Courses Linked to the Innovate LLC

2019-2020

Please note: each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details).

ARCH 101: Introductory Design Studio

LLC Faculty: Dr. Shannon Starkey
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

An introduction to the fundamentals of the discipline of architecture. The purpose of this course is to offer, to any student, an introduction to the basic steps of design as it is done in architecture. Through a series of assignments of increasing complexity and scale, the studio explores the skills of drawing, sketching, and model building, and introduces a range of architectural ideas and issues that form the foundation of the discipline. Methods of instruction include studio work, desk critiques, tutorials, and lectures.


ARTH 144/ FILM 101: Introduction to Cinema

LLC Faculty: Victoria Fu, MFA
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 unit class

This course is an introduction to fil form and cinematic language, examining the historical, industrial, and cultural contexts that make form significant for analysis. This class aims to equip students to look purposefully, critically, and contextually at the moving image, mindful of the ways that meaning is produced and received.


ARTV 105: Introduction to Sculputre

LLC Faculty: Allison Wiese, MFA
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 unit class

An introductory studio course exploring the media and methods (from traditional representation to activist social practice) used to communicate in contemporary sculpture. We'll investigate sculptural form as a means of expression through studio projects, field trips, lectures, readings, and discussions. The course gives students na understanding of contemporary conceptual issues, materials, and strategies for art making in contexts that extend outisde the gallery into social and political spaces where the audience is part of the material of work. This LLC course is recommended for students interested in Visual Arts, Architecture, Art History, or Core Credit.


 

BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Richard Gonzalez
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

This course provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment. Lecture topics will include cellular respiration and photosynthesis, energy budges, and trophic interactions.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


BIOL 242: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Geoffrey Morse
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms. Concurrent registration in 242L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


BIOL 242: Genomes and Evolution

LLC Faculty: Dr. Terry Bird
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of information flow through organisms and their lineages. Lecture topics will include the use and change of hereditary information in DNA, the mechanisms of evolution, and the relationships among major groups of organisms. Concurrent registration in 242L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


CHEM 151: General Chemistry I

LLC Faculty: Dr. Debbie Finocchio
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Part 1 of a two semester lecture course which introduces the fundamental principles of modern chemistry. These principles, which include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, reactivity, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, bonding, acid-base chemistry, redox chemistry, and states of matter, will be used in and expanded upon in more advanced courses. Three lectures weekly.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed the Level 1 Math Placement Exam with a score of P, or the Level 2 Math Placement Exam M-130 with a score of P, to qualify for this course.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. David Sullivan
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course examines the development and operations of communication media in the U.S. Course material reviews the interplay among media, economic forces, advertising, technology, government, and audiences. Students should gain an enhanced understanding of the roles media play in individual and collective life in both historical and contemporary contexts.


COMP 110: Computational Problem Solving

LLC Faculty: Dr. Eric Jiang
Core AreaScience/Tech Inquiry | 3 units

Computer software is everywhere. It is behind the scenes of your favorite app, computer game, and website. It helps to control your car and every appliance you own. Companies use software to design, build, and sell their products. This list goes on and on. Computer Science is the study of the theory and practice of software development. This course is an introduction to comuter science, and in particular to the principles of computer programming. You will learn basic programminh constructs, such as conditional and iteration statements, by solving problems from different application areas. This is the first course taken by students who wish to major in computer science, but it also is an excellent option for students with interests in business, science, engineering, or the arts.

Course Requirement: Prerequisites of Math 115.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Susan Lord
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Introduction to the field of engineering. Students work in small teams to solve open-ended interdisciplinary design problems, including concept generation, analysis, computer aided design (CAD) modeling, construction, testing, development, and documentation. The project work is enhanced with lectures, activities, and reading on design, manufacturing, and engineering tools. Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering. Four hours lecture-laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of MATH 150.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Joel Alejandro Mejia
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Are you interested in being a changemaking engineer? Do you enjoy solving challenging, open-ended problems? If so, come join us and explore the field of engineering! In this class you will be introduced to the skills engineers need to succeed in today’s world. You will learn how to use modern engineering tools including computer-aided design, rapid prototyping, and electrical devices through hands-on projects culminating in the design of a small robotic vehicle. This course intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering but no prior experience with engineering is assumed.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Deborah Sundmacher, MA
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

Fulfills the core curriculum requirement for lower-division Written Communication. Develops skills in reading and critical analysis of multiple discourses. Develops writing within multiple discourses, and the transfer of those writing skills to multiple disciplines and occasions. Students practice the entire process of writing, from initial conception, through drafts, to revision and editing. Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed by trained peer-tutors. Must be taken in first year.


MATH 112: Folding Explorations in Mathematics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Perla Myers
Core Area: Mathematical Reasoning and Problem Solving | 3 units

What is mathematics? How can it enrich and improve your life? What do mathematicians think about and how fo they go about tackling challenging questions? Mathematics is much more than calculation; it is an artistic endeavor which requires both imagination and creativity to study patterns of all sorts, many of which are intrinsically beautiful, intriguing, and applicable to the real world. In this course, you will consider some of the greatest ideas of humankind in the realm of mathematics, some surprising and rewarding mathematical ideas. Along the way, you will confront issues that challenge your intuition, experience mathematical questions that have remained unsolved for hundreds of years, and gain sharper analytical reasoning skills. Get ready to gain an appreciation for mathematics, expand your mind, and discover the power of mathematical thinking in your everyday life.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 560 or greater, or an ACT score of 23 or greater, to qualify for this LLC course.


PPE 101: Morality, Markets, and Government

LLC Faculty: Dr. Matt Zwolinski
Core AreasEthical Inquiry | 3 units

This course provides introduction to the interdisciplinary cluster of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. Students will be introduced to some of the key intellectual tools from each of these disciplines, and shown how they can be used together to shed light on important theoretical and practical debates in morality, economics, and politics. Topics covered may include the nature and justification of property rights, the uses and limits of market prices in coordinating economic activity, the role of government regulation in correcting market failure, the nature and significance of key moral ideas such as distributive justice, freedom, and equality, and the application of these ideas to key policy debates such as health care, environmental regulation, and social welfare policy.


THEA 230: Acting I

LLC Faculty: Lisa Berger, MFA
Core AreaArtistic Inquiry | 3 units

This course examines the tradition of the actor as storyteller and challenges students to increase their ability to express their own experience and the experience of others. It involves improvisation, monologue, and scene work, technical methods in voice, physical action, and text analysis. Satisfies the core curriculum fine arts requirement.


THRS 113: World Religions in San Diego

LLC Faculty: Dr. Kate DeConinck
Core AreaTheo/Religious Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1| 3 units

How might deeper understanding of religion in today's world lead to more meaningful forms of pluralism and democratic engagement in the United States? This course introduces students to some of the world's "major" religions--Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam--through use of a lived religion approach. We will study the history, texts, and core beliefs/practices of a given faith community as well as how it comes to life in particular ways in San Diego. As part of this course, students work in teams to complete an ethnographic project, mapping issues and debated relevant to local religious communities.


THRS 114: Art, Creativity, & the Sacred

LLC Faculty: Dr. Susie Babka
Core AreaTheo/Religious Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1| 3 units

Theology explores life's biggest questions: Does God exist? Would it matter one way or the other? What does it mean to be human? Can anything really be done about poverty, racism, injustice? These questions stem from considering what it means to believe in a reality greater than ourselves, an ultimate or infinite reality, the truth of existence. This course explores the creative impulse of the human being, traced through attentiveness to beauty, artistic expression and innovative solutions to scientific and social problems, as the frame in which to understand the Good, the search for God and the doing of justice.

 

 

ARCH 101: Introductory Design Studio

LLC Faculty: Dr. Shannon Starkey
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

An introduction to the fundamentals of the discipline of architecture. The purpose of this course is to offer, to any student, an introduction to the basic steps of design as it is done in architecture. Through a series of assignments of increasing complexity and scale, the studio explores the skills of drawing, sketching, and model building, and introduces a range of architectural ideas and issues that form the foundation of the discipline. Methods of instruction include studio work, desk critiques, tutorials, and lectures.


ARTV 105: Introduction to Sculputre

LLC Faculty: Allison Wiese, MFA
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 unit class

An introductory studio course exploring the media and methods (from traditional representation to activist social practice) used to communicate in contemporary sculpture. We'll investigate sculptural form as a means of expression through studio projects, field trips, lectures, readings, and discussions. The course gives students na understanding of contemporary conceptual issues, materials, and strategies for art making in contexts that extend outisde the gallery into social and political spaces where the audience is part of the material of work. This LLC course is recommended for students interested in Visual Arts, Architecture, Art History, or Core Credit.


BIOL 113: Plants and People

LLC Faculty: Marcy Darby, MA
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

What are the major ways that plants and plant products contribute to human life and how have humans modified plants and their environments? Biology 113, Plants and People, is a one-semester course (Science and Technological Inquiry Core Area) that endeavors to answer these questions. It is about humans and their knowledge, uses, and abuses of plants. The biology of plants is considered from a scientific viewpoint; drawing on topics of anatomy, morphology, physiology, ecology, evolution, taxonomy, and biotechnology. The basis of this course is science literacy, defined as citizen-level fluency for comprehending the process through which science’s way of knowing brings understanding of the natural world. 4 units: 3 hours of lecture and one 4-hour lab, weekly.


CHEM 152: General Chemistry II

LLC Faculty: Dr. Debbie Finocchio
Core Area: 3 units

Part 2 of a two semester lecture course which introduces the fundamental principles of modern chemistry. These principles, which include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, reactivity, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, bonding, acid-base chemistry, redox chemistry, and states of matter, will be used in and expanded upon in more advanced courses. Three lectures weekly.

Course Requirement: Prerequisites of CHEM 151 and CHEM 151L


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. David Sullivan
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course examines the development and operations of communication media in the U.S. Course material reviews the interplay among media, economic forces, advertising, technology, government, and audiences. Students should gain an enhanced understanding of the roles media play in individual and collective life in both historical and contemporary contexts.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Amanda Moulder
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

FYW fulfills the Core curriculum requirement for lower-division Written Communication. The course develops skills in reading and critical analysis of multiple discourses. Students will develop writing within multiple discourses, and the transfer of those writing skills to multiple disciplines and occasions. Students will also practice the entire process of writing, from initial conception, through drafts, to revision and editing.


PPE 101: Morality, Markets, and Government

LLC Faculty: Dr. Matt Zwolinski
Core AreasEthical Inquiry | 3 units

This course provides introduction to the interdisciplinary cluster of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. Students will be introduced to some of the key intellectual tools from each of these disciplines, and shown how they can be used together to shed light on important theoretical and practical debates in morality, economics, and politics. Topics covered may include the nature and justification of property rights, the uses and limits of market prices in coordinating economic activity, the role of government regulation in correcting market failure, the nature and significance of key moral ideas such as distributive justice, freedom, and equality, and the application of these ideas to key policy debates such as health care, environmental regulation, and social welfare policy.


THEA 230: Acting I

LLC Faculty: Lisa Berger, MFA
Core AreaArtistic Inquiry | 3 units

This course examines the tradition of the actor as storyteller and challenges students to increase their ability to express their own experience and the experience of others. It involves improvisation, monologue, and scene work, technical methods in voice, physical action, and text analysis. Satisfies the core curriculum fine arts requirement.


THRS 113: World Religions in San Diego

LLC Faculty: Dr. Kate DeConinck
Core AreaTheo/Religious Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1| 3 units

How might deeper understanding of religion in today's world lead to more meaningful forms of pluralism and democratic engagement in the United States? This course introduces students to some of the world's "major" religions--Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam--through use of a lived religion approach. We will study the history, texts, and core beliefs/practices of a given faith community as well as how it comes to life in particular ways in San Diego. As part of this course, students work in teams to complete an ethnographic project, mapping issues and debated relevant to local religious communities.


THRS 114: Art, Creativity, & the Sacred

LLC Faculty: Dr. Susie Babka
Core AreaTheo/Religious Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1| 3 units

Theology explores life's biggest questions: Does God exist? Would it matter one way or the other? What does it mean to be human? Can anything really be done about poverty, racism, injustice? These questions stem from considering what it means to believe in a reality greater than ourselves, an ultimate or infinite reality, the truth of existence. This course explores the creative impulse of the human being, traced through attentiveness to beauty, artistic expression and innovative solutions to scientific and social problems, as the frame in which to understand the Good, the search for God and the doing of justice.