Open Classrooms for Fall 2019

Sign up for your Fall 2019 Open Classroom

From October 7 to 31, attend an Open Classroom different than your LLC course to learn about how a different discipline connects to your LLC course and theme!

Registration for each Open Classroom is limited so sign-up soon! You must sign-up for an Open Classroom within your own LLC theme but that is different than your own LLC course and of a different academic dicipline of your Fall LLC course (i.e. if I am in Advocate in a Sociology course, I must sign up for an Open Classroom within the Advocate theme that is NOT a part of the Sociology academic discipline). Click on the title of the Open Classroom to register. All first-year students MUST be registered for an Open Classroom by Monday, September 30 at noon.

Should you run into any trouble while registering, please email llc@sandiego.edu.

Please note: Attendance at one Open Classroom event within your theme, participation in the Spring LLC Showcase, and completion of your Fall and Spring LLC courses fulfill the First-Year Integration Core requirement.

How is Science Done and Communicated

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Marjorie Patrick / BIOL 240 Bioenergetics and Systems

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 8 from 10:45 a.m. to 12:05 p.m. in Mother Rosalie Hill Hall 102 (Executive Classroom)

The scientific process provides structure to performing sound investigations and logically interpreting results. Understanding this process and how science is communicated to the general public enables even non-scientists the skill of identifying what is good science from pseudoscience, even in everyday life.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Mirrors of the Heart

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Kenneth Serbin / HIST 110 Modern Latin America (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 8 from 4 to 5:20 p.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 215

Before class, view the film “Mirrors of the Heart.” Main focus questions:

    • What term should we use to denote the "Indians" of the Americas? Why?
    • How do people in the Americas adapt in a changing world where skin color
      can mean so much?

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Can Religion Save Our Environment?

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Lance Nelson / THRS 203 World Religions and Environmental Concern (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Monday, October 14 from 5:30 to 6:50 p.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 211

We will discuss the relation between religious belief and practice, and the origins of the current environmental crisis. Is religion part of the problem, part of the solution, or maybe both?

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Latin American Advocates

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Alejandro Meter / LANG 142 Social Justice Latin America (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 15 from 10:45 a.m. to 12:05 p.m. Mother Rosalie Hill Hall 102 (Executive Classroom)

A survey of key actors who have fought for social, economic, racial, and environmental justice in Latin America.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Welfare Enhancing? An Economic View of Government Intervention

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Steve Sumner / ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics

Date / Time / Location: Wednesday, October 16 from 1 to 2:20 p.m. in Olin Hall 327

During the open classroom session we will investigate whether the well-being of society is improved by government intervention. We will look at several examples in which governments intervene including the provision of education, environmental protection, and the health care system.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Welfare Enhancing? An Economic View of Government Intervention

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Steve Sumner / ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics

Date / Time / Location: Wednesday, October 16 from 2:30 to 3:50 p.m. in Olin Hall 327

During the open classroom session we will investigate whether the well-being of society is improved by government intervention. We will look at several examples in which governments intervene including the provision of education, environmental protection, and the health care system.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Politics and Advocacy

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Emily Edmonds-Poli / POLS 170 Intro to International Relations

Date / Time / Location: Monday, October 21 from 11:15 a.m. to 12:10 p.m. in Kroc Institute for Peace & Justice 217A

What is the connection between politics and advocacy? Politics is advocacy!

Advocacy and social justice mean different things to different people. In the field of Political Science, we seek to understand and explain these differences. We also examine the ways in which people seek and use power to promote their version of social justice by setting up institutions and practices that influence both who holds power and how resources are distributed.

Politics (and therefore advocacy) happen at every societal level, but in POLS 170, the focus is on the international system of actors (e.g., countries, international organizations like the UN or WTO, and non-governmental organizations, like Apple, World Wildlife Fund, or Al-Qaeda) and how they seek to achieve their goals, which often include social justice.

In this open classroom, we will look at the connections between politics and advocacy and discuss the importance of understanding the political context for advocacy of any kind.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Deconstructing Islamophobia

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. May Fu / ETHN 100 Introduction to Ethnic Studies

Date / Time / Location: Monday, October 21 from 2:30 to 3:50 p.m. in Shiley Center for Science & Technology 232

Join us as we trace the emergence of Islamophobia; deconstruct the criminalization of Arab, Muslim, and Southwest Asian communities; and examine community resilience and resistance.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Efficient Relief Operations for Natural Disasters Relief

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Lenny Perry / ENGR 101 Introduction to Engineering AND Dr. Zhi-Yong Yin / EOSC 105 Natural Disasters

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 22 from 10:05 a.m. to 12:05 p.m. in Belanich Engineering Center 001

The classroom will cover the natural processes of hurricanes and mid-latitude cyclones and discuss methods to improve relief operations for disaster relief and recover.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Dystopic Integration

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Jason Crum / FYW 150 First-Year Writing (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Monday, October 28 from 10:10 to 11:05 a.m. in Mother Rosalie Hill Hall 133

This talk will look at recent dystopic novels, films, video games, and other media. We'll explore how they integrate multiple fields of study and reflect on how their narratives extrapolate from our own lived experiences.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Changemaking: Finding your Purpose

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Julia Cantzler / CHNG 101 Introduction to Changemaking (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 29 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 209

Changemaking is more than a set of tools and techniques for changing the world, it is also a mindset, a way of looking at things that is opportunity focused and creative. The first step to being a changemaker is discovering one's purpose. This workshop will walk students through the process of discovering their purpose so that they are well poised to seize upon opportunities to become active, empathetic and engaged changemakers here at USD and beyond.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Climate Change

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Zhi-Yong Yin / EOSC 105 Natural Disasters

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 29 from 7 to 8:00 p.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 209

We will discuss common misconceptions about climate change and how social justice is relevant in adaptation and mitigation of climate change.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Writing as a Form of Advocacy

LLC Faculty / Course: Vivienne MacAdam, M.A. / FYW 150 First-Year Writing (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Wednesday, October 30 from 12:20 to 1:15 p.m. in Maher Hall 224

An exploration of the different ways writing is used in advocacy, especially in giving voice to individuals and groups of people whose voices are marginalized or silenced by mainstream society.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.

Much Ado About Something: Shakespeare and Gender

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Jeanie Grant Moore / ENGL 240 Shakespeare (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Monday, October 7 from 1:25 to 2:20 p.m. in Warren Auditorium (Mother Rosalie Hill Hall 116)

Shakespeare’s plays, comic or tragic, nearly always stage significant social issues that remain significant problems in present-day society, and that offers us a chance not only to bring the relevance of Shakespeare into our modern world but also to relate it to our Collaborate theme of civic engagement.

I will focus on a comedy by Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, in which the false accusation of one young woman affects her, her relationship, her family, and her whole community. We will ask the question today, “To what extent does placing unwarranted blame on a female still exist, in what forms, and to what effect on our society as a whole”?

Some of my current Shakespeare students will help me highlight the issues in the play and connect them to ongoing concerns in our present-day society.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Consuming, Creating, and Sharing News as “Civic Engagement”

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Mary Brinson / COMM 130 Introduction to Media Studies (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Wednesday, October 9 from 12:20 to 1:15 p.m. in Camino Hall 108

With easy access to so much information, and digital technology at our fingertips– there is no excuse for any of us to be uninformed or uninvolved. We can use media to watch the Kardashians and share cute videos of baby goats – or we can use it be collaborators! People have started revolutions on FB, organized protests on Twitter, raised money for hurricane victims on GoFundMe, raised awareness for child soldiers in Africa on Youtube – the possibilities of collaboration via media are endless. But first and foremost, we need to be informed. We cannot be civic engagers, WE CANNOT BE COLLABORATORS - without being informed about the world around us. This discussion will address journalism in the digital age, and how we can be better informed and better collaborators by consuming and creating information that is truthful and powerful while avoiding propaganda and “fake news”.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Gender is Everywhere

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Lori Watson / GNDS 101 Introduction to Gender Studies (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Thursday, October 10 from 2:30 to 3:50 p.m. in Camino Hall 130

This class will explore the relevance of gender studies for other disciplines. The goal will be to illustrate the significance of gender for all other disciplinary concerns and investigations.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


The Economics of "Tales of Two Americas"

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Alan Gin / ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Wednesday, October 16 from 10:10 to 11:05 a.m. in Olin Hall 327

The Open Classroom will examine the economic underpinnings of the USD Just Read! text, "Tales of Two Americas." It will examine the economic forces leading to increased inequality and homelessness in the United States in general and in San Diego in particular. It will also explore possible policies to deal with those problems.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


The Economics of "Tales of Two Americas"

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Alan Gin / ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Wednesday, October 16 from 11:15 a.m. to 12:10 p.m. in Olin Hall 327

The Open Classroom will examine the economic underpinnings of the USD Just Read! text, "Tales of Two Americas." It will examine the economic forces leading to increased inequality and homelessness in the United States in general and in San Diego in particular. It will also explore possible policies to deal with those problems.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Media Persuasion: How Media Influences What We Think about Homelessness

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Carole Huston / COMM 101 Introduction to Human Communications (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Thursday, October 17 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 211

In this open classroom, you will hear about the positive and negative effects that media (e.g., news and social) can have in influencing our understanding of homelessness. Media messages can overtly and subtly influence our perceptions of certain groups of people, sets of events, or broader social issues through "framing" and "agenda-setting." Instead of negatively influencing perceptions, media processes can help us to become better educated and to work together to find effective solutions by partnering with urban planners, social workers, businesses, and government officials.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Why We Love and Hate Following Rules

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Lisa Nunn / SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 22 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 209

There are so many rules we have to follow in life: parents’ rules, school rules, workplace policies, laws from the government. There are even informal rules, expectations that our friends and communities expect us to live up to. Sociologists examine what happens when people do and don’t follow all those rules and the some of the good reasons for disobeying the rules in the name of dignity and social justice. Come learn about how we can bring these insights to motivate our own civic engagement.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


How to Plan your Vacation: Using Community Engagement Through Science

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Nathalie Reyns / EOSC 123 Organisms & Ecosystems

Date / Time / Location: Thursday, October 24 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 211

Learn how collaborating with other fellow citizens can help answer important scientific questions in diverse fields such as astronomy, biology, engineering, social sciences, psychology, computer sciences and more. We will discuss what it means to be a citizen scientist and explore ways to become civically engaged to enhance scientific knowledge. Data collected by citizen scientists might help you plan your next vacation!

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Future Hacks: Technologist-Based Collaborations for Civic Engagement

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Kathleen Kramer / ENGR 101 Introduction to Engineering

Date / Time / Location: Thursday, October 24 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in Belanich Engineering Center 001

Engineers design solutions, driving new inventions and progress in artificial intelligence and computing, energy and environment, communication and transportation, and sustainable and not-so-sustainable development. Technology-focused civic engagement is a collaboration of technologists with many others for advocacy and policy making needed to respond to the technical and non-technical implications of future and present innovation.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Growing Peaches in Montana? Bioenergetics and a Changing Climate

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Lisa Baird / BIOL 240 Bioenergetics and Systems (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Friday, October 25 from 8 to 8:55 a.m. in Olin Hall 129

Climate change has been in the headlines for many years. But what do you really know about climate and how it can impact how you live your life? Greenhouse gasses, temperature, glaciers, fires - and yes, growing peaches can tell us a lot about our changing climate.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


The Construction of Italian-American Identity

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Loredana Di Martino / LANG 141 The Italian American Experience

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 29 from 1 to 2 p.m. Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 212

Serving as an introduction to the cultural studies approach we use in the course, this open class will prompt students to reflect on how Italian American identity has been socially constructed and culturally renegotiated throughout time. Together, we will examine a sample of audiovisual and written texts that expose how power constructs discourses about ethnic identity that foster social fragmentation and oppression.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Thinking in Multiple Methodologies

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Tim Randell / FYW 150 First-Year Writing (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Wednesday, October 30 from 8 to 8:55 a.m. in Camino Hall 108

Learn how to think using multiple methodologies from various disciplines to reveal things you don't already know. In this lecture, you will learn how to achieve greater insight when interpreting literature, politics, anthropology, economics, psychology, gender studies, religion, and more.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.

Cultivate students do not need to register for an Open Classroom. Another faculty from your theme will be joining one of your regularly scheduled classes to guest lecture about their discipline. Please contact your LLC Faculty Advisor for more information.

Note for Illuminate Students: Please check with your LLC Faculty Advisor before registering for your Open Classroom. Some LLC Faculty Advisors would prefer that you sign-up for the Open Classroom that they are co-instructing and some do not have a preference.

How do STEM majors tackle challenges? A discussion of the scientific method and design thinking.

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Frank Jacobitz / ENGR 101 Introduction to Engineering AND Dr. Lauren Benz / CHEM 151 General Chemistry I

Date / Time / Location: Thursday, October 10 from 12:15 to 2:15 p.m. in Belanich Engineering Center 118

STEM majors share several courses during the first semesters of their respective curricula, but their work may follow two different approaches. This open classroom with introduce the scientific method used by scientists and mathematicians and the design thinking approach predominantly used in the engineering and technology fields.


Learning History Through Film: A Close Look at Women's Lives in China

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Yi Sun / HIST 130 East Asia Transformation (also offered as a Spring LLC course) AND Dr. Mei Yang / LANG 142 Myth to Fantasy: Asian Cinema (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 15 from 7 to 8 p.m. in Warren Auditorium (Mother Rosalie Hill Hall 116)

Films provide various perspectives on the question of a woman’s place within Chinese society and the prospects for emancipation from women’s previously oppressed position. Our joint lecture will discuss Chinese women’s lives during the 1930s when the communist movement was gaining momentum in the country and the portrayal of women’s situation in an iconic Chinese film, Yellow Earth. It will pay particular attention to the representation of women in the specific historical, political, and social contexts that the film set up and the role that cinematic technique plays in this portrayal.


What Makes Us Human—Perspectives from Biology and Film Studies

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Michael Mayer / BIOL 242 Genomes and Evolution AND Dr. Mei Yang / LANG 142 Myth to Fantasy: Asian Cinema (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Thursday, October 24 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 209

What is special about the human experience? From the perspectives of Japanese and American cinema, as well as Biology, we will discuss what, if anything, sets us apart from other species.


Is She Man Enough? Representations of Female Politicians in the Media

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Casey Dominguez / POLS 220 The Presidential Election of 2020 (also offered as a Spring LLC course) AND Dr. Susannah Stern / COMM 130 Intro to Media Studies

Date / Time / Location: Thursday, October 31 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in Warren Auditorium (Mother Rosalie Hill Hall 116)

This faculty exchange integrates the disciplines of media studies (communication) and political science in its discussion of how women in politics are covered by the mass media. The exchange will address patterns in media content, distinctions in coverage between male and female candidates, the effects of this coverage on perceptions of gender, and the effects of these patterns on politics and elections.

 

Media Ecology and Communication Studies

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. David Sullivan / COMM 130 Introduction to Media Studies (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Monday, October 7 from 9:05 to 10 a.m. in Camino Hall 110

This class session will address the media ecology approach to communication studies, summarizing how theoretical contributions from Harold Innis, Marshall McLuhan, and Neil Postman help explain media processes and effects today.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Matt Zwolinski / PPE 101 Morality, Markets and Government (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Monday, October 7 from 11:15 a.m. to 12:10 p.m. in Solomon Hall (in Maher Hall 240)

There is one important principle for making good economic decisions that almost everybody gets wrong in one context or another. And the effects of the resulting bad decisions on public policy can be disastrous. What is this principle, and what can the 19th century French economist Frederic Bastiat teach us about how it works, and how to avoid some common mistakes?

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Eric Jiang / COMP 110 Computational Problem Solving

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 8 from 9:35 to 10:35 a.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 153

This open classroom session provides a quick introduction to machine learning. It also discusses a variety of latest applications of machine learning and its potential impact on economy and society.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Kate DeConinck / THRS 113 World Religions in San Diego

Date / Time / Location: Wednesday, October 9 from 7 to 8 p.m. in Warren Auditorium (Mother Rosalie Hill Hall 116)

Earthquakes. Wildfires. Tsunamis. Hurricanes. When natural disasters strike, they can claim human lives, leave countless others unsheltered, threaten our sense of security, and/or interrupt our access to life-sustaining resources such as food or water. This session asks: How do religious communities and faith-based organizations address important social problems that emerge in the wake of disasters? Using a series of cases pulled from real life, we will discuss some of the creative and innovative strategies that religious groups have deployed in response to specific crises.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Rick Gonzalez / BIOL 240 Bioenergetics and Systems

Date / Time / Location: Friday, October 11 from 10:10 to 11:05 a.m. in Maher Hall 222

Innovations occurred over and over again in the history of life on earth generating the enormous diversity we see on the planet today. Such innovation is the consequence of the interplay of mutation and natural selection. How does that work?

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Mary Doak / THRS 114 Does God Speak? Intro to Catholic Theology

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 15 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 209

Many people believe that religious traditions are static, when in fact they change, develop, and innovate a great deal. This brief session will look at how Pope Francis has updated official Catholic teaching on nature not only in response to the environment but also in consideration of the need for more accurate interpretations of the biblical sources of Catholic belief.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Debbie Finocchio, MS / CHEM 151 General Chemistry I (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Thursday, October 17 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 209

Have you ever wondered about the scientific work being done related to climate change? In this interactive session, we will look at climate change evidence and innovations from the perspective of chemistry. (No science experience necessary!) We will also connect it to the chemistry-specific lines of Pope Francis’ encyclical, Laudato Si: On Care for Our Common Home as inspiration for wanting to learn more about this pressing real-world problem.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Shannon Starkey / ARCH 101 Introductory Design Studio

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 22 from 9:15 a.m to 12:05 p.m. in Camino Hall 43

Writing in the 1970s, Foucault argued that we live in the discipline society, one that started with prisons, but extended to hospitals, schools, and is now a logic under which we all operate. Architecture is the exemplar of the discipline society; through design it is subtlety controlling, monitoring, surveilling us, and reinforcing power structures. In class, our first project hinges on this idea, and students will be exhibiting disciplinary mechanisms they designed and produced out of steel. This project is done with collaboration with Professor Matt Rich and his color studio students.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


Color and Architecture

LLC Faculty / Course: Matt Rich, MFA / ARTV 102 Color

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 22 from 9:15 a.m. to 12:05 p.m. in Camino Hall 27

In this session, students will see and discuss how applied color can alter form in space. We will consider how color interacts with the surrounding environment, changes spatial perception, and impacts the viewer's emotional experience in relationship to specific three-dimensional forms.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Victoria Fu, MFA / ARTH 144 Introduction to Cinema

Date / Time / Location: Wednesday, October 23 from 2:30 to 5:20 p.m. in Camino Hall 20A

The course introduces students to look critically and imaginatively at the aesthetic tools of film. This includes a proficiency in the terminology and language of a film’s content, form and structure. This lecture will be focused on the dimensions of film editing: the relation of shot to shot.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Allison Wiese, MFA / ARTV 105 Introduction to Sculpture (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Thursday, October 24 from 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. in Camino Hall Patio 3

A performative lecture, brief discussion, and mini workshop introduce artistic practices that employ social space and activity as important artistic sites or materials for public artwork, ultimately introducing students to their next challenge: site-specific interventions for our campus.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Perla Myers / MATH 110 Investigations in Mathematics

Date / Time / Location: Thursday, October 24 from 12:30 to 2 p.m. in Maher Hall 207

In this class, you will 1) Engage in building and exploring polyhedra--3D structures made up of polygons; 2) Discover some amazing and beautiful shapes and surprising ideas; 3) Learn how/where these objects appear all around us--science, architecture, art, religion, etc.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.

LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Susie Paulik Babka / THRS 114 Art, Creativity & the Sacred (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Monday, October 28 from 7 to 8 p.m. in Manchester Auditorium (MACH 103) 

Art has the power not only to express the need for social justice but to move society toward creating social change. Art raises awareness and forms attitudes that encourage a vision of what is possible. This Open Classroom will consider the intersection of political and social consciousness with the change we want to see in the world.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Terry Bird / BIOL 242 Genomes and Evolution

Date / Time / Location: Tuesday, October 29 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in Saints Tekakwitha & Serra Hall 211

This class will examine evolutionary innovations that have converted a few microbes into pathogens that have spawn world wide epidemics. Emphasis will be given to pathogens associated with plagues that have significantly affected human society.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.


LLC Faculty / Course: Dr. Geoff Morse / BIOL 242 Genomes and Evolution (also offered as a Spring LLC course)

Date / Time / Location: Wednesday, October 30 from 7 to 8 p.m. in Warren Auditorium (Mother Rosalie Hill Hall 116)

Evolution is arguably the most innovative force in all of nature. This open classroom will examine how innovative tools such as Genomics, Imaging, and CRISPR are allowing us to gain a greater understanding of evolution from individual genomes to 3.5 billion years of biological diversity.

Do not choose this Open Classroom if you are currently regularly enrolled in this course or if your Fall LLC course is a part of the same academic discipline.