Courses Linked to the Cultivate LLC

2020-2021

Please note: Each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details). All LLC Cultivate courses will have an LLC Hour attached to the course from 7 to 8 p.m. on Wednesdays.  

BIOL 242: Genomes and Evolution

LLC FacultyDr. Michael Mayer
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

This course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms. Concurrent registration in BIOL 242L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.


COMM 101: Introduction to Human Communication

LLC Faculty: Dr. Leeva Chung
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Oral Communication Competency | 3 units

This introductory course explores how communication shapes your identity, (non) verbal styles, interpersonal relationships, decision making, and conflict negotiation. The course surveys the breadth of the best practices across the discipline of communication. Healthy, competent communication requires effectiveness, measured by our ways to cultivate initiatives for future generations.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics (2 Sections)

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alyson Ma
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

Have you ever wondered why things happen the way they do? What is the motivation for offering grants to college students? How does the iPhone contribute to the U.S. trade deficit? Why do firms offer new variations of their existing products? How does innovation lead to economic growth? Should price discrimation be allowed? This course is an introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, and an introduction to market structure. We will use the economic framework to interpret real world events and economic policies. The goal of this course is to prepare you to critically judge complex issues facing the world economy.


ENGL 226: Nature Quests

LLC Faculty: Bradley Melekian, MFA
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

In this course, we will examine the genre of quest literature, particularly as it relates to the perceived transformative power of the natural world, and the ways in which authors have examined the interplay between the two. We will examine works that combine the tradition of literary nature writing with the tradition of quest literature, studying the perceived power of excursions into nature as a path to personal development, across fictive and non-fictive genres. Questions central to this course: What emotional states drive people to such quests? What questions do such seekers hope that solitary nature experiences will answer? How does the literature that arises from such experiences lead to a better understanding of self, or, conversely, destroy the concept of self? How does the solitary quest into an often harsh uncaring natural environment forcec contemplation? We will read works ranging from Henry David Thoreau's account of a solitary life in Walden to Jon Krakauer's journalistic investigation of the life of Christopher McCandless in Into the Wild to Cheryl Strayed’s Wild.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC FacultyDr. Diana Chen
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

Introduction to the field of engineering. Students work in small teams to solve open-ended interdisciplinary design problems, including concept generation, analysis, computer aided design (CAD) modeling, construction, testing, development, and documentation. The project work is enhanced with lectures, activities, and reading on design, manufacturing, and engineering tools. Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering. Four hours lecture-labratory weekly.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


EOSC 105: Natural Disasters with Lab

LLC FacultyDr. Zhi-Yong Yin
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry; Quantitative Reasoning Competency | 4 unit class w/ lab

This course will give students an introduction to the earth and the dynamic natural processes that impact humanity and life in general. Human society and nature are becoming increasingly intertwined as the human race continues to proliferate. This course will emphasize the fundamental scientific principles and processes related to natural disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, severe weather, hurricanes, meteorite impacts, and climate change. Historic catastrophes will be emphasized. This course includes a weekly lab, in which students will learn to identify rocks and minerals, employ map skills to study faults, coastal erosion, landslides, flooding, and other natural hazards, and interpret meteorological and climate data. Natural hazards in San Diego will be examined through local field trips. This course has a mandatory weekend field trip. This course satisfies the CORE requirements of Science/Technology Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning.

Lab section taught by Eric Cathcart, MS.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Lisa Smith, MA
Core Area: 
First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

Students read and explore works of fiction and non-fiction (Carson, McCarthy, Murakami, Hersey) that examine the disastrous effects of human scientific "achievement" on the environment and consider the ways writers, through these varied discourses, reveal and predict many current (and possibly future) outcomes and how these works can serve as cautionary tales for us in the present moment. We think about the importance of cultivating the imagination and bringing it to bear on the past and future in order to find solutions to our current dilemmas.


LANG 141: Narratives of the Mexico-US Border

LLC FacultyDr. Amanda Petersen
Core Area: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This special-topic course explores the cultural productions of the border in narratives in order to encourage students to critically reflect on the space of the Mexico-US border, a space that is essential for understanding what it means to study in San Diego. Students will analyze narratives from the regions suurrounding the border, from both northern Mexico and the US. The narratives reveal the depth and diversity of the experience of living on and around the borderlands. Questions of privilege and the social injustices that they cause will be central for in-class discussions.


PHYS 270: Introduction to Mechanics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Ryan McGorty
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

A study of the fundamental principles of how things move involving Newton's laws of motion and momentum and energy conservation laws. Harmonic oscillations and wave motion will also be covered. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 270L required

Course Requirement: Students must have completed MATH 150 or MATH 151 to qualify for this LLC course.


THRS 114: Spirituality and Struggle

LLC FacultyDr. Victor Carmona
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course is an introduction to two of the most beautiful challenges that lie at the heart of theological reflection: the struggle of making sense of historically-bound experiences of God and the struggle for peace and justice that such experiences move many to take up. Therefore, this course is an opportunity to think critically about your spirituality and struggles as you cultivate your path.

For a complete list of Spring 2021 Cultivate LLC courses, their core attributes, and class dates & times, please use this linked document. (Coming soon.)

BIOL 113: Plants and People w/ Lab

LLC Faculty: Marcy Darby, MS
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

 What are the major ways that plants and plant products contribute to human life and how have humans modified plants and their environments? Biology 113, Plants and People, is a one-semester course (Science and Technological Inquiry Core Area) that endeavors to answer these questions. It is about humans and their knowledge, uses, and abuses of plants. The biology of plants is considered from a scientific viewpoint; drawing on topics of anatomy, morphology, physiology, ecology, evolution, taxonomy, and biotechnology. The basis of this course is science literacy, defined as citizen-level fluency for comprehending the process through which science’s way of knowing brings understanding of the natural world. 


COMM 101: Introduction to Human Communication

LLC Faculty: Dr. Leeva Chung
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Oral Communication Competency | 3 units

This introductory course explores how communication shapes your identity, (non) verbal styles, interpersonal relationships, decision making, and conflict negotiation. The course surveys the breadth of the best practices across the discipline of communication. Healthy, competent communication requires effectiveness, measured by our ways to cultivate initiatives for future generations.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics (2 Sections)

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alyson Ma
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

Have you ever wondered why things happen the way they do? What is the motivation for offering grants to college students? How does the iPhone contribute to the U.S. trade deficit? Why do firms offer new variations of their existing products? How does innovation lead to economic growth? Should price discrimation be allowed? This course is an introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, and an introduction to market structure. We will use the economic framework to interpret real world events and economic policies. The goal of this course is to prepare you to critically judge complex issues facing the world economy.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Lisa Smith, MA
Core Area: 
First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

Students read and explore works of fiction and non-fiction (Carson, McCarthy, Murakami, Hersey) that examine the disastrous effects of human scientific "achievement" on the environment and consider the ways writers, through these varied discourses, reveal and predict many current (and possibly future) outcomes and how these works can serve as cautionary tales for us in the present moment. We think about the importance of cultivating the imagination and bringing it to bear on the past and future in order to find solutions to our current dilemmas.


LANG 141: Narratives of the Mexico-US Border

LLC FacultyDr. Amanda Petersen
Core Area: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This special-topic course explores the cultural productions of the border in narratives in order to encourage students to critically reflect on the space of the Mexico-US border, a space that is essential for understanding what it means to study in San Diego. Students will analyze narratives from the regions suurrounding the border, from both northern Mexico and the US. The narratives reveal the depth and diversity of the experience of living on and around the borderlands. Questions of privilege and the social injustices that they cause will be central for in-class discussions.


PHYS 270: Introduction to Mechanics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Ryan McGorty
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

A study of the fundamental principles of how things move involving Newton's laws of motion and momentum and energy conservation laws. Harmonic oscillations and wave motion will also be covered. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 270L required

Course Requirement: Students must have completed MATH 150 or MATH 151 to qualify for this LLC course.


THRS 114: Spirituality and Struggle

LLC FacultyDr. Victor Carmona
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units

This course is an introduction to two of the most beautiful challenges that lie at the heart of theological reflection: the struggle of making sense of historically-bound experiences of God and the struggle for peace and justice that such experiences move many to take up. Therefore, this course is an opportunity to think critically about your spirituality and struggles as you cultivate your path.