Academic Course Catalogs

Drop Shadow

Art, Architecture + Art History

Can Bilsel, PhD, CHAIR
John Halaka, MFA
Daniel López-Pérez, MS, MA
Juliana Maxim, PhD
Duncan McCosker, MFA
Saba Oskoui, MFA
Jessica Lee Patterson, PhD
Allison Wiese, MFA
Sally E. Yard, PhD

The Majors

The Department of Art, Architecture + Art History is home to visual arts, architecture, and art history majors. Our students are introduced to a great variety of artistic practices, both traditional and emerging, before concentrating in one of these disciplines. Dedicated to exploring the creative practices at the forefront of our disciplines, we believe that art and architecture not only mirror the society in which they are produced, but also shape it: we are most interested in art’s potential to offer a critique of culture and help envision a better environment for the future.

The Visual Arts Major

A primary objective of the visual arts program is to guide the student, major and non-major alike, to a practical understanding of many of the languages and traditions of visual expression. The program encourages a holistic exploration of the arts, while simultaneously requiring art majors to develop advanced skills in at least one of the following sub-disciplines: Art, Technology and Critical Studies (ATaCS); drawing; new media; painting; photography; sculpture; or visual communications. Visual arts majors who are considering graduate study are encouraged to complete a minor in art history.

Emphasis: Drawing; New Media; Painting; Photography; Sculpture; and Visual Communications

Preparation for the Major

Students are required to complete four of the following: ARTV 101, 103, 105, 108, 160, as well as ARTH 101 and one of the following: ARTH 133, 134, 135, 138, 330. (ARTV 104 can be substituted for ARTV 105; ARCH 121 can be substituted for ARTH 135.)

Visual arts students are strongly encouraged to complete the above six courses by the end of their sophomore year.

The Major

a. Select at least one area of specialization from the sub-disciplines of visual arts.
b. Complete 28 Upper-Division Units of visual arts (ARTV) including ARTV 478 (Senior Thesis Studio Seminar) and ARTV 495 (Senior Thesis). At least nine of the total 28 Upper-Division Units in visual arts need to be in the selected area of specialization.
c. Complete ARTH 334.

Additional Requirements

a. Students must participate in a junior review during the second semester of the junior year.
b. Senior Thesis Studio Seminar must be completed during the first semester of the senior year.
c. ARTV 495 (Senior Thesis) must be completed during the second semester of the senior year.
d. Students must take at least one upper division course in their selected area of specialization during their senior year.
e. Students selecting drawing or painting as an area of specialization must take ARTV 302.

Emphasis: Art, Technology and Critical Studies (ATaCS)

The intention of art, technology and critical studies is to integrate the making of art with the critical study of art. Students are prepared to be artists as both creative public intellectuals and cultural producers. The lower- and Upper-Division Requirements are drawn from both studio art courses and art history courses, with an emphasis on technology and its application to the making of art. Having completed the Lower-Division Requirements outlined above, students with an emphasis in ATaCS should complete the following

Upper-Division Requirements:

The Major (ATaCS)

a. Complete three upper division visual arts courses from: ARTV 308, 320, 369 or 370, 420 or 424
b. Complete two upper division art history courses from: ARTH 338*, 345, 394, 395
c. Complete one of the following: ARTV 308 or ARTV 420
d. Complete four courses from the following list with at least one of those courses coming from the art history area: visual arts courses: ARTV 308, 320, 353, 361, 369, 370, 420, 424, THEA 370; art history courses: ARTH 338, 342, 345, 354, 355, 356, 393, 394, 395, THEA 369
e. Participate in a junior review during the second semester of the junior year
f. Complete ARTV 478 – Senior Thesis Studio Seminar during the first semester of the senior year
g. Complete ARTV 495 – Senior Thesis during the final semester of the senior year
*ARCH 321 can be substituted for ARTH 338.

Courses taken to fulfill requirements (a) and (b) cannot be repeated to fulfill requirement (d).
Please note that under certain circumstances substitution of classes will be allowed with advisor’s approval.

Recommended Elective Courses for Visual Arts Majors

Visual Arts majors and minors are encouraged to consider some of the following courses for fulfillment of core curriculum and elective requirements:

For students selecting a specialization in drawing or painting:
ARTH 333 Modern Art: 1780-1920 (and other upper division art history courses)
ENGL 376 Topics in Creative Writing

For students selecting a specialization in visual communications:
COMM 300 Communication Theory
COMM 475 Intercultural Communication
COMM 435 Principles of Production
PHIL 338 Environmental Ethics
PHIL 274 Twentieth Century Continental Philosophy

For students selecting a specialization in photography:
ARTH 333 Modern Art 1780-1920 (and other upper division art history courses)
ARTH 336 History and Theory of Photography

For students selecting a specialization in sculpture:
ENG 222 Poetry
ARTV 424 Art in the Soundscape

Visual Arts Major Recommended Program of Study

Visual Arts Study Abroad

No more than a total of two ARTV 275 and/or ARTV 375, can be counted toward Visual Arts major credit. ARTV 275 or ARTV 375 can be repeated once for credit. Two sections of ARTV 275 or ARTV 375 can be taken concurrently during a study abroad semester or summer.

The Art History Major

Courses in art history examine art and visual culture in their contexts: probing the intertwining of form, content and meaning; and investigating the theoretical lenses that have been enlisted to discern the import of art, architecture and material culture.

Art History majors choose one of three sub-disciplines:

1. Art History (general)
2. Art Administration
3. History and Theory of Architecture

Preparation for the Major

Students must complete ARTH 101 and one of the following courses: ARTH 133, 134, 135, 136, 138, 140. (ARCH 121 can be substituted for ARTH 135; students considering the History and Theory of Architecture emphasis are encouraged to take ARTH 135 or ARCH 121.) As part of the art history major, students must complete two visual arts courses.

Art History (General)

28 Upper-Division Units in art history. ARTH 395 Methods in Art History and ARTH 495 Senior Thesis are required for graduation.

Art Administration

An art history emphasis is linked with studies in business and administration, in preparation for positions in art-related businesses and institutions. Prerequisites are as in the major.

1. Art components: ARTH 334, 339, 343, 395, 495, 498 and four other upper division art history courses. ARTH 395 Methods in Art History and ARTH 495 Senior Thesis are required for graduation.
2. Management components: Business minor, or six courses including one selected from each of the following fields: ACCT, ENGL, COMM, ITMG, POLS, SOCI.

History and Theory of Architecture

This program encourages students to address contemporary social/cultural circumstances in the light of an historically grounded sense of visual expression and material culture. Courses in the history and theory of art, architecture and the city will be augmented by studies in other fields appropriate to each student’s interests. History and Theory of Architecture is conceived for students who intend to move into fields such as architecture, architectural history and historic preservation or public arts programs, and who will work toward creative strategies of urban intervention. Prerequisites are as in the major. Students must complete 28 Upper-Division Units in art history, including ARTH 395 Methods in Art History and ARTH 495 Senior Thesis. At least six of these courses must be selected from the following:

ARTH 330, 331, 334, 338, 339, 342, 343, 344, 345, 354, 355, 356, 382, 393 (ARCH 321 can be substituted for ARTH 338; ARCH 322 can be substituted for ARTH 342; ARCH 323 can be substituted for ARTH 343).

Art History Study Abroad

No more than a total of two ARTH 275 and/or ARTH 375, can be counted toward Art History major credit. ARTH 275 or ARTH 375 can be repeated once for credit. Two sections of ARTH 275 or ARTH 375 can be taken concurrently during a study abroad semester or summer.

Art History Recommended Program of Study

The Architecture Major

The architecture major is a pre-professional program leading to a BA degree within the four-year curriculum of the College of Arts and Sciences. Its primary goal is to introduce students to architecture as a cultural practice that structures both the physical and social environment. In addition to core courses in architectural history, analysis and design, architecture majors will be introduced to a wide range of disciplines and creative studio practices that contribute to an architect’s breadth of knowledge and problem-solving skills.

The architecture major also prepares students for graduate programs in architecture and the allied fields such as landscape architecture, interior design, urban design, urban planning, historic preservation, art and architectural history. Students interested in moving to careers in civil engineering, real estate, or working for international, public, or non-governmental development agencies are encouraged to enroll in the architecture major in addition to a major or minor in environmental studies, business administration, sociology, ethnic studies or international relations, or a major in engineering.

Preparation for the Major

Lower Division, 17 Units

1. Foundations in Architectural Design (8 units):
ARCH 101 Introduction to Architecture Studio (4)
ARCH 102 Architectural Design Studio I (4)

2. Foundations in the History and Theory of Architecture (6 units):
ARCH 121 Introduction to Modern Architecture (3)
AND
ARTH 136 The Year 1500: A Global History of Art and Architecture (3)
OR
ARTH 101 Introduction to the History of Art (3)

3. One lower-division course in Studio Arts (3 units from):
ARTV 101 Fundamentals of Drawing (3)
ARTV 103 Design Foundations (3)
ARTV 104 Foundations in Form, Space, and Time (3)
ARTV 105 Introduction to Sculpture (3)
ARTV 108 Introduction to New Media in Art (3)
ARTV 160 Photography (3)
THEA 220 Fundamentals of Theatrical Design (3)

Upper-Division Requirements (30 units):

1. Architectural Design (4)
ARCH 301 Architectural Design Studio II (4)

2. History and Theory of Architecture and the City (9 units from):
ARCH 321 City and Utopia (3)
ARCH 322 Contemporary Architecture (3)
ARCH 323 Memory, Monument, Museum (3)
ARCH 330 Special Topics in History of Architecture (3)
ARCH 340 Biography of World Cities (3)

3. Elective from outside the Department of Art (3 units from):
ENVI 312 Introduction to GIS (3)
ENVI 313 Geospatial Information Systems for Organizations
ENVI 314 Introduction to Maps and Spatial Data Analysis (3)
ENVI 315 Geographic Information Systems (3)
ENVI 420 Introduction to Remote Sensing (4)
ENVI 485 Environmental Geology (4)
ETHN 361 Immigration at the U.S.-Mexico Border: Ethnicity, Race and Gender (3)
HIST 334 European Art and Architecture in Context (3)
HIST 390 Art and Architecture in California (3)
POLS 342D Urban Politics (3)
SOCI 363 Urban Sociology (3)
SOCI 400 Urban Planning (3)
SOCI 455 Cities in a Global Context (3)
THEA 305 Technical Theatre with Lab (4)
THEA 320 Scenic Design (3)

4. Upper-Division Electives in Architecture, Visual Arts, Art History (at least 9 units from):
ARCH, ARTV, ARTH 301 or higher

5. Architectural Research and Thesis (5 units):
ARCH 302 Architectural Design Vertical Studio (4)
OR
ARCH 495 Senior Project Studio Seminar (4)
(ARCH 302 may be repeated for credit)
ARCH 496 Senior Thesis in Architecture (1)

Architecture Study Abroad

No more than a total of two ARCH 275 and/or ARCH 375, can be counted toward Architecture major credit. ARCH 275 or ARCH 375 can be repeated once for credit. Two sections of ARCH 275 or ARCH 375 can be taken concurrently during a study abroad semester or summer.

Architecture, Recommended Program of Study

The Minors

The Visual Arts Minor

The minor in visual arts requires four courses selected from the following: ARTV 101, 103, 104, 105, 108, 160; two courses selected from ARTH 101, 133, 134, 135, 136, 138, and 140; and 12 upper division visual arts units (ARCH 121 can be substituted for ARTH 135).

The Art History Minor

The minor in Art History consists of a total of 18 units in art history including two courses selected from ARTH 101,133, 134, 135, 136, 138, and 140; 9 upper division art history units; and one additional upper or lower-division art history or visual arts course (ARCH 121 can be substituted for ARTH 135).

The Architecture Minor

The architecture minor provides students a foundation in the history and theory of architecture and the city in addition to basic design skills.

The minor requires the completion of 6 courses with a total of 20 units as listed below:

Foundations in Studio Art:

Three Lower-Division Units from: ARTV 101, 103, 104 or 105, 108 or 160

Architectural Design:

Four Lower-Division Units from: ARCH 101 or 102
Four Upper-Division Units from: ARCH 301 or 302 (ARCH 302 can be repeated for credit)

History and Theory of Architecture and the City:

Three Lower-Division Units: ARCH 121
Six Upper-Division Units from: ARCH 321, 322, 323, 330 or 340

Architecture Courses (ARCH)

Art History Courses (ARTH)

Visual Arts Courses (ARTV)

Visual Arts Courses (ARTV)

ARTV 101 FUNDAMENTALS OF DRAWING (3)
Introduction to the fundamental elements and principles of drawing. Exploration of a variety of dry and wet media. Primary emphasis on developing the student’s perceptual capabilities and representational skills. Every semester.

ARTV 103 DESIGN FOUNDATIONS (3)
Study of two-dimensional design principles stressing the dynamics of line, shape, value, texture, color, spatial relationships, and composition. This course introduces students to the basics of visual communications. Every semester.

ARTV 104 FOUNDATIONS IN FORM, SPACE, AND TIME (3)
A critical exploration of how we as artists relate to the material world, and how that world in turn influences the work we make. Students will investigate a variety of media and artistic practices through projects, readings, slide presentations, and discussions. The class will examine social, cultural and environmental issues, and their impact on meaning and perception in art. Every semester.

ARTV 105 INTRODUCTION TO SCULPTURE (3)
This studio course is an introductory exploration of the media and methods (traditional and experimental) that form the basis of an ongoing dialogue between object and artist. Students will investigate sculptural form as a means of expression through technical exercises, studio projects, readings, slide lectures and discussions. Every semester.

ARTV 108 INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA IN ART (3)
In this course, students are encouraged to explore the world of independent media by critically engaging in contemporary debates and creatively expressing themselves through various digitally based technologies.

ARTV 160 PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
An introductory lecture and laboratory course that stresses black and white film technique and darkroom procedures. The course encourages the student to investigate photography as a medium of personal expression. Students must have access to a traditional film camera and purchase listed materials for the course as required. Every semester.

ARTV 275 STUDY ABROAD IN VISUAL ARTS (3)
An investigation of site-specific issues or topics in visual arts, offered by a USD affiliated program abroad. Can be repeated once for credit. Two sections of ARTV 275 can be taken concurrently during a study abroad semester or summer.

ARTV 300 VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS (3)
Study of design concepts, form analysis, and development of visual thinking for creative problem solving. Lectures, discussions, and class presentations explore historical, cultural and contemporary issues and practices in visual communications. May be repeated for credit. Fall semester. Prerequisites: ARTV 103, 108. May be taken concurrently with ARTV 108.

ARTV 302 INTERMEDIATE DRAWING (3)
The primary objective of this course is to investigate the intimate relationship between form and content in the creation of images. Drawing projects, lectures, and critiques will stress the organization of the pictorial field and the technical manipulation of the material as means for identifying and articulating the artist’s intentions. Students will be guided through the process of developing visually compelling drawings that are technically and conceptually sophisticated. Required for art majors selecting a specialization in drawing or painting. Spring semester. Prerequisite: ARTV 101.

ARTV 304 INTRODUCTION TO PRINTMAKING/BOOK ARTS (3)
Basic techniques and expressive possibilities of intaglio and relief printmaking and their application to artists’ books. Consideration of word/image relationships, image sequencing and final presentation. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ARTV 101.

ARTV 306 SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE VISUAL ARTS (3)
An in-depth investigation in a studio setting of selected topics in the visual arts. Issues of current and historical interests, methods, and techniques are addressed. May be repeated when topic changes. Two sections may be enrolled in concurrently if topic differs. Consent of instructor or coordinator is required.

ARTV 308 WEB ART (3)
We will be using the Web as a creative medium to examine various issues in telecommunications. Students will learn Web-based production skills. Past projects have included: blogs, mash-ups, Flash animations, interactive Flash instruments, online interventions, the curation of digital collections and the production of experimental narrative websites. Prerequisite: ARTV 108.

ARTV 320 VIDEO STUDIO (3)
For nearly half a century video has played an important role in the studio arts. This course is composed of screenings, lectures, demonstrations, and labs. This course will help students develop production based skills such as shooting/editing video and authoring DVDs. Students will also be encouraged to examine important historical and theoretical issues as they relate to video and performance art today.

ARTV 328 FUNDAMENTALS OF PAINTING (3)
Introduction to the fundamental principles, tools, and techniques necessary for successful expression through the language of painting. The primary emphasis throughout the semester will be on developing the student’s technical proficiency with the medium of painting and enhancing eye/hand coordination. The majority of paintings will be developed from direct observation, with a few projects exploring the artist’s subjective interests. May be repeated for credit when ARTV 429 is not offered. Prerequisite: ARTV 101. Every semester.

ARTV 344 FIGURE DRAWING (3)
A studio course emphasizing the structure and anatomy of the human figure. A variety of drawing techniques and media will be utilized to depict the live model. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ARTV 101.

ARTV 350 ART FUNDAMENTALS (3)
A study of the fundamentals of art as they relate to creative and mental growth. Emphasis is placed on the stages of development from preschool through junior high school. Hands-on experience with appropriate media and techniques, combined with motivational topics that help in establishing the creative atmosphere, which stimulates growth of visual expression. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intended for liberal studies majors or with permission of instructor.

ARTV 353 COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
An introduction to the aesthetic and technical considerations of color photography. The course covers basic camera operation, techniques for exposing and processing strategies for color positive film, and the development of critical issues of color photography. The class includes an introduction to digital imaging, including image scanning and storage strategies, image manipulation, color correction, and digital photographic printing. All prints will be made digitally in the computer lab.

ARTV 354 PHOTO STRATEGIES (3)
In this course photographs are made in an attempt to discover one’s unique voice by building upon the foundation laid by exemplary photographers. The study of artists selected by the student is encouraged through assigned readings, discussions, lectures, and writing assignments. Photographs are made in color and black and white, with both digital and traditional media. Students must have access to a traditional film camera and purchase listed materials for the course as required.

ARTV 361 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
Advanced lecture and laboratory course that continues to develop technical skills and encourage the growth of a personal aesthetic in photography. Advanced topics include the 4 x 5 camera, non-silver printing, color digital printing, and special topics of student interest. Students must have access to a traditional film camera and purchase listed materials for the course as required. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ARTV 160.

ARTV 362 PORTRAITS IN PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
This course engages the student in making portraits in color and black and white photographic media. Students are required to complete a body of work reflecting the concerns of portraiture within a fine arts context. A camera is required. Materials not included. Fall semester.

ARTV 364 INTRODUCTION TO SCULPTURE: FORM, CONTENT, CONTEXT (3)
A preliminary exploration of media and methods that will form the basis of an ongoing dialogue between object and artist. Students will investigate sculptural form as a means of expression through projects, readings, slide presentations, and discussions. Prerequisite: ARTV 104.

ARTV 366 3D CERAMICS STUDIO (3)
A studio course at the intermediate or advanced level focused on the exploration of ceramics as a sculptural medium. Students will be introduced to basic hand building techniques and glaze theory related to sculptural form. Slide lectures, readings, and class discussions will supplement studio work. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ARTV 104.

ARTV 367 3D METALWORKING STUDIO (3)
A studio course at the intermediate level focused on the exploration of metal as a sculptural medium. Students will investigate traditional and contemporary approaches to materials through assignments, readings, projects, and class discussions. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: ARTV 104.

ARTV 368 3D CONCRETE STUDIO (3)
A studio course at the intermediate or advanced level focused on the exploration of concrete as a sculptural medium. Students will investigate traditional and contemporary approaches to this material through assignments, readings, projects and class discussions. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ARTV 104.

ARTV 369 INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED SCULPTURE (3)
A multi-level studio course designed to advance students’ technical and conceptual skills through a series of sculptural problems beyond the introductory level. Studio projects, technical demonstrations, lectures, readings and filed trips create context within the history and practice of contemporary sculpture, expanding students’ knowledge of traditional and experimental approaches to sculpture, while aiding the development (particularly at the advanced level) of a personal body of work. Prerequisite: ARTV 104 or 105, or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

ARTV 370 DESIGNING FOR SOCIAL SPACE (3)
This studio seminar considers a constellation of artistic developments of the last 40 years that employ social space and activity as important artistic venues or materials. The class will examine the impulse towards social engagement in art: the desire to make art beyond the gallery, to facilitate collective change, to practice a form of creativity beyond individual authorship, or to avoid the market’s hold on art. Through experiments, exercises and art projects, readings and lectures students will explore site-specific sculpture and installation, social sculpture, collaborations and artistic interactivity.

ARTV 371 SCULPTURE/LANDSCAPE (3)
A studio seminar course organized around the overlapping topics of landscape, sculpture and land art, Sculpture/Landscape is designed to offer intermediate and advanced Visual Arts students an opportunity to continue developing technical and conceptual skills in sculpture while also providing motivated students without experience an exciting entry to the discipline. Through technical exercises, studio projects, field trips, lectures, readings and discussions we will explore contemporary sculpture and installation practice in relation to the land and historical and contemporary ideas about land, all while taking advantage of San Diego’s year-round growing season, diverse micro-climates and post-modern botanical vocabulary.

ARTV 375 STUDY ABROAD IN VISUAL ARTS (3)
An investigation of site-specific issues or topics in visual arts, offered by a USD affiliated program abroad. Can be repeated once for credit. Two sections of ARTV 375 can be taken concurrently during a study abroad semester or summer.

ARTV 382 PUBLIC ART STUDIO SEMINAR (3)
This course focuses on the role of the artist outside of the gallery/museum context. Tangential to this investigation will be discussions that engage social, political, and urban issues relevant to this expanded public context. Traditional approaches of enhancement and commemoration will be examined in light of more temporal and critical methodologies. Historical examples will be studied and discussed, including the Soviet Constructivist experiments, the Situationists, Conceptual art and more recent interventionist strategies.

ARTV 401 ADVANCED VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS (3)
Advanced problem-solving, further analysis of form and meaning, and continued exploration of the historical and cultural issues in contemporary visual communications. Projects emphasize creative thinking and require the students to place greater emphasis on research, exploration, and preparation of work for final presentation. May be repeated for credit. Spring semester. Prerequisites: ARTV 103, 108, 300.

ARTV 403 ADVANCED DRAWING SEMINAR (3)
This course is designed to challenge students who have already demonstrated an intermediate level of proficiency in drawing. Lectures, reading discussions, and drawing projects will unfold throughout the semester around a single unified topic, resulting in a cohesive portfolio for the student. The course’s central topic will change every semester, enabling students to repeat the course without repeating its content. The following is a partial list of the topics that will be explored: representation, identity, and the narrative portrait; informed by nature: The landscape from the panoramic to the microscopic; the expressionist voice; techniques of the old masters; drawing the artists’ book. May be repeated for credit. Fall semester. Prerequisites: ARTV 101, 302.

ARTV 420 DIGITAL AUDIO COMPOSITION (3)
Analysis of historical and contemporary experimental music and sound provides the foundation for structured and creative composition using digitized sound. Includes an introduction to sampling, recording techniques, digital audio editing, effects processing, and mixing using Digital Performer and related software. Workshop format includes critique of work-in-progress and opportunities for public performance. Cross-listed as MUSC 420. Prerequisite: ARTH 109/MUSC 109 recommended, but not required. Prior musical experience not required.

ARTV 424 ART AND THE SOUNDSCAPE (3)
Artistic and scholarly investigation into the soundscape—the totality of the sonic environment invested with significance by human imagination. Creative work in media of the students choice, including new and cross-disciplinary media such as sound art, installation art, electronic music, phonography, instrument construction and the internet. Critical writing about creative work and its social and historical situation. Cross listed as MUSC 424. Recommended prerequisite: MUSC 109/ARTH 109.

ARTV 429 INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED PAINTING (3)
A multi-level course designed to refine the technical skills of intermediate and advanced students, while developing their individual concerns through a cohesive series of paintings. Assignments, presentations, and readings will challenge the student to consider a variety of thematic and stylistic approaches to the art of painting. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ARTV 328.

ARTV 478 SENIOR THESIS STUDIO SEMINAR (3)
A studio-seminar course designed for Visual Art majors in their senior year to help prepare them for ARTV 495 – Senior Thesis. Students will develop a mature body of work in their selected discipline(s) and formulate critical positions on their work through readings, lectures and cross-disciplinary discussions pertaining to a range of creative practices. Required for all Visual Art majors in their senior year. Fall semester.

ARTV 495 SENIOR THESIS (1)
This course requires the student to mount an exhibition of his or her most significant art work carried out during undergraduate education; present a written thesis that analyzes the development of, and influences on, his/her work; and participate in an oral defense of that thesis with the art faculty and their peers. Senior Thesis should be taken in the final semester of the senior year. Every semester.

ARTV 498 STUDIO INTERNSHIP (1-3)
The practice of the specialized skills, tools, basic materials and production techniques at local professional art and design studios under the direct supervision of their senior staff. Students will present a written report to the faculty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor prior to registration. Every semester.

ARTV 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
A project developed by the student in coordination with an instructor. The project should investigate in-depth a field of interest to the student not covered by established visual arts courses. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Art History Courses (ARTH)

ARTH 101 INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF ART (3)
This course is an introduction to many of the theories and methods that have been used by art historians. The visual foci will include conventional works of art as well as a variety of other visual media, including the museum setting and its strategies of display.

ARTH 109 INTRODUCTION TO SONIC ARTS (3)
A survey of the natural, cultural, historical and artistic experience of sound with an emphasis on the use of sound in artistic and critical engagements with the world. Topics include: acoustic ecology; philosophy of music; musical instrument technology; scientific and mathematical application of sound; radical challenges to musical traditions in the 20th century including electronic, experimental and improvised musics, installations and sound sculpture; technologies of sound reproduction; copyright and technological change; sampling; and DJ culture. Cross-listed as MUSC 109.

ARTH 133 INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY I (3)
A critical survey of western art history from prehistory through the Middle Ages.

ARTH 134 INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY II (3)
A critical survey of western art history from the Renaissance to the present.

ARTH 135 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ARCHITECTURE (3)
A survey of the intellectual origins, artistic concerns and utopian programs of the Modern Movement in architecture. Focusing on the years between 1870 and 1950, we will investigate a number of issues including the relation of architecture to modernism in art (especially painting and sculpture), and the common responses of artists and architects to the industrialization and mechanization of western society. The last section of the course will focus on postwar American architecture, the international style, and on the dissemination and transformation of modernist art in the developing world outside Europe and the United States. Cross-listed as ARCH 121.

ARTH 136 THE YEAR 1500: A GLOBAL HISTORY OF ART AND ARCHITECTURE (3)
This survey introduces students to the art and architecture of some of the many cultures that flourished around the year 1500: Italy and the Netherlands, the Ottoman empire, the Safavid dynasty in Iran, the rising Mughals in India, the Ming dynasty in China, and the Muromachi shogunate in Japan. The class discusses these artistic traditions in their own right, while at the same time emphasizing thematic and stylistic relationships and cross-cultural influences. In so doing, the survey challenges the primacy of European artistic norms, and invites instead the students to experience the diversity and complexity of the definition of art in the age of exploration.

ARTH 138 ART AND VISUAL CULTURE (3)
This introductory seminar is designed to introduce students to the questions and debates that propel art history and the methodologies that have shaped its unfolding shifts in strategy. While topics will vary from year to year, the central focus of the course will be constant: to equip students to look purposefully, critically, and contextually at images, mindful of the ways that meaning is produced and perceived.

ARTH 140 THE BUDDHIST TEMPLE (3)
This course considers the forms and roles taken by temples as they followed the spread of Buddhism across Asia and into America.

ARTH 275 STUDY ABROAD IN ART HISTORY (3)
An investigation of site-specific issues or topics in art history, offered by a USD affiliated program abroad. Can be repeated once for credit. Two sections of ARTH 275 can be taken concurrently during a study abroad semester or summer.

ARTH 330 SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN (3)
A focused investigation of select issues in architectural and design history. Topics vary. Cross-listed as ARCH 330.

ARTH 331 ART IN PUBLIC SPACES (3)
A consideration of the expressive import and historical context of art in public places, with emphasis on work since World War II.

ARTH 333 MODERN ART: 1780-1920 (3)
This course will examine the emergence of modern art in Western Europe during the years of radical transformation bracketed by the French Revolution and the First World War: from Jacques-Louis David’s images of Revolution and Empire, and Goya’s dissonant revelations of human irrationality, to the fragmentation of Cubism, irony of Dada, and subjectivity of Surrealism.

ARTH 334 ART OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY IN EUROPE AND THE AMERICAS (3)
From World War I to the close of the Cold War, from the advent of the movies to the electronic promiscuities of the Web, the unities of the modern world have dissolved into the multiplicities of postmodernity. The ways that art has intersected with the momentous shifts in life will be considered. In the utopian dreams of Constructivism, philosophical reveries of Cubism, subversions of Dada, and introversions of Surrealism and Expressionism, and in the low-brow allusion of pop art, unboundedness of performance art, and media-mimicking interventions of the 1990s, artists have probed the meaning of human experience and action in the 20th century.

ARTH 336 HISTORY AND THEORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
This course surveys the history of photography from its origins in the early 19th century to the present. Students will explore historical debates about photography’s status as a fine art, as well as current issues in photographic theory.

ARTH 338 CITY AND UTOPIA: INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY OF URBANISM (3)
This course surveys the relation between social and physical space in the formation of modern cities, as well as in the formation of modern disciplines, city planning, and urban design. It examines how the projects of social reform and political control shaped the grand urban projects and the “master plans” of the 19th and 20th centuries. This course is intended to introduce students to a history of ideas in modern urbanism and enhance their understanding of the city as a symbolic form. Cross-listed as ARCH 321.

ARTH 339 MUSEUM STUDIES (3)
An examination of the history, structure, philosophies and roles of museums, alternative spaces, and public art programs. The class will meet with a number of area museum professionals.

ARTH 340 CURATORIAL PRACTICE (3)
An introduction to the practice and history of curating exhibitions and collections. Students gain direct experience working with objects and exhibition planning in USD’s Hoehn Galleries. May be repeated for credit.

ARTH 341 EXHIBITION DESIGN (3)
A practical course in the design of museum and gallery exhibition installations. Students will deal with all aspects of presentation in the Hoehn Galleries, and will make use of local museum opportunities.

ARTH 342 CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE (3)
This course aims at a synoptic view of architectural theory in the 1970s and 1980s in order to offer an understanding of the present predicament of architecture and the city. We will discuss the “postmodern condition” as a global socioeconomic phenomenon and how a select group of architects and thinkers responded to this condition in the recent past. Cross-listed as ARCH 322.

ARTH 343 MEMORY, MONUMENT, MUSEUM: STUDIES IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION (3)
This class introduces students to the contemporary debates and practices in art, museology, and historic preservation by focusing on the changing definitions of the monument, the souvenir, collecting, collective memory, and the museum. Cross-listed as ARCH 323.

ARTH 344 BIOGRAPHIES OF WORLD CITIES (3)
This course is a focused survey of the arts and architecture of a great city throughout history. It examines how shifting social contexts and patronage shaped the monuments of art and architecture; how the function and meaning of these monuments have changed in subsequent stages of the city’s history; how the traces of past architecture—the archaeological strata—structure the city’s present form; and how the monuments record the individual experiences and collective memory of a city’s inhabitants. Students will learn to analyze art and architecture based on firsthand experience, field surveys, and faculty-guided research. Offered mainly as a study abroad course by the USD faculty during winter Intercession or summer programs. Cities may include Rome, Istanbul, Madrid, Paris, London, Mexico City, Los Angeles among others. Cross-listed as ARCH 340.

ARTH 345 THE AVANT-GARDE AND MASS CULTURE: ART AND POLITICS (3)
This course will examine the intersections between mass culture and the artistic movements in the first decades of the 20th century which came to be known as the “historical avant-garde.” Class discussions will focus on the question of aesthetic autonomy versus the social/political engagement of art. We will investigate the way the technologies of modern communication and mass media which made art available to a larger public at the beginning of the century — photographic reproduction, cinema, and, more recently, television — have transformed the production and reception of art.

ARTH 354 ART SINCE 1960 (3)
This course examines art of the past five decades in the United States, Europe and Asia. Moving from Pop, Conceptual, and performance art of the 1960s to installation, public intervention, and Internet art since 2000, the class will consider the ways that artistic strategies forge meaning within the frame of historical circumstance.

ARTH 355 THE CITY IN ART AND FILM (3)
This course will examine representations of the city in 20th- and 21st-century art and film. From the science fiction presentiments of Metropolis, Alphaville, and Blade Runner, to the suburban dystopia of American Beauty, the rhapsodic romanticism of Manhattan, and the engulfing megalopolis of Salaam Bombay, the city has figured as a powerful force and subject within film. So, too, artists have tackled the city not only as subject matter but as an arena in which to act. From the frenetic manifestations of the futurists and the pointed interventions of Krzysztof Wodiczko, Jenny Holzer, and Robert Irwin, to the populist strategies of Banksy and Rick Lowe, artists have moved into the real space of the world.

ARTH 356 RACE, ETHNICITY, ART, AND FILM (3)
This course examines representations of race and ethnicity in art and film. Focusing on work of the 20th and 21st centuries in the United States, students will consider the ways that theoretical perspectives and lived experience are articulated in art and film.

ARTH 375 STUDY ABROAD IN ART HISTORY (3)
An investigation of site-specific issues or topics in art history, offered by a USD affiliated program abroad. Can be repeated once for credit. Two sections of ARTH 375 can be taken concurrently during a study abroad semester or summer.

ARTH 382 PUBLIC ART STUDIO SEMINAR (3)
This course focuses on the role of the artist outside of the gallery/museum context. Tangential to this investigation will be discussions that engage social, political, and urban issues relevant to this expanded public context. Traditional approaches of enhancement and commemoration will be examined in light of more temporal and critical methodologies. Historical examples will be studied and discussed, including the Soviet constructivist experiments, the situationists, conceptual art, and more recent interventionist strategies.

ARTH 393 CRITICAL METHODS IN THE ANALYSIS OF VISUAL CULTURE (3)
An advanced seminar exploring current art historical debates, with special emphasis on the impact of critical theories (e.g. feminism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, deconstruction) on the practices of creating, looking at, and writing about works of art. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit.

ARTH 394 SEMINAR (3)
Discussion, research and writing focus in-depth on topics that shift each semester. Recent topics have included: Ends of Art: Histories of the Fin de Siècle; Colonialism and Art History; Li(v)es of the Artist: Biography and Art History; The American Home, 1850-1950; Chinoiserie and Japonisme; Asia Modern. Prerequisites: Any two Art History courses. May be repeated for credit. Art History majors are encouraged to take ARTH 394 concurrent with ARTH 495 during their senior year.

ARTH 395 METHODS IN ART HISTORY (3)
This seminar introduces art history students to some of the methods and theories that shape the interpretation of works of art. The course is based on the close reading and discussion of art historical texts that have influenced the development, aims, and practice of the discipline. Through a series of writing assignments, students will gain familiarity with various interpretative and analytical strategies, and be able to distinguish between different kinds of readings of artworks. Required for all Art History Majors. Prerequisites: Nine units in Art History. Art History students are strongly advised to enroll in this course during their junior year.

ARTH 495 SENIOR THESIS (1)
Each senior will conceive a research project drawing on historical, theoretical, and critical strategies. Students are encouraged to take ARTH 394 concurrent with ARTH 495. Every semester.

ARTH 498 MUSEUM INTERNSHIP (3)
Working firsthand with curators, exhibition designers, and registrars, in education programs, and in outreach and development offices at area museums, students gather crucial practical experience in the field. Prerequisites: at least one upper division art history course, and consent of the instructor. Every semester.

ARTH 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
A project developed by the student in coordination with an instructor. The project should investigate in-depth a field of interest to the student not covered by established art history courses. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and coordinator.

Architecture Courses (ARCH)

ARCH 101 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE STUDIO (4)
An introduction to the fundamentals of the discipline of architecture. Lectures survey the history and theory of building types, structures and functions, as well as focusing on the intersections of physical, cultural and social spaces. Students will acquire techniques of architectural representation through a series of drawing and model-making assignments of increasing complexity and scale. This class meets 6 hours per week (3 hours lecture, 3 hours studio/lab. Additional special workshop hours in the computer lab or woodshop may also be scheduled as needed).

ARCH 102 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO I (4)
In this studio, students explore and design housing types at different densities through the fundamental representational techniques of architecture: plan, section, elevation, axonometric projection and model-making. Under the theme of inhabitation, a series of assignments introduce the students to the various scales of architectural intervention, from the dimensions of the human body all the way to the territory of the city. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours studio/lab weekly. Additional special workshop hours in the computer lab or woodshop may also be scheduled as needed.)

ARCH 121 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ARCHITECTURE (3)
A survey of the intellectual origins, artistic concerns and utopian programs of the Modern Movement in architecture. Focusing on the years between 1870 and 1950, we will investigate a number of issues including the relation of architecture to modernism in art (especially painting and sculpture), and the common responses of artists and architects to the industrialization and mechanization of Western society. The last section of the course will focus on postwar American architecture, the International Style and on the dissemination and transformation of modernist art in the developing world outside Europe and the United States. Cross-listed as ARTH 135.

ARCH 275 STUDY ABROAD IN ARCHITECTURE (3)
An investigation of site-specific issues or topics in architecture and urbanism, offered by a USD affiliated program abroad. Can be repeated once for credit. Two sections of ARCH 275 can be taken concurrently during a study abroad semester or summer.

ARCH 301 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO II (4)
This design studio course explores architecture as a cultural practice that structures both the physical and the social environment. A number of exercises will introduce the students to questions surrounding a wide range of scales of inhabitation, from the scale of the body to that of the campus, city and region. The design studio will address the inherent material, environmental, cultural and social issues that form these questions. Students can also expect to reach technical competency in a full range of design media, including drawing, model-making and computer aided design. (3 hours of lecture, 3 hours of studio/lab weekly. Additional special workshop hours in the computer lab, metal or woodshop may also be scheduled as needed.) Prerequisite: ARCH 101 or 102, or the permission of the instructor.

ARCH 302 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VERTICAL STUDIO (4)
This is a thematic and thesis-driven studio that allows students of various levels and design skills to work together and learn from each other’s experiences. Interested Sophomores may be admitted to this course, along with Juniors and Seniors, provided that they have successfully completed ARCH 101 or 102 and obtained the instructor’s permission. The studio assignments will encourage teamwork, independent thinking and accelerated learning. (3 hours of lecture or faculty-lead seminar, 3 hours of studio/lab weekly. Additional special workshop hours in the computer lab, metal or woodshop may also be scheduled as needed.) Prerequisite: ARCH 101 or 102, or the permission of the instructor. ARCH 302 may be repeated for credit.

ARCH 321 CITY AND UTOPIA: INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY OF URBANISM (3)
This course surveys the relation between social and physical space in the formation of modern cities, as well as in the formation of modern disciplines, city planning and urban design. It examines how the projects of social reform and political control shaped the grand urban projects and the “master plans” of the 19th and 20th century. This course is intended to introduce students to a history of ideas in modern urbanism and enhance their understanding of the city as a symbolic form. Cross-listed as ARTH 338.

ARCH 322 CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE (3)
This course aims at a synoptic view of architectural theory in the 1970s and 1980s in order to offer an understanding of the present predicament of architecture and the city. We will discuss the “postmodern condition” as a global socioeconomic phenomenon and how a select group of architects and thinkers responded to this condition in the recent past. Cross-listed as ARTH 342.

ARCH 323 MEMORY, MONUMENT, MUSEUM: STUDIES IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION (3)
This class introduces students to the contemporary debates and practices in art, museology, and historic preservation by focusing on the changing definitions of the monument, the souvenir, collecting, collective memory and the museum. Cross-listed as ARTH 343.

ARCH 330 SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN (3)
A focused investigation of select issues in architectural and design history. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit. Cross-listed as ARTH 330.

ARCH 340 BIOGRAPHIES OF WORLD CITIES (3)
This course is a focused survey of the arts and architecture of a great city throughout history. It examines how shifting social contexts and patronage shaped the monuments of art and architecture; how the function and meaning of these monuments have changed in subsequent stages of the city’s history; how the traces of past architecture—the archaeological strata—structure the city’s present form; and how the monuments record the individual experiences and collective memory of a city’s inhabitants. Students will learn to analyze art and architecture based on firsthand experience, field surveys, and faculty-guided research. Offered mainly as a study abroad course by the USD faculty during winter Intercession or summer programs. Cities may include Rome, Istanbul, Madrid, Paris, London, Mexico City, and Los Angeles, among others. Cross-listed as ARTH 344.

ARCH 375 STUDY ABROAD IN ARCHITECTURE (3)
An investigation of site-specific issues or topics in architecture and urbanism, offered by a USD affiliated program abroad. Can be repeated once for credit. Two sections of ARCH 375 can be taken concurrently during a study abroad semester or summer.

ARCH 494 TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURE (3)
A focused investigation of select issues in architecture, architectural design or urbanism. May be repeated for credit.

ARCH 495 SENIOR PROJECT STUDIO SEMINAR (4)
A studio-seminar course designed for architecture majors in their Senior year to help them prepare for ARCH 496 Senior Thesis. Students will formulate critical positions through readings, lectures, design studio research, and cross-disciplinary discussions pertaining to a range of creative practices. 3 hours faculty-led seminar, 3 hours of studio/lab weekly. Prerequisite: ARCH 301 or 302.

ARCH 496 SENIOR THESIS IN ARCHITECTURE (1)
The Senior Thesis in architecture is an independent architectural design project on a theme chosen by the student. The thesis is an opportunity for each student to define an individual position with regard to a specific aspect of architectural practice. Students are expected to incorporate research, programming, and site definition within their design process, and present a written essay that discusses the development of their work. Each student is also required to participate in an oral defense of her/his design thesis with faculty and peers. Senior Thesis should be taken in the final semester of the senior year. Every semester. Prerequisite: ARCH 302 or 495.

ARCH 498 INTERNSHIP (1-3)
Students who are interested in pursuing internship in a professional architecture office or design studio, or attending the summer design program of an accredited professional school in architecture, are required to submit a written proposal to the faculty internship coordinator, describing their expected duties, the work-load and the corresponding units, the beginning and the end of the internship period and the name and the contact information of the senior staff who agreed to supervise their work. The faculty coordinator will approve the course units (1-3) after reviewing the proposal. Upon the completion of the internship or the summer program, students are required to promptly submit a portfolio, clearly delineating their individual contribution. The faculty internship coordinator will assign the course grade after reviewing each student’s portfolio.

ARCH 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
A project developed by the student in coordination with an instructor. The project should investigate in-depth a field of interest to the student not covered by established architecture courses. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.