Course Descriptions

Fall 2013 Intellectual Property Law Class Descriptions

Corporate Counsel Internship (Stacey Tyree)
LWVL591

1-3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

The Corporate Counsel Internship Program consists of a work component and a class component. The Corporate Counsel Internship Program allows students to receive academic credit for working in the legal department of a corporation, company or other business entity. Students may also work in other departments of a corporation as long as they are supervised by a licensed attorney. The goal of the Program is to provide students with the opportunity to observe first-hand the operations of a corporate legal department and to gain an understanding of the legal issues addressed by corporate counsel. The student must not receive monetary compensation or any outside funding for or related to the work and must be supervised by an on-site lawyer. Students can secure their own internship placements or meet with the Internship Director or Career Services for guidance. Placements qualify for the Program only if the organization requires that a student receive academic credit as a condition of the internship. Organizations willing to pay students or to have them work on a volunteer basis do not qualify for the Program. After a placement is found, students must complete an Application Form to have their placement approved for the Program. Employers who participate in the Program must commit to the requirements of the Program. Students work a minimum of 60 hours per unit of credit and may receive 1-3 credits. Students participate in primarily on-line class sessions involving small group discussions, prepare weekly summaries of their work and complete a writing assignment. If you have been accepted into an internship placement and want to apply for the internship course, fill out the Corporate Counsel application. If you have any other questions, email Lizzette Herrera Castellanos or call (619) 260-2342. The internship is graded on a Pass-Fail basis.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the JD concentrations web pages for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your work in this internship qualifies for the concentration.
Additional Information: JD Concentrations Web Page, Email Law Student Affairs

Entertainment, Sports and Intellectual Property Internship Program (Stacey Tyree)
LWVL592

1 - 3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

The Entertainment, Sports and Intellectual Property Internship Program consists of a work component and a class component and allows students to earn academic credit for working in a law department of an entertainment or sports industry company, talent guild or trade association, or in the intellectual property law department of a company or trade association. Students work a minimum of 60 hours per unit of credit and may receive 1-3 credits. Students participate in primarily online class sessions involving small group discussions, prepare weekly summaries of their work and complete a writing assignment. If you have been accepted into an internship placement and want to apply for the internship course, fill out the ESIP application below. The Internship is graded on a Pass-Fail basis. If you have any other questions, email Lizzette Herrera Castellanos at lizzette.herrera@sandiego.edu or call (619) 260-2342.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your work in this clinic qualifies for the concentration.
Additional Information: ESIP Application, Intellectual Property Concentration

Intellectual Property Law Clinic (Dana Robinson, Ted Sichelman)
LWVL532

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

This course places students at local law firms to provide legal assistance to a wide variety of technology companies, independent inventors, artists, musicians, and others in need of pro bono IP work in the areas of patent and trademark prosecution as well as licensing and litigation in all IP fields. Students will be supervised by attorneys at local law firms as well as the professors. The course will begin with 5-6 weeks of class sessions covering the core types of transactions encountered in technology startups. There are no scheduled classes during the remainder of the semester; instead, students will work with clients and supervising lawyers each week, and meet one-on-one with the professors on a regular basis. An application process will be used to select students for the course. Students may only begin the course in the fall semester, and may continue in the spring semester, but are not required to do so. Interested students may also apply to both the Technology Entrepreneurship Clinic, but will be selected for only one clinic. The course application and additional course information will be emailed no later than Friday, March 29, 2013. Students who do not receive an application by then, or who have questions about the course after reviewing the application, may email Professor Ted Sichelman, tsichelman@sandiego.edu. The deadline to submit an application for this course is Friday, April 19, 2013.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information.

Intellectual Property Survey (Lisa P. Ramsey)
LWIP550

4 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

This course provides a broad overview of intellectual property law. After discussing the policies underlying the protection of intellectual property rights, we will cover trade secret, patent, copyright, and trademark law, and related doctrines such as the right of publicity. These topics will be examined with a focus on new technologies, but a science or technical background is not required. This course provides a foundation for advanced intellectual property courses and is also appropriate for students who seek only a general understanding of intellectual property law. The grade will be based on a final examination.

Note: May be applied as part of the six required credits for the Intellectual Property Concentration (JD).

Media Law (Junichi P. Semitsu)
LWIP565

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

This course presents the legal and policy overview of the key cases, legislation, and technologies affecting communications in the United States. Students will be exposed to a survey of five major areas of media law: governmental speech regulation (e.g., obscenity, prior restraint, indecency), defamation, privacy torts, news gathering rights, and copyright and fair use. But this course can also be seen as an advanced First Amendment course concentrated on the interplay between “new” media, cutting-edge technologies, privacy, and other civil liberties. While most of the assigned cases focus on print and broadcast media, discussion topics will run the gamut from Wikileaks to TMZ, from crush videos to baseball cards, and from Nicole Richie’s fleeting expletives on Fox to Courtney Love’s disparaging rants on Twitter, leaving time to canvass the legal pitfalls awaiting YouTube when a user uploads an excerpt of the German film Downfall with the subtitles modified to suggest that Adolf Hitler is enraged about Jeremy Lin’s success. One oft-explored question will be whether today’s communication laws—some established before most Americans had a home computer or cable television—hold up in the face of emerging technologies and media platforms. By analyzing Pamela Anderson’s privacy rights, Gizmodo bloggers’ news gathering rights, and Voyeur Dorm’s speech rights, students will learn to help clients with communications and media issues in the post-Facebook era. While there are no formal prerequisites for the course, a prior knowledge of torts, constitutional law, and some basic intellectual property concepts might be helpful. The final course grade will be based on a final exam and class participation.

Patent Law (Ted Sichelman)
LWIP570

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

Patent law generally concerns the provision and enforcement of rights for novel, non-obvious, and useful inventions. This course will cover (1) the legal requirements and process to obtain a U.S. patent (i.e., patent prosecution); (2) methods of valuing, selling, and licensing patent rights; (3) patent litigation; and (4) public policy issues, particularly the role patents play in technological innovation and recent efforts to "reform" the patent laws. In addition to readings from a casebook, course materials will include actual documents from patent prosecution, licensing, and litigation matters. Thus, students will not only learn patent law doctrine, but will be introduced to the types of work done by practicing patent lawyers. No science or engineering background is required, nor important, for the course. Introduction to IP or previous work experience with basic patent law is recommended but not required. Grades will be assigned on the basis of a take home final exam.

Note: May be applied as part of the six required credits for the Intellectual Property Concentration (JD).

Patent Litigation I (Michael M. Rosen, Michael Amon, Christopher Marchese)
LWIP568

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Patent Law or concurrent enrollment

The patent litigation course provides substantive patent law knowledge with a focus on the practical application and litigation skills. This course is appropriate for students who have taken or are taking patent law and other intellectual property courses and who are seeking to deepen and refine their understanding of how patent litigation actually works. This course will be of particular interest to students who envision practicing in the areas of patent litigation or patent prosecution. Previous coursework in general patent law is recommended but not required. Patent Law is a pre-or-co-requisite.The course is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis

Tech Entrepreneurship Law Clinic (Ted Sichelman)
LWVL570

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

This course places students at local law firms to provide legal assistance to local technology startups in the areas of intellectual property prosecution and licensing, corporate formation and transactions, contracts, employment, and related areas. Students will be supervised by attorneys at local law firms as well as the professor. The course will begin with 4-5 weeks of class sessions covering the core types of transactions encountered in technology startups. There are no scheduled classes during the remainder of the semester; instead, students will work with the companies and supervising lawyers each week, and meet one-on-one with the professor on a regular basis. An application process will be used to select students for the course. Students who registered for the course during 2011-12 or 2012-13 may not apply for the course for 2013-14. Students may only begin the course in the fall semester, and may continue in the spring semester, but are not required to do so. Students interested in IP issues may apply to both the Technology Entrepreneurship Clinic and the IP Law Clinic, but will be selected for only one clinic. The course application and additional course information will be emailed no later than Friday, March 29, 2013. Students who do not receive an application by then, or who have questions about the course after reviewing the application, may email Professor Ted Sichelman, tsichelman@sandiego.edu. The deadline to submit an application for this course is Friday, April 19, 2013.


Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the JD concentration web pages for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your work in this clinic qualifies for the concentration.
Additional Information: JD Concentrations Web Page, Email Law Student Affairs

View by Semester

Click on a semester below, then narrow your search by choosing a sub-item.