantitative reasoning flag for the core.


ENGL 304W: Advanced Composition

TLC Faculty: Prof. Lisa Smith
Core Area: Advanced Writing Competency | 3 units

A workshop course in the writing of expository, descriptive, and critical prose. This course is designed to fulfill the upper division written literacy requirement for non-English majors; it will fulfill an upper division elective for English majors. 


ENGL 358: Staging America

TLC Faculty: Dr. Cynthia Caywood
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course examines how the idea of America and what it means to be American has been staged in our theaters. We will read plays about both the American dream and the American nightmare and consider how community has been built and challenged. We will also study the elements of drama to understand them generically and as performances. The class will see several productions, on film and, if possible, live. Texts might include Wilson, The Piano Lesson; Kushner, Angels in America; Sondheim, Assassins; Miller, Death of a Salesman; Miranda, In the Heights; Nottage, Sweat; Valdez, Zoot Suit; Lauro, Piece of My Heart.


ENGL 358: Contemporary Ethnic Dystopias

TLC Faculty: Dr. Jason Crum
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course will examine late 20th & early 21st Century Ethnic Dystopian fiction and popular culture in the United States. Our sources for this cultural studies course will be varied and will include recent trends in literature, film, digital storytelling, graphic novels, & video games. We will trace the development of imaginings and re-imaginings of utopia, their exclusions and gaps, and seek to examine how ethnic and racial minorities in the United States have contested such ideas as utopia/dystopia, class, race, gender, & sexuality. Readings will include works such as Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, NK Jemisin’s The Fifth Season, Chang-Rae Lee’s On Such a Full Sea, Samuel Delany’s Trouble on Triton, and Omar El Akkad’s American War. We will also turn to and look analytically at the political, social, and economic climate that allows for the portrayal of ethnicity in recent pop culture titles such as Alex Rivera’s Sleep Dealer and Alfonso Cuaron’s Children of Men.


ENGL 364: Cyborg Studies

TLC Faculty: Dr. Koonyong Kim
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Global Diversity Level 2 | 3 units

Explore the brave new world of cyborgs! This course examines influential literary and filmic works featuring cyborgs. Building upon recent debates on digital technology, cyberspace, network society, utopia/dystopia, and posthumanism, we will reflect on how various cyborg stories can help us reconsider our conventional ideas of human identity, reality, love, communication, family, gender, and nation, among others

HIST 115: Fighting the Red Menace - History of the Cold War 1945-1990

TLC Faculty: Dr. Michael Gonzalez
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry | 3 units

This class will fulfill the Historical Inquiry/Critical Thinking and Information Literacy criterion for USD’s academic core. To that end, the class will examine the Cold War and its impact on American culture. We will open the class by discussing the origins of Soviet authoritarianism and then examine the differences between capitalism and communism. Next, we focus on the United States and ask how Americans prepared for the struggle against the Soviet Union. The class will then cover American foreign policy and examine how the Cold War influenced domestic issues in the United States. The class will close by discussing the nuclear arms race and show how the struggle to deploy atomic weapons changed the Soviet Union and the United States. The class will be challenging, but fun, and students will be expected to master the material.


LANG 140: Literature and Civic Engagement in the Italian Renaissance

TLC Faculty: Dr. Brittany Asaro
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

The great flourishing of arts and culture in Italy during the late Middle Ages and Renaissance, called Humanism, redefined the concept of the human being and his or her place within the context of the familial, civic, and even global community. Every affirmation of the human being's beauty, dignity, and goodness, however, also introduces infinite questions: What are the responsibilities and rights of individuals in society? What are the causes and effects of misrule? Did Humanism truly exalt all humankind? Was the Renaissance a time of improved social conditions for all Italian citizens? How do our answers to these questions reshape our perceptions of the Italian Middle Ages and Renaissance? In this course, students will examine the unique role of Humanism within the development of Western civilization, as well as challenge the very concepts of "civilization" and "progress" by considering the new literary, spiritual, and human values that emerged during the Italian Renaissance through differing lenses. This course is taught in English and all texts will be read in English translation.


MUSC 130: Music in Society

TLC Faculty: Dr. Jeff Malecki
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry; Undergraduate Research | 3 units

An introduction to musical terminology, followed by a survey of classical music from the Middle Ages to the present, focusing on the social, political, and religious function of music in its society. Reading, writing, listening, and concert visits required. This course fulfills the core curriculum requirement for Fine Arts.


PHIL 335: Death and Dying

TLC Faculty: Dr. Turner Nevitt
Core Area:  | 3 units

This course explores the metaphysical and ethical issues related to death and dying. Topics include the nature of death, the value of death, the meaning of life, the possibility of the afterlife, a survey of ethical theories, and their application to issues of war and peace, killing in self-defense, suicide and assisted suicide, the death penalty, euthanasia, and medical decisions at the end of life.


POLS 371: American Foreign Policy

TLC Faculty: Dr. Vidya Nadkarni
Core Area: Social & Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course will provide students with an in-depth look at the challenges and opportunities facing American foreign policy in the 21st century through an examination of the institutional context of foreign policy decision making, the range of policy instruments available to leaders and the major theoretical approaches in the discipline of international relations.


THRS 112: Introduction to World Religions

TLC Faculty: Rev. Lark Stephenson Diaz
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

A survey of the major religious traditions of the world, focusing on an understanding of the religious world views and practices that shape cultures across the globe. Selected readings from these traditions, which will include Christianity, the religions of India and East Asia, Judaism, Islam, and the religions of indigenous oral cultures. Students may not receive credit for taking both THRS 112 and THRS 113.


THRS 114: Good, Evil, and Original Justice

TLC Faculty: Dr. Peter Bennett
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course is an introductory survey designed to prepare students for upper division courses in Christian theology. Topics may include the scriptures, history of the Church and/or theology, the nature of theological discourse, introduction to theological terms and definitions, and examination of select topics or issues in theology. Emphasis will be placed on the constitutive dimensions and characteristics of the Roman Catholic tradition.


THRS 125: Black Religious History

TLC Faculty: Prof. Jamall Calloway
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course studies the history and development of religion and theology during and after the transatlantic slave trade. We will look at the development of Catholicism in its relation to African Traditional Religions and evaluate how they influenced and altered Black religious beliefs in the modern world.


THRS 336: The Problem of God

TLC Faculty: Fr. Mike White
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

The questions “What is God?,” “Does God exist?” and “What does it mean to believe in God?” are investigated against the background of classical theism and modern thought.

ENGL 358: Contemporary Ethnic Dystopias

TLC Faculty: Dr. Jason Crum
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course will examine late 20th & early 21st Century Ethnic Dystopian fiction and popular culture in the United States. Our sources for this cultural studies course will be varied and will include recent trends in literature, film, digital storytelling, graphic novels, & video games. We will trace the development of imaginings and re-imaginings of utopia, their exclusions and gaps, and seek to examine how ethnic and racial minorities in the United States have contested such ideas as utopia/dystopia, class, race, gender, & sexuality. Readings will include works such as Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, NK Jemisin’s The Fifth Season, Chang-Rae Lee’s On Such a Full Sea, Samuel Delany’s Trouble on Triton, and Omar El Akkad’s American War. We will also turn to and look analytically at the political, social, and economic climate that allows for the portrayal of ethnicity in recent pop culture titles such as Alex Rivera’s Sleep Dealer and Alfonso Cuaron’s Children of Men.


HIST 115: Fighting the Red Menace - History of the Cold War 1945-1990

TLC Faculty: Dr. Michael Gonzalez
Core Areas: Historical Inquiry | 3 units

This class will fulfill the Historical Inquiry/Critical Thinking and Information Literacy criterion for USD’s academic core. To that end, the class will examine the Cold War and its impact on American culture. We will open the class by discussing the origins of Soviet authoritarianism and then examine the differences between capitalism and communism. Next, we focus on the United States and ask how Americans prepared for the struggle against the Soviet Union. The class will then cover American foreign policy and examine how the Cold War influenced domestic issues in the United States. The class will close by discussing the nuclear arms race and show how the struggle to deploy atomic weapons changed the Soviet Union and the United States. The class will be challenging, but fun, and students will be expected to master the material.


LANG 140: Literature and Civic Engagement in the Italian Renaissance

TLC Faculty: Dr. Brittany Asaro
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

The great flourishing of arts and culture in Italy during the late Middle Ages and Renaissance, called Humanism, redefined the concept of the human being and his or her place within the context of the familial, civic, and even global community. Every affirmation of the human being's beauty, dignity, and goodness, however, also introduces infinite questions: What are the responsibilities and rights of individuals in society? What are the causes and effects of misrule? Did Humanism truly exalt all humankind? Was the Renaissance a time of improved social conditions for all Italian citizens? How do our answers to these questions reshape our perceptions of the Italian Middle Ages and Renaissance? In this course, students will examine the unique role of Humanism within the development of Western civilization, as well as challenge the very concepts of "civilization" and "progress" by considering the new literary, spiritual, and human values that emerged during the Italian Renaissance through differing lenses. This course is taught in English and all texts will be read in English translation.


PHIL 335: Death and Dying

TLC Faculty: Dr. Turner Nevitt
Core Area:  | 3 units

This course explores the metaphysical and ethical issues related to death and dying. Topics include the nature of death, the value of death, the meaning of life, the possibility of the afterlife, a survey of ethical theories, and their application to issues of war and peace, killing in self-defense, suicide and assisted suicide, the death penalty, euthanasia, and medical decisions at the end of life.


POLS 371: American Foreign Policy

TLC Faculty: Dr. Vidya Nadkarni
Core Area: Social & Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course will provide students with an in-depth look at the challenges and opportunities facing American foreign policy in the 21st century through an examination of the institutional context of foreign policy decision making, the range of policy instruments available to leaders and the major theoretical approaches in the discipline of international relations.


THRS 112: Introduction to World Religions

TLC Faculty: Rev. Lark Stephenson Diaz
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

A survey of the major religious traditions of the world, focusing on an understanding of the religious world views and practices that shape cultures across the globe. Selected readings from these traditions, which will include Christianity, the religions of India and East Asia, Judaism, Islam, and the religions of indigenous oral cultures. Students may not receive credit for taking both THRS 112 and THRS 113.


THRS 114: Good, Evil, and Original Justice

TLC Faculty: Dr. Peter Bennett
Core Area: Theological & Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course is an introductory survey designed to prepare students for upper division courses in Christian theology. Topics may include the scriptures, history of the Church and/or theology, the nature of theological discourse, introduction to theological terms and definitions, and examination of select topics or issues in theology. Emphasis will be placed on the constitutive dimensions and characteristics of the Roman Catholic tradition.