Academic Course Catalogs

Drop Shadow

English

Mary Hotz, RSCJ, PhD, CHAIR
Jericho Brown, PhD
Cynthia Caywood, PhD
Dennis M. Clausen, PhD
Halina Duraj, PhD
Carlton D. Floyd, PhD
Maura Giles-Watson, PhD
Joseph Jonghyun Jeon, PhD
Joseph McGowan, PhD
Gail Perez, PhD
Atreyee Phukan, PhD
Fred Miller Robinson, PhD
Abraham Stoll, PhD
Barton Thurber, PhD
Stefan Vander Elst, PhD
Irene Williams, PhD

The English Major

The English major affords students a rich educational experience in the history, theory, and appreciation of literature and in the craft of writing. Courses encourage students to develop skills in textual analysis and critical thinking, as well as expertise in understanding the vital role of artistic expression in society and culture.

In lower-division courses, students improve essential skills needed to understand and interpret literature and to express their ideas in writing. Emphasizing poetry as well as prose, these courses invite students to read literature within a variety of social, cultural, and ethnic contexts.

Upper-Division Courses encourage a sense of literary history and tradition as well as an understanding of adaptation and change in cultural and literary conventions, from the early medieval origins of English to the present diversity of expression by users of this global language. With the freedom afforded by Upper-Division Electives, the student is invited, for example, to explore U.S. ethnic and world literatures, to undertake the study of non-canonical works, to examine different genres and historical periods, or to nurture a specific interest through a series of related classes. The Senior Project option provides a further opportunity for in-depth study in the student’s chosen area.

As one of the core disciplines of university education, the English major values both the pleasures we derive from literature and the challenges it brings to the ways we think about our cultural, political, and personal lives. This grounding in written expression, literary analysis, and cultural criticism provides excellent preparation for careers in fields such as law, business, government, education, or communications, as well as for graduate study in literature or writing.

Major Requirements (39 units)

Students majoring in English must satisfy the core curriculum requirements as set forth in this course catalog and complete all major requirements as presented in the following schedule:

Lower Division (12 units)
ENGL 222 Poetry (3)
ENGL 280 Introduction to Shakespeare (3)

Two lower-division elective courses (six units) chosen from:
ENGL 223 Studies in Genre (3)
ENGL 224 Studies in Literary Traditions (3)
ENGL 225 Studies in U.S. Literature (3)
ENGL 228 Studies in World Literature (3)

Upper Division (27 units)
ENGL 300 British Literature to 1800 (3)

24 Upper-Division Units that must include the following distribution requirements:
Literature before 1660 (3)
Literature from 1660 to 1900 (3)
Literature from 1900 to the present (3)
An English “W” course (3).

The English Minor

Minor Requirements (18 units)

Lower Division (9 units)
ENGL 222 Poetry (3)
ENGL 280 Introduction to Shakespeare (3)

One lower-division elective course (three units) chosen from:
ENGL 223 Studies in Genre (3)
ENGL 224 Studies in Literary Traditions (3)
ENGL 225 Studies in U.S. Literature (3)
ENGL 228 Studies in World Literature (3)

Upper Division (9 units)
ENGL 300 British Literature to 1800 (3)
Two upper division elective courses (6 units)

The Emphasis in Creative Writing

The creative writing emphasis in poetry or fiction builds upon the foundation established in ENGL 375, Introduction to Creative Writing, and prepares students for courses in the genre they choose to explore. More specifically, the creative writing courses help students realize the daily discipline, diligence, and concentrated attention required of the serious fiction writer and poet. They promote writing as an art, craft, and ultimately a vocation—one not to be entered into lightly. All students who continue from the introductory to intermediate and advanced levels also become more discerning readers.

Emphasis Requirements (12 units)

ENGL 375 Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
ENGL 381 Intermediate Poetry Writing (3) OR
ENGL 382 Intermediate Fiction Writing (3)
ENGL 391 Advanced Poetry Writing (3) OR
ENGL 392 Advanced Fiction Writing (3)
One “crossover” course in a genre other than the student’s specified genre, from the following choices*:
ENGL 376 Topics in Creative Writing: Screenwriting (enrollment by consent of instructor) (3)
ENGL 381 Intermediate Poetry Writing (3)
ENGL 382 Intermediate Fiction Writing (3)
ENGL 494 Writing Autobiography (3)
ENGL 494/ Playwriting (3)
THEA 365W
*Other upper division creative writing courses students wish to substitute for their “crossover” course must be approved by the program director and English department chair.

English Courses (ENGL)

Students should consult the list provided by the English department each semester during the class reservation period for more details concerning the focus and materials of particular course offerings.

ENGL 100 INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE WRITING (3)
A writing workshop to prepare students to take ENGL 121. Instruction in the fundamentals of various modes of written expression, including sentence work, understanding the importance of audience, editing, and revision. Readings selected from non-fictional prose works. Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed by trained peer-tutors. Every semester.

ENGL 121 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE (3)
Fulfills the core curriculum requirement in lower-division written literacy, and should be taken within the first four semesters. Practice in developing skills of close observation, investigation, critical analysis, and informed judgment in response to literary texts. Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed by trained peer-tutors. Every semester.

ENGL 122 COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE FOR EDUCATORS (3)
Fulfills the core curriculum requirement in lower-division written literacy for students planning to complete the liberal studies major. Practice in developing skills of close observation, investigation, critical analysis, and informed judgment in response to literary texts. Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed by trained peer-tutors. Every semester.

ENGL 222 POETRY (3)
An introduction to the study of poetry. Readings include a variety of poetic forms and range across literary periods and nationalities. Every semester.

ENGL 223 STUDIES IN GENRE (3)
Readings in a type of literature, ranging through periods and nationalities. May include drama, narrative, epic, tragedy, comedy, biography, autobiography, or others. Every semester.

ENGL 224 STUDIES IN LITERARY TRADITIONS (3)
Readings in a particular body of literature, which may be defined formally, topically, ethnically, or otherwise, as it develops over a period of time. Every semester.

ENGL 225 STUDIES IN U.S. LITERATURE (3)
Readings in some period or aspect of the literature of the United States. Every semester.

ENGL 228 STUDIES IN WORLD LITERATURE (3)
Readings in some period or aspect of literature outside England and the United States. Works not originally in English will be read in translation. Every semester.

ENGL 231 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE (3)
Literary and popular texts produced for children. Emphasis on analysis of how children’s texts construct gender, sex, race, class, family structure, power relations, and violence, for example. Includes phonemic awareness, word analysis, and field experience. Reserved for students in credential programs.

ENGL 280 INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE (3)
Studies in the plays and poems of William Shakespeare, including the major genres (tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances). Every semester.

ENGL 298 INTERNSHIP (1-3)
Practical experience tutoring students in low-income schools, grades K-8. Open to all USD students, regardless of major. Offered for one to three units of upper- or lower-division credit. Every semester.

ENGL 300 BRITISH LITERATURE TO 1800 (3)
This course presents a survey of English literature from the seventh century (Caedmon) to 1800, including texts representative of the Old English and Medieval periods, the Renaissance, and the 18th century. Topics will include the evolution of the language and the development of literary/poetic form as well as historical and cultural contexts. Texts and writers usually include Beowulf, Chaucer, the Pearl Poet, Langland, Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Pope, Swift, and others. Every semester.

ENGL 304W ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3)
A workshop course in the writing of expository, descriptive, and critical prose. This course is designed to fulfill the upper division written literacy requirement for non-English majors; it will fulfill an upper division elective for English majors. Every semester.

ENGL 306W ADVANCED COMPOSITION FOR EDUCATORS (3)
For liberal studies majors only. A workshop course in the writing of reflective, academic, and professional prose. Reading, writing, and research across the curriculum of the public elementary school classroom. Includes completion of the Content Portfolio for the liberal studies major. Every semester.

ENGL 310 DANTE (3)
Dante’s Divine Comedy, Vita Nuova, and selected other works in their literary and historical contexts. Texts will be read in English translation.

ENGL 312 STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE (3)
This course considers literary texts composed from late antiquity through to the 15th century that may be drawn from European and other traditions of the period (Persian, Arabic, Indian, Slavic, Chinese, others). The course may include such topics as: the Heroic age; the Arthurian cycle; the age of chivalry; the Crusades. Texts are generally read in translation.

ENGL 314 CHAUCER (3)
The life and work of Geoffrey Chaucer, set in the historical and cultural context of late 14th-century England. The course gives particular attention to The Canterbury Tales, as well as to some of Chaucer’s shorter poems. Readings will be in Middle English.

ENGL 318 DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3)
Studies in the phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics of the English language; synchronic and diachronic variation; current theories of the grammar of English; theories of language acquisition and contact. Required of teacher credential candidates.

ENGL 324 RENAISSANCE DRAMA (3)
Studies in the English drama of the 16th and 17th centuries, focusing on such contemporaries of Shakespeare as Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and others.

ENGL 326 RENAISSANCE STUDIES (3)
Studies in the literature and culture of early-modern England. Readings may include poetry, drama, and prose, fiction and non-fiction.

ENGL 328 MILTON (3)
Studies in the poetry and prose of John Milton, with emphasis on Paradise Lost.

ENGL 332 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY STUDIES (3)
Studies in the prose and poetry of men and women writing between 1660 and 1800. Writers may include Behn, Burney, Dryden, Finch, Johnson, Montagu, Pope, and Swift. Readings are grounded in the social, intellectual, and cultural history of the period.

ENGL 334 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY DRAMA (3)
Studies in the drama written between 1660 and 1800. Playwrights may include Behn, Centlivre, Congreve, Etheredge, Farquhar, Sheridan, and Wycherly. Readings are grounded in the social, intellectual, and cultural history of the period.

ENGL 336 DEVELOPMENT OF THE NOVEL (3)
This course studies the emergence and development of the novel in England as a distinct literary genre in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Authors may include Defoe, Richardson, Swift, Fielding, Sterne, Smollett, Lewis, and Austen.

ENGL 342 ROMANTICISM (3)
Poetry and prose of first- and second-generation Romantic writers. May include Blake, the Wordsworths, Coleridge, Byron, the Shelleys, and Keats, as well as Continental and American Romantic writers.

ENGL 344 VICTORIAN STUDIES (3)
Poetry and prose of the Victorian period. May include works by Carlyle, Tennyson, the Brownings, the Pre-Raphaelites, Arnold, Wilde, Ruskin, Newman, Mill, and letters, journals, and diaries of the period.

ENGL 348 NINETEENTH-CENTURY NOVEL (3)
Readings in Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, George Eliot, Hardy, Conrad, and others. May also include letters, essays, and verse of the period.

ENGL 352 U.S. LITERATURE TO 1900 (3)
Readings will include works by Bradstreet, Hawthorne, Cooper, Poe, Twain, Dickinson, James, Whitman, Melville, and others.

ENGL 355 EARLY U. S. NONFICTION (3)
Essays, autobiographies, journals, manifestos, travel writings, and reviews. May include works by Edwards, Franklin, Poe, Fuller, Douglass, Emerson, Peabody, Thoreau, Whitman, or others.

ENGL 356 U.S. LITERATURE FROM 1900 TO 1940 (3)
Readings will include works by Crane, Robinson, Dreiser, Wharton, James, Cather, Frost, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and others.

ENGL 357 MODERN U.S. NONFICTION (3)
Essays, autobiographies, and miscellaneous U.S. prose since 1850. May include works by James, Adams, Gilman, DuBois, Stein, Wright, W.C. Williams, Baldwin, Lorde, Rich, or others.

ENGL 358 U.S. ETHNIC LITERATURE (3)
Studies in African-American, Asian-American/Pacific Islander, Chicano/Latino, and Native-American literatures. May be taught from a comparatist perspective and include other U.S. ethnic groups. Historical, political, and cultural material may be provided as context.

ENGL 359 MODERN U.S. FICTION (3)
Major works in relation to issues in 20th-century U.S. literature and culture. May include novels or short stories by Wharton, Stein, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Wright, Morrison, or others.

ENGL 360 MODERN POETRY (3)
A selection of poets from early modernists to the present. May include works by Yeats, Stein, Eliot, Stevens, Hughes, Brooks, Rukeyser, Sexton, Yau, or others.

ENGL 362 MODERN DRAMA (3)
A study of selected plays from the past 125 years. Playwrights may include Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Brecht, O’Neill, Churchill, Mamet, August Wilson, or others.

ENGL 364 POSTCOLONIAL STUDIES (3)
Studies in the literature that has arisen from European empires around the globe and the struggles of colonized peoples. Emphasis on the British Empire and the new nations of South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. May include historical contexts and non-literary works.

ENGL 366 MODERN EUROPEAN LITERATURE (3)
Readings may include works (in translation) by Dostoevsky, Kafka, Colette, Tsvetayeva, Camus, Levi, Duras, Handke, Bernhard, or others.

ENGL 368 MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE (3)
Major works in relation to issues in 20th-century British literature and culture. Writers may include Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, Forster, Woolf, Shaw, Auden, Lessing, or others.

ENGL 370 CONTEMPORARY FICTION (3)
Studies in selected works of recent fiction from around the world.

ENGL 372 FILM STUDIES (3)
Aspects of film as narrative are considered. Topics may include film genres (the silents and early talkies, historical dramas, film noir, cinéma vérité), cinematic adaptation of literary texts, film theory, and the history of film. Restricted to English majors.

ENGL 374 GENDER AND LITERATURE (3)
Studies in the social and cultural construction of gender in literature and literary theory, as well as the impact of gender on the formation of literary canons.

ENGL 375 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (3)
A workshop on imaginative writing, with examples drawn from literature.

ENGL 376 TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING (3)
Workshop discussion and analysis of student poetry, fiction, or drama (including screenwriting). Prerequisite: ENGL 375, or consent of instructor.

ENGL 378 METHODS OF TEACHING WRITING (3)
Workshop in the teaching of expository, descriptive, and critical prose. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the core curriculum requirement in upper division written literacy (any “W” course).

ENGL 380 LITERARY THEORY (3)
Investigation of the values and assumptions that inform literature and literary criticism through readings in important theorists. Recommended for students planning on graduate work.

ENGL 381 Intermediate Poetry Writing (3)
Workshop in poetry writing with examples drawn from literature. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

ENGL 382 Intermediate Fiction Writing (3)
Workshop in fiction writing, especially the short story, with examples drawn from literature. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

ENGL 391 Advanced Poetry Writing (3)
Investigates and hones the craft of poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 381.

ENGL 392 Advanced Fiction Writing (3)
Workshop to discuss recently published short fiction and students’ stories. Prerequisite: ENGL 391.

ENGL 420 ADVANCED STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE (3)
Further study of some aspect of Shakespeare’s work: particular plays, genres, themes, etc. Topic varies. Spring semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 280 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 493 WRITING CENTER TUTORS (1-3)
Theory and practice for Writing Center tutors. Consent of Writing Center director required. Every semester.

ENGL 494 SPECIAL TOPICS (3)
Courses that treat a special topic, genre, or author. See departmental list of course offerings each semester.

ENGL 495 SENIOR PROJECT (3)
A capstone course designed to help seniors produce an original research project. Addresses research methods, critical thinking, and writing process. Recommended for students planning on graduate work.

ENGL 498 INTERNSHIP (1-3)
Practical experience tutoring students in low-income schools, grades K-8. Open to all USD students, regardless of major. Offered every semester for one to three units of upper- or lower-division credit. Other internship opportunities in the workplace or community involving writing or reading may be arranged by students with the consent of a faculty advisor and the department chair.

ENGL 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
Arranged with the consent of a faculty advisor and the department chair. Restricted to upper division English majors or students who have completed at least one upper division literature course.

W Courses Explained

Upper Division Historical Requirement