Stopping Traffick: How Can USD Lead the Effort to End Human Trafficking?

This event occurred in the past

Stopping Traffick: How Can USD Lead the Effort to End Human Trafficking?

This event occurred in the past

Date and Time

  • Wednesday, January 29, 2020 from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
  • Thursday, January 30, 2020 from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Location

Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice, ABCD

5998 Alcala Park San Diego, CA 92110

Cost

0

Details

If you are committed to ending human trafficking by developing a strategy to address the issue on a local, national and global level, you are invited to participate in U.S.D.’s Stopping Traffick event, which will take place on Wednesday, January 29 and Thursday, January 30, 2020.  This innovative, collaborative event is a two-day solutions summit jointly hosted by USD School of Law and the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies focused on developing a campus-wide initiative to address human trafficking locally, nationally, and globally.

Participants will take part in design thinking activities to construct U.S.D.’s role in creating long-term change and impact to stop human trafficking.

Conference organizers are looking for faculty, students, graduate students and alumni of USD who are committed to developing a deeper understanding of the issues surrounding human trafficking. Undergraduate and Graduate students this is an excellent opportunity for you to take a deep-dive to better understand this critical issue. Your knowledge and perspective are invaluable to our campus community and will be a welcome asset to our collaborative efforts at Stopping Traffick.  I invite you to register for the event here   and ensure your “seat at the table” and to enable event organizers to plan accordingly.

If you would like to talk more about this event or have questions, please contact Jessica Heldman.

The event is free to attend, and registration is encouraged.

  • Partners

    school of peaceschool of law

    free to thrive

  • More Information

    Stopping Traffick: USD takes on human Trafficking

    As USD School of Law prepares to embrace a new decade as the leading law school in San Diego, Dean Stephen C. Ferruolo maintains a bold strategic vision for its future. With more and more students entering law school with a clear interest in public policy/interest and community service, the law school is determined to expand the social conscience of the university’s campus community, and create not only remarkable students and professionals, but also a community that could take on some of humanity’s most urgent challenges. Envisioning 2024—the university’s strategic plan—lays out an inclusive vision statement: “The University of San Diego sets the standard for an engaged, contemporary Catholic university where innovative changemakers confront humanity’s urgent challenges.” The statement is ambitious—and it’s more than empty words. It is a challenge to the USD community to make good on the promise. And the challenge has been accepted.

    January 2020, a committed group of academic and community leaders —led by the work of the Kroc School of Peace, the School of Law, and outside organizations including Free to Thrive and Project Concern International—will come together to discuss what can be done to address one of the most pressing social and cultural issues of our time: Human Trafficking. The event, “Stopping Traffick,” is intended to be a collaborative meeting of the minds of representatives from different schools within the USD campus, along with outside organizations, experts, community members and, most importantly, those who have experienced human trafficking themselves. Spearheaded by Dean Stephen Ferruolo of the School of Law and Dean Patricia Marquez of the School of Peace Studies, the event is the first of its kind for the university, and for the San Diego community at large.

    The scale and scope of the problem of human trafficking is not always a hot button issue in the media, but the reality is that this form of inhuman abuse is flourishing within San Diego’s borders. Human trafficking is a worthy issue to take up—and one that various USD faculty and alumni have been involved with for years.

    A Bombshell Report

    $800 million per year. That’s how much the underground sex economy generates in San Diego each year, according to an eye-opening study by the Kroc School’s Ami Carpenter. Carpenter, along with Dr. Jamie Gates of Point Loma Nazarene University, designed and executed a wide-reaching study that now serves as the backbone for addressing the problem of human trafficking within the San Diego community and beyond. “It was a game changer,” said Jamie Beck, USD Law alumnus and president of Free to Thrive, of the study. “It put concrete data to what we knew only anecdotally.” The report detailed some surprising facts—including that 80 percent of the human trafficking victims in our area are Americans, not foreign born, which many assume.

    “This is THE human rights issue of our time,” said Carpenter, who will play a significant role in January’s event. Carpenter’s study has helped raise awareness, raise funding and even change policies, but much more needs to be done. “We need more beds and medical care for survivors of sex trafficking,” says Carpenter. “We spend plenty on arresting traffickers and johns, but not enough on rehabilitation for survivors.” Carpenter also believes that demand reduction—achieved through education and enforcement—can make a big difference. These issues, and many others, will be on the table for strategic “design-thinking” discussion during the two-day Stopping Traffick event, where Carpenter will represent the Kroc School of Peace. “We don’t want to be overly prescriptive,” she said. “We just want to figure out what we can do, and how we can make a difference.”

    An Intentional Collaboration

    Stopping Traffick is a novel approach to the issue, according to Bridget Gramme ’98 (BA), ’03 (JD), Director of the Center for Public Interest Law at USD. “How do we serve our community and the greater border region by using our expertise to engage and partner with the community to solve serious problems? That’s what we’re trying to accomplish,” said Gramme. It was important for Gramme and others involved that the event not take on the typical “academic” approach where an agenda is decided by a small group of administrators and the “solutions” were purely academic, without input from those with lived experience. “It’s a more connected approach with the community, versus an ‘ivory tower’ approach. It’s an intentional collaboration,” said Gramme.

    Collaboration matters—and it’s not just between the campus and community. Inter-school and inter-departmental collaboration are equally important to the effort. Despite the fact that many groups across campus have been working on the issue of human trafficking for years, their efforts rarely cross paths. “Too often, we operate in silos,” said Gramme. “We want to bring together all of the disciplines and all of the people on campus that are working on this issue.”

    Without a prescribed outcome, and without expert-led lectures, Stopping Traffick will be an entirely new experience for most of its participants, including professor Jessica Heldman, ’04 (JD), Fellmeth-Peterson Professor in Residence in Child Rights, “We’re gathering to share with each other what we’re working on and what we know,” said Heldman. “The goal is to find out what we can do together as an institution to make a difference. It’s really about starting the conversation.”

    Exactly how to start that conversation, though, was the trick to getting Stopping Traffick off the ground. The organizers knew that participants outside of the organization were critical to the event’s design and success.

    Lived Experience

    Jamie Beck, ’11 (JD) founder of Free to Thrive—a non-profit that provides legal support to victims of human trafficking—has been working on the issue for most of her professional life. As a young attorney for Procopio, Cory, Hargreaves & Savitch, Beck often took on human trafficking victims as clients on a pro-bono basis. She quickly realized that there was a stunning lack of resources available to these victims and set off to found Free to Thrive to help change that calculus. Through her work with survivors, Beck has gained significant knowledge on the subject, and as one of the working group members of Stopping Traffick, she has been instrumental in bringing those with “lived experience” into the fold. Beck is working with three different people who have been involved in trafficking—a victim, a john and a trafficker—to hear their opinions and to help her and colleagues design a discussion model that will be the driving force behind the event. “We want to look at how we, as a community, can address sex trafficking by building empathy for the exploiter and the victim,” said Beck. “Part of our goal is to break down the bias and stereotypes. A lot of what people think about human trafficking is much different in reality,” she said. “It’s a holistic way to tackle this. And it’s the only way to end it.”

    The model that Beck and her colleagues have been working on, and which they will bring to Stopping Traffick, is based on Design Thinking—an iterative process that seeks to understand the user, challenge assumptions, and redefine problems in an attempt to identify alternative strategies and solutions that might not be instantly apparent. Beck believes this model will serve as an effective vehicle through which to generate real solutions to this very real problem. “I believe this model will really show us how to design solutions—it’s not just academics telling us what they think, it’s people who have been there and experienced it,” she said.

    In addition to Beck and Free to Thrive, members of Project Concern International—which seeks to enhance the lives of women and girls and also focuses on human trafficking—are part of the Stopping Traffick working group. The inclusion of as many outside groups and individuals who can help in this effort will be paramount to its success, not only for the initial event in January, but going forward from here. The university, though, will be responsible for driving the action, and hopefully spearheading solutions to the issue. “I think it’s important for the university to be a leader and a driver on this issue, while also being a listener to the victims of this so we can move forward with greater momentum,” said Bridget Gramme. “The resources we have—research, students, engaged people—can make a real difference in this effort. What we’re doing is trying to harness it and help the people who are doing this work on the ground every day.”

  • Agenda

    Wednesday, January 29, 2020 (subject to change)

    • 8:00 am - Registration & Continental Breakfast
    • 9:00 am - Summit Begins
    • 10:45 am - Break
    • 12:15 pm - Lunch (boxed lunch)
    • 1:30 pm - Afternoon Session
    • 3:00 pm - Break
    • 5:00 pm - Reflection & Wellbeing

    Thursday, January 30, 2020 (subject to change)

    • 8:00 am - Registration & Continental Breakfast
    • 9:00 am - Summit Begins
    • 10:45 am - Break
    • Noon - Lunch (boxed lunch)*
    • 1:30 pm - Afternoon Session
    • 3:00 pm - Break
    • 5:00 pm - Reception

    *Thursday lunch overlaps with the optional USD All-Faith Service. All attendees are welcome to attend. A group will depart the conference at Noon and walk to Shiley Theater on campus. The group will be back in time to eat lunch and attend the afternoon session.