Courses Linked to the Innovate LLC

2020-2021

Please note: Each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details). All Innovate LLC courses will have an LLC Hour attached to the course from 7 to 8 p.m. on Thursdays.  

ARCH 101: Introduction to Architecture Studio, Experiments in Design Patents

LLC Faculty: Dr. Daniel López-Pérez
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

Have you ever wondered about the processes and factors that shape architectural design? What physical, environmental, social, and spatial forces give rise to our built environment? How can these aspects be explored through the production of physical models, drawings, annotations, and computer aided design? Open to any student, this course offers an introduction to architectural design and the fundamentals of the discipline. Through a series of hands-on individual and collective assignments, students explore the creative processes of drawing, sketching, and model building, in an exciting and highly interactive studio setting. Studio design-work, desk critiques, tutorials, lectures and presentations will serve to discuss a wide range of architectural ideas and issues that form the foundation of the discipline.


BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Rick Gonzalez
Core AreaScientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment. Lecture topics will include cellular respiration and photosynthesis, organismal physiology and locomotion, and ecological interactions. Concurrent registration in BIOL 240L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.


BIOL 242: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Terry Bird
Core AreaScientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms. Concurrent registration in BIOL 242L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.


BIOL 242: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Geoff Morse
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms.

Concurrent registration in BIOL 242L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.


CHEM 151: General Chemistry Lecture

LLC Faculty: Debbie Finocchio, MS
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Part 1 of a two semester lecture course which introduces the fundamental principles of modern chemistry. These principles, which include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, reactivity, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, bonding, acid-base chemistry, redox chemistry, and states of matter, will be used in and expanded upon in more advanced courses. Three lectures weekly.

Concurrent registration in CHEM 151L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.

Course Requirement: Students must have passed the appropriate departmental placement test or must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH 115 or MATH 130 or MATH 150.


CHEM 151: General Chemistry

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lauren Benz
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

As part of the Innovate LLC, General Chemistry I is a foundational course in chemistry that ebgins with the concept of the atom, and includes an introduction to bonding, geometry, and reactivity. With this knowledge in hand, innovative ideas on how to solve big challenges like global warming through chemistry are within reach.

Concurrent registration in CHEM 151L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.

Course Requirement: Students must have passed the appropriate departmental placement test or must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH 115 or MATH 130 or MATH 150.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. David Sullivan
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course examines the development and operations of communication media in the U.S. Course material reviews the interplay among media, economic forces, advertising, technology, government, and audiences. Students should gain an enhanced understanding of the roles media play in individual and collective life in both historical and contemporary contexts.


COMP 110: Computational Problem Solving

LLC Faculty: Dr. Sat Garcia
Core AreaScientific and Technological Inquiry | 3.5 units

An introduction to computational problem solving using the Python programming language. Students will learn the basic elements of programming (e.g. conditionals, loops, inputs/outputs), modular program design, and the basics of data abstraction through object-oriented programming.

Prerequisites: MATH 115 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 150 or MATH 151


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Melissa Gibbons
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Introduction to the field of engineering. Students work in small teams to solve open-ended interdisciplinary design problems, including concept generation, analysis, computer aided design (CAD) modeling, construction, testing, development, and documentation. The project work is enhanced with lectures, activities, and reading on design, manufacturing, and engineering tools. Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Amanda Moulder
Core AreaFirst-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

Fulfills the core curriculum requirement in lower-division writtten literacy for students entering USD in or after the Fall of 201. Develops skills in reading and critical analysis of multiple discourses. Develops writing within multiple discourses, and the transfer of those writing skills to multiple disciplines and occasions. Students practice the entire process for writing, from intial conception, through drafts, to revision and editing. Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed and trained by peer-tutors.


FYW 150: Dystopian Litterature: The Funhouse Mirror of Todays Society

LLC Faculty: Deborah Sundmacher, MA
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

All known societies are structured on certain assumptions about the human condition. Science fiction pushes against the boundaries of these socially constructed assumptions in a way that urges the reader to think critically about what we have come to accept about our world and why.

 


LANG 141: The Italian American Experience

LLC Faculty: Dr. Loredana Di Martino
Core AreaLiterary Inquiry Area; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Wops, Dagoes, Guineas: What is the meaning of these terms? How can a deeper understanding of America's (and San Diego's) immigrant past help us build a better future? Focusing on Italian Americans, this course will reconstruct the experience of those "undesirable" groups that came from Southern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, while examining their changing identity over time. We will discuss important issues related to diversity, inclusion and social justice, while reflecting on the strategies used by writers and filmmakers to challenge discourses about ethnicity that foster oppression. Course taught in English without pre-requisites.


LANG 142: Mythology to Fantasy: East Asian Cinema

LLC Faculty: Dr. Mei Yang
Core AreaLiterary Inquiry Area; Global Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course focuses on the ways in which contemporary fantasy films from East Asia reemploy traditional folk, fairy and other mythological tales to visualize the otherworldly (immortals, demons, monsters, and ghosts). A key question to ask is how the human and humane is understood in traditional tales as well as in digitally made fantasy films. It touches on issues such as the imaginative space of early Asia, the revamp of traditions for a modern and globalized world, the transformative power of popular culture in shaping collective sub-consciousness, and questions about the human species as reflected in eco-cinema.


MATH 110: Cryptography

LLC Faculty: Dr. Cameron Parker
Core AreaMath Reasoning and Problem Solving | 3 units

Throughout history, people have tried to keep their communications unintelligible to unwanted eyes, from war communications in Roman times to ciphers used every day with the exchange of online banking information. This course will study how codes have been made and how they have been broken. In the process basic concepts in many disparate areas of mathemativcs will be investigated. A multidisciplinary approach will be used and the topics of military history, the theory and history of computing, and ethical practices will be incorporated within this mathematics course that satisfies the mathematics core requirement.

Prerequisites: MATH 090 or Passing the appropriate departmental placement test


PPE 101: Morality, Markets and Government

LLC Faculty: Dr. Matt Zwolinski
Core AreaEthical Inquiry | 3 units

This course provides introduction to the interdisciplinary cluster of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. students will be introduced to some of the key intellectual tools from each of these disciplines, and shown how they can be used together to shed light on important theoretical and practical debates in morality, economics, and politics. Topics covered may include the nature and justification of property rights, the uses and limits of market prices in coordinating economic activity, the role of government regulation in correcting market failure, the nature and significance of key moral ideas such as distributive justice, freedom, and equality, and the application of these ideas to key policy debates such as health care, environmental regulation, and social welfare policy.


THRS 113: World Religions in San Diego

LLC Faculty: Dr. Kate DeConnick
Core AreaTheological and Religious Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

How might deeper understanding of religion in today's world lead to more meaningful forms of pluralism and democratic engagement in the United States? This course introduces students to some of the world's "major" religions--Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam--through use of a lived religion approach. We will study the history, texts, and core beliefs/practices of a given faith community as well as how it comes to life in particular ways in San Diego. As part of this course, students work in teams to complete an ethnograhic project, mapping issues and debates relevant to local religious communities.


THRS 119: Christianity - Past, Present, Future

LLC Faculty: Dr. Rico Monge
Core AreaTheological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

What is Christianity? What are the core beliefs that identify Christianity? Beyond their beliefs, what do Christians do and practice? Is it proper to speak of Christianity in the singular? Or is it more accurate to speak of “Christianities”—in the plural? What separates the three largest branches of Christianity--Roman Catholicism, Protestantism, and Eastern Orthodoxy—from each other? Should Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and other marginalized groups be considered Christians as well? Why don’t all Christians share the same Scriptures and rituals? What exactly does it mean to be a Christian anyway?

ARCH 101: Introduction to Architecture Studio, Experiments in Design Patents

LLC Faculty: Dr. Daniel López-Pérez
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

Have you ever wondered about the processes and factors that shape architectural design? What physical, environmental, social, and spatial forces give rise to our built environment? How can these aspects be explored through the production of physical models, drawings, annotations, and computer aided design? Open to any student, this course offers an introduction to architectural design and the fundamentals of the discipline. Through a series of hands-on individual and collective assignments, students explore the creative processes of drawing, sketching, and model building, in an exciting and highly interactive studio setting. Studio design-work, desk critiques, tutorials, lectures and presentations will serve to discuss a wide range of architectural ideas and issues that form the foundation of the discipline.


ARTV 108: Introduction to Video

LLC Faculty: Victoria Fu, MFA
Core AreaArtistic Inquiry | 4 units

This course focuses on individual video art projects, emphasizing experimental over conventional approaches. We examine the representation of time in art by screening contemporary video art and cinema, and also by reading and discussing related texts. In lab, students are introduced to the tools and practices of video art through assigned projects, tutorials and critiques. The course covers production basics including department DSLR cameras, Zoom digital audio recording, and editing image and sound with Adobe Premiere CS6 in post-production. 


BIOL 242: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Geoff Morse
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms.

Concurrent registration in BIOL 242L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.


CHEM 151: General Chemistry Lecture

LLC Faculty: Debbie Finocchio, MS
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Part 1 of a two semester lecture course which introduces the fundamental principles of modern chemistry. These principles, which include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, reactivity, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, bonding, acid-base chemistry, redox chemistry, and states of matter, will be used in and expanded upon in more advanced courses. Three lectures weekly.

Concurrent registration in CHEM 151L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.

Course Requirement: Students must have passed the appropriate departmental placement test or must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in MATH 115 or MATH 130 or MATH 150.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. David Sullivan
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course examines the development and operations of communication media in the U.S. Course material reviews the interplay among media, economic forces, advertising, technology, government, and audiences. Students should gain an enhanced understanding of the roles media play in individual and collective life in both historical and contemporary contexts.


FYW 150: Dystopian Litterature: The Funhouse Mirror of Todays Society

LLC Faculty: Deborah Sundmacher, MA
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

All known societies are structured on certain assumptions about the human condition. Science fiction pushes against the boundaries of these socially constructed assumptions in a way that urges the reader to think critically about what we have come to accept about our world and why. 


PPE 101: Morality, Markets and Government

LLC Faculty: Dr. Matt Zwolinski
Core AreaEthical Inquiry | 3 units

This course provides introduction to the interdisciplinary cluster of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. students will be introduced to some of the key intellectual tools from each of these disciplines, and shown how they can be used together to shed light on important theoretical and practical debates in morality, economics, and politics. Topics covered may include the nature and justification of property rights, the uses and limits of market prices in coordinating economic activity, the role of government regulation in correcting market failure, the nature and significance of key moral ideas such as distributive justice, freedom, and equality, and the application of these ideas to key policy debates such as health care, environmental regulation, and social welfare policy.


THRS 119: Christianity - Past, Present, Future

LLC Faculty: Dr. Rico Monge
Core AreaTheological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

What is Christianity? What are the core beliefs that identify Christianity? Beyond their beliefs, what do Christians do and practice? Is it proper to speak of Christianity in the singular? Or is it more accurate to speak of “Christianities”—in the plural? What separates the three largest branches of Christianity--Roman Catholicism, Protestantism, and Eastern Orthodoxy—from each other? Should Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and other marginalized groups be considered Christians as well? Why don’t all Christians share the same Scriptures and rituals? What exactly does it mean to be a Christian anyway?