Short-Term Opportunities

The Second Year Experience (SYE) Abroad program is an innovative and comprehensive international experience open to sophomore students at the University of San Diego. Students apply during their first year and will travel together with their cohort during the intersession of their sophomore year. After being enrolled in the program, all students will participate in fall seminars (to take place in the fall semester prior to departure) in preparation for their time abroad. Please see below for more details about this unique and exciting program.

SYE 2021 Applications

Applications will open in December 2019 and will be due on April 1, 2020.

General SYE Abroad Information

Academic Component:

While abroad, students take one three-unit academic course taught by a USD faculty member (see below for course offerings in each location). Each course will fulfill a core curriculum requirement.

Intercultural Component:

Students will be assigned to an Intercultural Group. These groups will be organized and led by current USD administrators and staff who will meet with the students prior to departure, on-site in each location, and at USD upon return. Within these groups students will participate in cultural and social activities both in San Diego and abroad.

Program Cost:

Please check the program below for cost information as this depends on the course students take while abroad.  This cost includes tuition, housing, class-related activities abroad, cultural activities abroad, excursions, some meals, and international health insurance.

Logistics:

Details regarding program housing and calendar for each location will be made available to all enrolled students in the Fall prior to their departure.

Eligibility:

Students must be in good academic and conduct standing with USD. Students participating in this program must have sophomore standing (completed three semesters prior to traveling abroad in January).

Students in the Class of 2023 will be able to select from either Auckland, New Zealand or Florence, Italy.

Application Deadline and Program Timeline:

  • Application deadline: April 1, 2020
  • Kick-off event: May 14, 2020
  • Mandatory Fall Seminars: Students will be required to attend three mandatory fall seminars in Fall 2020 (confirmed dates, times, and locations will be sent to enrolled students) 

SYE Abroad Locations and Applications

Florence, Italy - Explore: Relive the Renaissance

Florence is known as the birthplace of the Renaissance and, as such, has a rich cultural history. Students will have the opportunity to explore the city through its art and architecture preserved among the cobblestone streets.

Cost:

The cost to participate in the SYE Florence program depends on the course students take.  The cost for the ENGL, HIST, MKTG, POLS and THRS courses is $5625. The cost for the CHEM course is $5825. This cost includes tuition, housing, some meals, course activities and some cultural activities.

Courses Offered in Florence:

Course Fulfills
CHEM 111: The Evolution of Chemistry - From Alchemy to Atoms and Beyond (4 units)  Scientific & Tech Inquiry w/lab (ESTI)
ENGL 236: English and American Writers in Florence Literary Inquiry (ELTI)
HIST 145: Renaissance Florence Critical Thinking and Information Literacy/Historical Inquiry
MKTG 300: Principles of Marketing (3 units) Required for all BBA majors in School of Business and fulfills Oral Communication (CORL)
POLS 346: Politics and Culture of Sustainable Food (3 units) Diversity, Inclusion and Social Justice (DISJ)
THRS 350: Christian Spirituality (3 units)  Theology & Religious Inquiry (FTRI)

 

Auckland, New Zealand - Discover: South Pacific Past and Present

Auckland is the world's largest Polynesian city and is a true melting pot of various cultures. Students will have the opportunity to explore the city's traditions through introductions to the rich Māori culture and the various natural beauty throughout the region.

Cost:

The cost to participate in the Auckland SYE Abroad program depends on the course students take.  MGMT and THRS courses cost $5325. The cost for the CHEM course is $5525 and the cost for the ECON course is $6150. This cost includes tuition, housing, some meals, course activities and some cultural activities.

Courses Offered in Auckland:

Course Fulfills

CHEM 102: Science of Food and Cooking (3 units)

Science & Tech Inquiry w/lab (ESTI)

ECON 216: Statistics for Business & Economics (4 units)

Quantitive Reasoning (CQUR)
ENGL 364: Literature of the Global South (3 units) Literary Inquiry (ELTI)
MGMT 300: Organizational Behavior (3 units)  Required for all BBA majors in the School of Business 
THRS 112: Introduction to World Religions (3 units) Theology & Religious Inquiry (FTRI)

 

 

The University of San Diego offers an impressive number of short-term programs during the summer session. These programs are offered in various international locations and are all taught by USD faculty members. Program locations and courses change periodically.

The tuition cost for these programs is subsidized by the university and USD International Center scholarships as well as outside scholarships are available.

The program cost ranges and includes the following: three to four units of USD tuition, housing, excursions, class related visits, medical insurance, and some group meals. Some programs offer students the option to take up to 6 units. Some additional fees may apply based on the course. For complete information on the program details, please click on the program link to be directed to the program-specific brochure page.

Summer 2020

Applications for Summer 2020 will open in mid-November 2019. Stay tuned!

For more information on the program, click on the location listed under the "Program" heading. For course descriptions, please click on the course.

Program Course(s) Offered Professor Cost

Austria, Salzburg

June 2020

GERM 201: Third Semester German Dr. Christiane Staninger  $5150

China, Beijing/Xian/Hangzhou & Shanghai 

June 10 - June 28, 2020

HIST 364: China - A Historical Journey Dr. Yi Sun $5450 

China, Shanghai

June 2020 - 1 week at USD, 2 weeks in Shanghai

Note: Students may take up to 6 units (both courses)

DSCI 300: Prescriptive Business Analytics

DSCI 303: Operations Management

Dr. Daniel Lin

Dr. Sandy Shi

$4950 (3 units)

$7350 (6 units)

England, London

July7 - July 26, 2020

 

 

CHEM 102: Science of Food & Cooking Prof. Debbie Finocchio

$5250

$5450 (CHEM & THEA) 

COMM 494: The Media Audience Dr. Bradley Bond
COMP 494: Data Mining Dr. Eric Jiang
ECON 333: International Economics Dr. Alyson Ma
ENGL/THEA 367: London Plays in Production Dr. Cynthia Caywood/Dr. David Hay
FINA 402: Investments Dr. Biljana Adebambo
PHIL 331: Biomedical Ethics Dr. Gary Jones
POLS 492/594: The US-UK "Special" Relationship Dr. Vidya Nadkarni

France, Paris

FREN 201: June 7-July 3, 2020

ALL OTHER COURSES:
June 14 - July 3, 2020


NOTE: FREN 201 is 4 week course, All other courses are 3 weeks

 

COMM 338: Media & Conflict - Paris, Protest, Pluralism and Nationalism Dr. Esteban Del Rio

$5650 (FREN 201) 

$5350

 

FREN 201: Third Semester French Dr. Michele Magnin
ISYE 480: Data Science and Analytics Dr. Jae Kim
MENG 465: Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics Dr. Imane Khalil
PHIL 116: Power, Freedom and Equality - French Philosophy and War Dr. Michael Kelly
THRS 323: War and Peace in the Christian Tradition Dr. Emily Reimer-Barry

Indonesia, Bali

May 31 - June 21, 2020

 

EOSC 303/PHIL 344: Paradise Lost? Environmental Issues in Bali

MUSC 341/THRS 326: Religion and the Performing Arts in Bali

Dr. Mark Woods/Dr. Ron Kaufmann

Dr. David Harnish/Dr. Lance Nelson

$5150 

 Italy, Rome

PSYC: June 10 - July 1, 2020

INST: June 13 - July 4, 2020

PSYC 364: Sport Psychology

INST 352: Religion and Revolutionary Science

Dr. Nadav Goldschmied

Dr. Andrew Nosal/Dr. Rico Monge

$5050 

 

Italy, Salerno

ITAL: May 31 - June 27, 2020

EOSC/ENGL: May 31 - June 21, 2020

ITAL 201: Third Semester Italian

EOSC 111: Geosciences Abroad - Volcanoes of Italy

ENGL 364: Literature and Landscape

Dr. Antonio Iannotta

Dr. Beth O'Shea

Dr. Atreyee Phukan

$5450 (ITAL 201) 

$6050 (EOSC - 4 units)

$5250 (ENGL)

South Africa, Johannesburg/Makuleke

July 17 - August 1, 2019

POLS 343/SOCI 375: Education, Citizenship, and Politics in South Africa

Dr. Mike Williams

Dr. Lisa Nunn

$5,250

U.S.- Hawaii, Hilo/Kona

On Campus at USD: July 30-31 and August 9-21, 2020

Hawaii: August 1 - 8, 2020

ENGR 110: The Design of Coffee

Dr.Truc Ngo

 $4350

Summer 2020 Course Descriptions

Austria - Salzburg

GERM 201- Third Semester German
Professor: Dr. Christiane Staninger
Core Curriculum Information: Fulfills second language competency

This course is a continuation of German 102 and is designed to teach students to speak, read, and write German at an intermediate level and enhance students’ familiarity with recent German culture and history. Emphasis is placed on improving students’ knowledge of intermediate grammar, reading more complex tests and speaking with moderate proficiency.


China - Beijing, Xian, Hangzhou & Shanghai

HIST 364- China: A Historical Journey
Professor: Dr. Yi Sun
Core Curriculum Information: Fulfills Historical Inquiry and Global Diversity Level 1

Students with an interest in Chinese culture, history, and politics will enjoy this short-term program. Excursions to historical sites throughout the program give students a greater cultural appreciation and understanding for this rapidly changing society.

This class is designed to provide a sophisticated and interdisciplinary introduction to Chinese civilization and politics.   The program follows a three week itinerary that includes Beijing, Xian, and at least two other destinations in China, taking advantage of site tours and local academic experts above and beyond accompanying faculty led discussions and presentations.  Students will have an opportunity to witness the changes that have been unfolding in China over the past twenty five years while at the same time appreciating the cultural foundation of the society produced over the course of more than two millennia. Course content will devote substantial attention to Chinese relations with the many countries in its neighborhood and its ever increasing significance around the globe. Ultimately, the class is intended to foster a sense of cultural awareness and understanding of the Chinese historical experience.


China - Shanghai

DSCI 300 - Prescriptive Business Analytics
Professor: Dr. Daniel Lin
Core Curriculum Information: Quantitative Reasoning 

Prescriptive business analytics focuses on helping decision makers solve complex business problems. Students develop skills necessary to define, analyze, and solve problems in all areas of business including operations, marketing, and finance. Students utilize spreadsheets to model, analyze, and develop solution alternatives for a variety of business problems. Among the tools students utilize are modeling, influence diagrams, decision trees, Monte Carlo simulation, optimization techniques, and sensitivity analysis.

DSCI 303 - Operations Management
Professor: Dr. Sandy Shi

Students employ a managerial perspective to develop a strategic view of operations and supply chain management in a wide range of contemporary contexts (with a primary focus on process management within and across organizations). Students develop critical skills and master material relating to the fundamental role played by operations in the competitive performance of an organization. Among the critical skills and areas of mastery students develop are process analysis, process design, process improvement, supply chain management, capacity planning & control, inventory management, quality planning, quality control, strategic improvement techniques and risk management. The course incorporates concerns for corporate social responsibility.


England - London

CHEM 102: Science of Food and Cooking
Professor: Prof. Debbie Finnochio
Core Curriculum Information: Science and Technological Inquiry

There is perhaps no easier way to learn about a culture than through its food! With its wide-ranging international influences, London is considered one of the culinary capitals of the world. This – combined with its traditional offerings – makes London a perfect city to host “The Science of Food and Cooking”. This course connects students to chemistry concepts via food, and is structured around food themes that are perfectly showcased in London.

COMM 494 - The Media Audience
Professor: Dr. Bradley Bond

The Media Audience is a course that will allow students to use communication and social psychology concepts/theories to better understand why audiences are drawn to media figures. The objective of the course is to teach students to analyze how audiences cognitively process relationships with fictional characters and celebrities. London is an ideal location for the course because dissecting the psychology of media audiences utilizing British media personae will provide nuanced examples for class readings and discussions that can then be extracted into class excursions throughout the city. Each topic will be introduced with general readings explicating the concepts/theories. Students will take course excursions to visit London-based sites that can help illuminate the importance of media figures to entertainment, culture, tourism, and audiences’ social networks.

COMP 494: Data Mining
Professor: Dr. Eric Jiang

Data mining is a new interdisciplinary field of computer science and represents a process of analyzing and extracting patters embedded in large amounts of data by using various methods from machine learning, statistics and database management. With the rapid proliferation of the Internet and advances of computing technology and applications in artificial intelligence, data mining has become an increasingly important tool of transforming large quantities of digital data into meaningful and actionable information in many areas including business and finance, health care, telecommunication, science, engineering, and higher education. The course provides a comprehensive introduction to data mining with a primary focus on fundamental concepts, algorithms and applications of association analysis, classification and clustering modeling. It will also discuss ethical issues related to data mining and advanced data mining models.

ECON 333: International Economics
Professor: Dr. Alyson Ma

The theory, practice, and institutions of the international economy. Topics include international trade and investment, balance of payments, foreign exchange rate determination, multinational enterprises, trade with developing countries, and international economic policy.

ENGL/THEA 367: London Plays in Production
Professors: Dr. Cynthia Caywood and Dr. David Hay
Core Curriculum Information: Literary or Artistic Inquiry and Advanced Integration

ENGL 367/THEA 367 is an interdisciplinary course taught in London by one faculty member from English and one from Theatre. It will introduce students to the wide diversity of London theatre in what is arguably the theatre capital of the English-speaking world. Students will read a variety of scripts and see a range of productions in an assortment of venues. In addition, students will participate in field trips designed to provide background, history and context for their theatre experience. Class discussion, two essays, field trips, the integrative core project and the final exam will underscore the interdisciplinary and integrative focus of our study. Students enrolled in ENGL 367 will satisfy core requirements for Literary Inquiry and Advanced Integration. Students enrolled in THEA 367 will satisfy core requirements for Artistic Inquiry and Advanced Integration.

FINA 402: Investments
Professor: Dr. Biljana Adebambo

This course surveys the basic principles and techniques of security and investment analysis. It covers capital markets, stocks, fixed-income portfolios, options, futures contracts and other derivatives. Market analysis methods are examined, and sources of analytical information and their use are studied.

PHIL 331: Biomedical Ethics
Professor: Dr. Gary Jones
Core Curriculum Information: Ethical Inquiry 

A systematic examination of ethical principles as they apply to issues in medicine and scientific research, that is: mercy killing; abortion; experimentation on human subjects; allocation of scarce medical resources; organ transplants; and behavior modification. Moral obligations connected with the roles of nurse, doctor, etc., will receive special attention.


POLS 492/594: The US-UK "Special" Relationship 
Professor: Dr. Vidya Nadkarni
Core Curriculum Information: Social and Behavioral Inquiry 

This course will cover the US-UK relationship from historical and political perspectives. From a colonial and subservient relationship during the pre-revolutionary period to one of hostility during the revolutionary and Civil War periods, the bilateral relationship took on special meaning in the 20th century as President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who was convinced that the security of the United States was inextricably linked with that of Britain, moved gradually to cement an Anglo-American alliance during World War II. As this course will examine the nature of the “special relationship” between the United States and the United Kingdom, London provides the ideal setting for examining this subject. London offers a unique historical laboratory for exploring the themes that will be covered in this course.  Among the many sites of interest are: the Benjamin Franklin House, the War Rooms in the Imperial War Museum, the British Museum’s North America collections, the US Embassy, British Foreign Office, the Eccles Centre for American Studies in the British Library, the Old Embassy at 1 Grosvenor Square which served as the headquarters for General (later President) Eisenhower during World War II, and the National Portrait Gallery.


France - Paris

COMM 338: Media & Conflict - Paris, Protest, Pluralism and Nationalism
Professor: Dr. Esteban Del Rio
Core Curriculum Information: Domestic Diversity Level 2

This course begins with the idea that the national tradition of revolution and dialectic between right and left in France carries through from 1789, through responses to Charlie Hebdo in 2015. We focus in on how immigrants, people of color, women, and other groups experiencing marginalization fit within French national and transnational/transatlantic flows, drawing connections between authority, difference, and media from the U.S. to the E.U. The
course readings include general theory (eg. journalism theory), transnational case study (eg. War on Terror), and case studies from the French and Parisian context (Farmer’s protest of GMOs, Mai 1968, Suburban riots of 2005 and 2007, Charlie Hebdo,e tc). The negotiation of power and difference is a site of study and individual reflection for students. We use the French
context by taking walking tours of protest sites, visiting museums to illustrate the construction of memory, experiencing and visiting French food sites to think about global resistance to factory farming, etc.

FREN 201: Third Semester French
Professor: Dr. Michele Magnin
Core Curriculum Information: Oral Competency

Completes the introduction of the basic structures of the language, with increased emphasis on grammatical exactness to further develop communicative proficiency. At this level students are encouraged to participate in community service-learning and/or cultural activities within the French-speaking community. Students in this course will live with host families in Paris.

MENG 465: Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
Professor: Dr. Imane Khalil

Topics in fluid mechanics, including the differential description of fluid flow, its application to channel flow, pipe flow, and boundary layers, scaling of the equations, methods in computational fluid dynamics, and an introduction to turbulence.

PHIL 116: Power, Freedom and Equality - French Philosophy and War
Professor: Dr. Michael Kelly
Core Curriculum Information: Ethical Inquiry 


This course aims to provide a thorough introduction to key themes in ethics and political philosophy, i.e., morality and justice. Students will be introduced to foundational questions in ethics such as: why be moral? What is the nature of the good and the good life? What are our duties to other humans? To animals? To ourselves? Students will also be introduced to foundational questions concerning justice: when, if ever, is paternalism justified? What is the moral justification of punishment? How far to our speech rights extend? Are their expressive harms that the state should regulate, like hate speech? What are our duties, if any, to persons in other nations suffering from economic deprivation and starvation?

THRS 323: War and Peace in the Christian Tradition
Professor: Dr. Emily Reimer-Barry
Core Curriculum Information: Ethical Inquiry or Theological/Religous Inquiry


An examination of the three dominant paradigms for thinking about war and peace in the Christian tradition: holy war, pacifism, and just war. We will consider how these frameworks are employed today in both religious and secular contexts as we apply these frameworks to the evaluation of particular conflicts/issues, which may include: the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, humanitarian interventions, the ‘war on terrorism,’ preemptive and preventive war, drones, weapons of mass destruction, and care for veterans. Throughout, students will build skills in ethical analysis and reflexivity. Students may not receive credit for both THRS 123 and THRS 323


Indonesia - Bali

MUSC 341 / THRS 326: Religion and the Performing Arts in Bali
Professors: Dr. David Harnish & Dr. Lance Nelson
Core Curriculum Information: Artistic Inquiry or Theological and Religious Inquiry. Also fulfills Global Diversity 1 and Advanced Integration

In addition to its renowned physical beauty, Bali is famous for its rich cultural traditions that demonstrate an inseparable relationship between art and religion. This interdisciplinary, team-taught course will integrate the perspectives of religious studies, music, and ethnomusicology. We will explore the faith and practices of Balinese Hindus and examine the complex integration of music, dance, drama, and other arts in their vibrant ritual life. Emphasis will be placed on indigenous, colonial, and neocolonial expressions of cultural, social, and economic power and privilege on the island. The powerful influence of tourism on the cultural life and ecology of this small island will also be addressed. 

Guest lectures and workshops by local scholars, religious practitioners, and master-artists will be arranged. We will attend temple festivals and ceremonies and take tours to cultural sites around the island. Students will learn the rudiments of playing gamelan (gong ensemble) music as a group and engage one or more other arts, such as dance and shadow puppetry. The course will be enriched by close interaction with Dr. Kaufmann and Dr. Woods, and the students of their environmental studies course. Evaluation will be by journals, several quizzes, and a 12-15 page research paper to be completed upon the students’ return to the United States. Students will also be evaluated on their level of participation and culturally respectful behavior.
 
EOSC 303 / PHIL 344: Paradise Lost? Environmental Issues in Bali
Professors: Dr. Ron Kaufmann & Dr. Mark Woods
Core Curriculum Information: Fulfills Global Diversity 1 or Ethical Inquiry
 
This team-taught upper-division course will explore significant environmental issues in Bali, an Indonesian island whose considerable natural resources present tremendous opportunities and simultaneously pose daunting challenges. Responses to environmental problems are informed by many factors and are especially complicated when social, cultural, political, economic, scientific and ethical factors need to be considered.This interdisciplinary team-taught course will focus on current environmental issues confronting Bali. Important topics will include the impacts of tourism and development; waste and its disposal; availability of fresh water; conservation of natural resources, including coral reefs. Students will register for EOSC 303 or PHIL 344, according to the credit they need. Class sessions and field trips will involve the entire group.

This course will explore pressing environmental issues in Bali today. Guest lectures by local scholars and environmental activists will be arranged. Students will visit sites that illustrate environmental challenges and meet with organizations that address some of Bali’s most pressing environmental concerns. Students will have hands-on opportunities to work on local projects and interact with community members who are actively engaged with environmental problems.

Italy - Rome

PSYC 364: Sport Psychology
Professor: Dr. Nadav Goldschmied 

This course examines the psychological factors influencing the experience of sports. Topics include theoretical basis of competition, motivation, group dynamics, aggression, fan behavior, and social facilitation. The Sport Psychology course in Rome aims to explore psychological factors that affect, and are affected, by sports participation and performance, as well as health and wellness. 

INST 352: Religion and Revolutionary Science
Professor: Dr. Andrew Nosal and Dr. Rico Monge
Core Curriculum Information: Theological and Relgious Inquiry and Advanced Integration

This course prepares students for leadership in an increasingly globalized and technological world, by developing literacy in and engaging in meaningful dialogue on contemporary issues spanning the boundaries of science and religion, within the context of multi-faith diversity. This course will introduce foundational material about the relationship between science and religion and engage students in constructive discussions on controversial topics including origins, creation and evolution, free will, religious attitudes toward nature, the science of religious experience, miracles, political conflict between science and religion, scientism and ‘new atheism’. Students will be exposed to influential thinkers representing various religious, philosophical, and scientific worldviews


Italy - Salerno

ITAL 201: Third Semester Italian
Professor: Dr. Antonio Iannotta
Core Curriculum Information: Fulfills Second Language competency

This four-week summer program in Italy is taught by a USD faculty member, and covers the same content as Italian 201 while blending language and culture with experiential learning. Students will be fully immersed in Italian daily life and will live with Italian families. The academic component will be supplemented with community engagement activities and field trips that will enhance students’ learning and understanding of Italy while allowing them to interact with the local community.  Salerno is the ideal location for students to be familiarized with Italian culture, and experience Southern Italian warmth, while having easy access to some of Italy’s most famous heritage sites. Students will be guided by their instructor to make the most of their experience in Italy.

EOSC 111: Geosciences Abroad - Volcanoes of Italy (4 units)
Professor: Dr. Beth O'Shea
Core Curriculum Information: Science and Technological Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning

How do volcanoes, soils, and groundwater resources influence cities; both ancient and modern? Why are the ruins of some civilizations well preserved whereas others are lost forever? How do geologic processes influence human migration? These questions form the basis of one central theme: the interaction of geology and human civilization. Italy boasts some of the best-preserved remnants of ancient civilizations, is host to modern active volcanoes (Vesuvius, Etna, Stromboli), and of course, is well-known for its fertile soils that produce world famous wines. But did you know that geologic processes have also contributed to significant Italian migration, and even influenced invasion strategies in Italy during World War II? This course is a 4-unit lab course for non-majors, set in Italy. Students will be exposed to the fundamental concepts in geoscience, which are then applied in the field. Students should be prepared to spend multiple hours outside, under varying weather conditions, and sometimes covering several miles of easy-moderate hiking.

ENGL 364: Literature and Landscape
Professor: Dr. Atreyee Phukan
Core Curriculum Information: Literary Inquiry and Global Diversity level 2

Course description coming soon! 


South Africa - Johannesburg/Makuleke Village

POLS 343/SOCI 375: Education, Citizenship, and Politics in South Africa
Professor: Dr. Mike Williams & Dr. Lisa Nunn
Core Curriculum Information: Advanced Integration and Global Diversity level 2

This study abroad opportunity offers students a unique opportunity to visit South Africa for a community engagement experience and to learn about its history, politics, educational system and culture. This course will examine the origins of segregation and apartheid in the history of South Africa and assess the prospects for a successful political and economic transformation in the post-apartheid era. As a country that is just over two decades removed from apartheid rule, the study of South African politics, education and history will enable students to think critically about the legacy of authoritarian rule, democratization, and race and ethnic reconciliation, specifically in comparison to the U.S..


U.S. - Hawaii

ENGR 110: The Design of Coffee
Professor: Dr. Truc Ngo
Core Curriculum Information: Science and Technological Inquiry

In this course, students learn about the production of green coffee beans from farming stage to milling and shipping. Students will also learn the influences of the coffee industry on local farming communities, culture and economy. This class will be held on USD campus and in Hawaii. Students will be taken to visit a local coffee farm to learn about coffee plant growing practices, cherry picking/harvesting and drying process. Students will also be visiting a coffee mill to learn about the process of green bean preparations before shipping to distributors.  During these visits, students will learn about the impacts of the coffee industry on local communities, economy and culture. Also, the impact of climate change on coffee growing and harvesting will also be observed and discussed.


The University of San Diego offers several short-term programs during the intersession term. These programs are offered in various international locations and are all taught by USD faculty members. Program locations and courses change periodically.

The tuition cost for these programs is subsidized by the university and USD International Center scholarships as well as outside scholarships are available.

The program cost ranges from $4,670-$5,270 and includes the following: three to four units of USD tuition, housing, excursions, class related visits, medical insurance, and some group meals. Some additional fees may apply based on the course. For complete information on the program details, please click on the program link to be directed to the program-specific brochure page.

Intersession 2020

Deadline for Asia Tour program: September 18, 2019
Deadline for all other programs: September 25, 2019

For more information on the program, click on the location listed under the "Program" heading. For course descriptions, please click on the course.

Program Course(s) Offered Professor Cost

Argentina- Buenos Aires
Business and Liberal Arts Program

 

ECON/BUSN 339: Latin American Business Environment

THRS 369: Liberation Theology

Dr. Eileen Daspro 

Dr. Karen Teel

 $4850

Argentina- Buenos Aires
Spanish Program

 

SPAN 201: Third Semester Spanish Dr. Alejandro Meter  $5150

Asia Tour

 

POLS 494/594/ or CHIN 494: The Asia Tour Dr. Randy Willoughby and Dr. Mei Yang  $5850

 Australia - Sydney

PSYC 355: Abnormal Psychology

Dr. Michael Ichiyama

 $5450

England - London

 

  
ISYE 410: Human Factors Engineering Dr. Bradley Chase

  $5150

  $5350 (for ENGL course)    

ENGL 240/420: Shakespeare in London Dr. Maura Giles-Watson
MKTG 305: Global Marketing Dr. Maria Kniazeva

Jamaica - Duncans

ARTV 101: Fundamentals of Drawing - Visualizing Jamaica

COMM 203: Public Speaking

Dr. John Halaka

Dr. Diane Keeling

 $5050

 $5250 (for ARTV course)

 

Japan - Tokyo 

ECON/BUSN 494: Business Environment of Asia

BUSN 377: Negotiation in a Global Business Environment 

THRS 394: Religions of Asia 

Dr. Alan Gin

Professors Craig and Linda Barkacs

Professor Lark Diaz 

$5500 

Sundance Film Festival - Park City, Utah

 

COMM 433: American Independent Cinema 

 

Dr. Roger Pace

Dr. Eric Pierson

 $4850

Intersession 2020 Course Descriptions

Argentina - Buenos Aires (Business & Liberal Arts Program)

ECON/BUSN 339: Latin American Business Environment in Buenos Aires 
Professors: Dr. Eileen Daspro
Core Curriculum Information: N/A
Major/Minor/Concentration:An elective for International Business, Business Administration and Economics majors and minors; an elective Business Economics majors


This course is designed to prepare participants to work effectively in or with Latin America organizations by providing an understanding of the issues, opportunities, and complexities associated with doing business in the region. The focus is on the cultural, historical, economic, social, political and business environments in Latin America and on the activities of companies operating in Latin America, both foreign and domestic. Successful Latin American companies competing internationally will also be an aspect of the course. Upon successful completion of the course, students will possess an awareness of the business and economic environments in Latin America, and be able to demonstrate analytical and strategic thinking skills that reflect an understanding of the competitive environment in which local and foreign companies operate in Latin America. 

THRS 369: Liberation Theology
Professors: Dr. Karen Teel
Core Curriculum Information: Theology and Religious Inquiry (FTRI)

Catholic liberation theology began in Latin America. Moreover, Pope Francis, known to be friendly to liberation theology, is Argentinian—the first Latin American pope. Buenos Aires is an ideal site for students to learn about this branch of theology. This course will include a study of the origin, characteristics, method, central themes, and current expressions of liberation theology. Special emphasis on the understanding of revelation, God, Jesus Christ, the Church, the human being, Christian ethics, social justice, and Christian spirituality as well as attention to Latin American liberation theology and history.

 

Argentina - Buenos Aires (Spanish Program)

SPAN 201: Third Semester Spanish
Professor: Dr. Alejandro Meter
Core Curriculum Information: Second Language Competency (CSLA)

Thsi course is a three-week intensive language course that emphasizes Spanish language learning through a full immersion experience as students are housed with local host families. This course completes the introduction of the basic structures of the language, with continuing emphasis on communicative proficiency. At this level students are encouraged to participate in cultural activities within the Spanish speaking community which will surround them while in Buenos Aires.


Asia Tour

POLS 494/594: The Asia Tour
Professor: Dr. Randy Willoughby and Dr. Mei Yang
Core Curriculum Information: N/A
Major/Minor/Concentration: Political Science, International Relations, International Business

This course blends politics, culture, and security in several very different Asian destinations: South Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Cambodia. In each location we spend four to six days and have a mix of cultural site visits (e.g. the Angkor Temple complex outside Siem Reap, the National Palace Museum in Taipei,) meetings with area experts at local universities (e.g. Pannasastra University of Cambodia,) diplomatic sessions (US embassy in Seoul, US consulate, and Taiwan Institute in Taipei,) special excursions (the DMZ in Korea, the art district of Taipei, etc.) a service opportunity (teaching English to Cambodian elementary school students,) and of course lectures and discussions with the two instructors. 

 

Australia - Sydney

 

PSYC 355: Abnormal Psychology
Professor: Dr. Michael Ichiyama
Core Curriculum Information: N/A
Major/Minor/Concentration: Requirement for Psychology, Behavioral Neuroscience and an elective for Psychology and Biomedial Ethics minors.

This course reviews the current literature on the etiology, prevalence, classification, and treatment considerations relating to abnormal behavior and mental disorders. Course assumes an integrated biopsychosocial perspective and focuses on adult psychopathology. Gender effects and cultural considerations as they relate to the study of abnormal behavior and adult mental disorders are examined.

 


England - London

ISYE 410: Human Factors Engineering
Professor: Dr. Bradley Chase
Core Curriculum Information: N/A
Major/Minor/Concentration: Elective for Industrial and Systems Engineering major, take as an Engineering elective or possible elective in other majors

This course has a broad appeal and can draw interest from all of engineering, as well as psychology and other social sciences. Topics such as Industrial Ergonomics and even Cognitive Ergonomics allow for drawing from experts outside the US and outside the context of the US-based Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Tours and the incorporation of local guest speakers can enhance the students learning and provide some global context. Human Factors engineering is the discipline that takes into account human strength and limitations in the design of interactive systems that involve people, tools, technology, and work environments, to ensure safety, effectiveness, and ease of use. A human factors engineer examines a particular activity, product, or task in terms of its component tasks, and then assesses the physical demands, skill demands, mental workload, team dynamics, aspects of the work environment (e.g. adequate lighting, limited noise, or other distractions), to interact with technology or complete a task in a safe and efficient manner).

ENGL 240/420: Shakespeare in London
Professor: Dr. Maura Giles-Watson
Core Curriculum Information: ENGL 240 - ELTI (Literary Inquiry) 
Major/Minor/Concentration: English

Shakespeare’s theatre was a living, money-making scheme, shaped by the city, by history and politics, and by the actors and patrons who entered the gates of the playhouse. This course will teach Shakespeare as one of history’s great artists – whose greatness was forged within the contingencies of the real world. Travel to London to see the place that Shakespeare knew, and to study his plays through live performance. London is a capital of the theatre world, and we will have the opportunity to see several plays. Mornings will be devoted to class, where we will work on the texts. When not in class, we will explore historical sites and museums, and go to the theatre. And there will be ample time for students to get to know contemporary London on their own. This can be taken either as a lower-division course, to fulfill the Literary Inquiry requirement in the Core, or as an upper-division course, fulfilling English major and minor requirements.

MKTG 305: Global Marketing
Professor: Dr. Maria Kniazeva
Core Curriculum Information: Advanced Writing (CADW)
Major/Minor/Concentration: Marketing major, International Business major 

The purpose of this course is to provide an up-to-date overview of global marketing. The principles of marketing will be augmented by additional exposure to the opportunities and problems facing marketing managers in the changing global marketplace. Special attention will be given to the management of cultural differences in product development, distribution systems, pricing, and marketing communication. For International Business minors only, BUSN 361 may substitute MKTG 300 as the prerequisite for this course.

 


Jamaica - Duncans

ARTV 101: Fundamentals of Drawing - Visualizing Jamaica
Professor: Dr. John Halaka
Core Curriculum Information: EARI (Artistic Inquiry)

Drawing is a visual language that offers a wide range of possibilities as a tool for visualizing the world, self-expression and communication. The course will introduce the students to the fundamental elements of drawing by exploring a variety of drawing media, methods and techniques.  The projects, readings and assignments will enable the students to develop strong drawing skills and perceptual capabilities, while engaging in the natural, cultural and historical landscapes of Jamaica. 

COMM 203: Public Speaking
Professor: Dr. Diane Keeling
Core Curriculum Information: CORL (Oral Community competency)

Jamaica will be the subject of all speaking assignments, each based on the exploration and study of the history, art, culture, and political life of Jamaica. This class aims to inspire and enhance student’s cultural knowledge and civic engagement by engaging Jamaica’s history in oratory and storytelling. We will visit a variety of places across Jamaica that will serve as subjects for student speeches, as well as study the political work and oratory of National Heroes of Jamaica, including Norman Washington Manley, Marcus Mosiah Garvey Jr., Paul Bogle, and George William Gordon. Jamaican folklore and local stories will assist student’s understanding of storytelling and students will interview local residents around their selected speech topics to be used as supporting material. Students will study tour guides and learn how history can come alive through different walking tours, including sugar plantation tours and culinary tours. Students will emerge from this class as a practiced orator with an acute understanding of how rhetoric, with its foundation in public speaking, is infused into the people and places of Jamaica. 


Japan - Tokyo

ECON/BUSN 494: Business Environment of Asia
Professor: Dr. Alan Gin
Core Curriculum Information: N/A
Major/Minor/Concentration: Business Administration, International Business, Economics, Business Economics

This course is designed to prepare international managers to work effectively in an Asian business environment through providing an understanding of the issues, opportunities, and complexities associated with doing business in the region. The focus is on the cultural, historical, economic, social, political and business environments in Asia and on the activities of companies operating in Asia, both foreign and domestic. Successful Asian companies competing internationally will also be an aspect of the course. The course will incorporate guest speakers and company visits. 

BUSN 377: Negotiation in a Global Business Environment 
Professor: Professor Linda Barkacs and Professor Craig Barkacs
Core Curriculum Information: N/A
Major/Minor/Concentration: Elective for some School of Business majors 

In an increasingly interdependent world, the ability to negotiate with people with diverse socio-cultural backgrounds and in different regions of the world is crucial for managers and leaders. This course offers skills and knowledge for becoming an effective negotiator through lecture, class discussion, and experimental exercises. This course includes several negotiation simulations and exercises that incorporate cross-cultural and international components.

THRS 394: Religions of Asia
Professor: Professor Lark Diaz
Core Curriculum Information: FTRI (Theological & Religious Inquiry)
Major/Minor/Concentration: Theology & Religious Studies, counts as elective in Asian Studies minor or International Business major

An introduction to East Asian religions with specific emphasis placed on the indigenous Chinese religions of Confucianism and Daoism (Taoism), the ethnic Japanese religion of Shinto, as well as on Chinese and Japanese forms of Buddhism. This course explores not only Confucianism, Daoism, Shinto, and Buddhism as Japanese cultural traditions, but also the transformation of those traditions in contemporary Japan.


U.S. - Park City: Sundance Film Festival 

COMM 433: American Independent Cinema
Professors: Dr. Roger Pace & Dr. Eric Pierson
Core Curriculum Information: N/A
Major/Minor/Concentration: Communication Studies

This course, offered at the Sundance Film Festival, is an intense examination of the independent film industry during the Festival.  Students will engage the films and filmmakers firsthand through a series of lectures, screenings, panels, and small group discussions.  Classes are conducted in a conference room in the hotel.  There are a series of brief mandatory meetings in the Fall prior to departure.  Prerequisite: A strong interest in film.

University of San Diego students have an opportunity to immerse themselves in local communities while abroad and gain valuable experience through service learning and community building activities. Some of our study abroad programs include service learning and community building as a key component of the program; in other programs, service opportunities are optional but available.

Please see below for more information about ways to engage at a deeper level within the community while you are abroad.

Service Learning and Community Building Programs Abroad (short-term programs)

 

Jamaica

USD sends students to Jamaica approximately two times per year in an effort to maintain what has become a remarkable connection between the USD campus community and the locals who live in Duncans, Jamaica on the island's northern coast. In addition to earning course credit while abroad, students have the opportunity to engage in service within the community at local schools, learning centers and in rural neighborhoods. The community of Duncans holds a special place in the heart of many USD students, staff and faculty. Click here to learn more about the Jamaica program.


South Africa

Join USD for this study abroad opportunity that offers students a unique opportunity to visit South Africa and to learn more about its history, politics, and culture. As a country that has emerged from apartheid rule, the study of South African politics and history will enable students to think critically about the legacy of authoritarian rule, democratization, and race and ethnic reconciliation. The academic component will be supplemented with opportunities to engage with South African communities, such as black townships and the rural village of Makuleke. These experiences will introduce students to different cultural traditions and practices that they can share with friends and family. Click here to see the USD South Africa program in action.

Semester Abroad Programs with Opportunities for Service and Community Building

Information coming soon.