Courses Linked to the Cultivate LLC

2019-2020

Please note: each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details).

ANTH 101: Introduction to Biological Anthropology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jennifer Parkinson
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

This course examines human origins and adaptation through a focus on evolutionary mechanisms, genetics, comparative primate biology, the human fossil record, and modern human variation. This course illustrates how core biological concepts relate to our understanding of the origins of our species, as well as exposing the connections between humans and non-human primates. Throughout the course, there will be an emphasis on the ways in which scientists learn about human evolution and the significance of human evolution for understanding humans today. As a lab course, students will conduct hands-on genetics exercises, work with fossil casts and skeletal material, and observe the behavior of living primates at the San Diego Zoo.


COMM 101: Introduction to Human Communication

LLC Faculty: Dr. Leeva Chung
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Oral Communication Competency | 3 units

This introductory course explores how communication shapes your identity, (non) verbal styles, interpersonal relationships, decision making, and conflict negotiation. The course surveys the breadth of the best practices across the discipline of communication. Healthy, competent communication requires effectiveness, measured by our ways to cultivate initiatives for future generations.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alyson Ma
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

Have you ever wondered why things happen the way they do? What is the motivation for offering grants to college students? How does the iPhone contribute to the U.S. trade deficit? Why do firms offer new variations of their existing products? How does innovation lead to economic growth? Should price discrimination be allowed? This course is an introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, and an introduction to market structure. We will use the economic framework to interpret real world events and economic policies. The goal of this course is to prepare you to critically judge complex issues facing the world economy.


ENGL 226: Nature Quests

LLC Faculty: Bradley Melekian, M.F.A.
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

In this course, we will examine the genre of quest literature, particularly as it relates to the perceived transformative power of the natural world, and the ways in which authors have examined the interplay between the two. We will examine works that combine the tradition of literary nature writing with the tradition of quest literature, studying the perceived power of excursions into nature as a path to personal development, across fictive and non-fictive genres. Questions central to this course: What emotional states drive people to such quests? What questions do such seekers hope that solitary nature experiences will answer? How does the literature that arises from such experiences lead to a better understanding of self, or, conversely, destroy the concept of self? How does the solitary quest into an often harsh uncaring natural environment forcec contemplation? We will read works ranging from Henry David Thoreau's account of a solitary life in Walden to Jon Krakauer's journalistic investigation of the life of Christopher McCandless in Into the Wild to Cheryl Strayed’s Wild.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Imane Khalil
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

Introduction to the field of engineering. Students work in small teams to solve open-ended interdisciplinary design problems, including concept generation, analysis, computer aided design (CAD) modeling, construction, testing, development, and documentation. The project work is enhanced with lectures, activities, and reading on design, manufacturing, and engineering tools. Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering. Four hours lecture -laboratory weekly.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Lisa Smith, M.A.
Core Area: 
First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

Students read and explore works of fiction and non-fiction (Carson, McCarthy, Murakami, Hersey) that examine the disastrous effects of human scientific "achievement" on the environment and consider the ways writers, through these varied discourses, reveal and predict many current (and possibly future) outcomes and how these works can serve as cautionary tales for us in the present moment. We think about the importance of cultivating the imagination and bringing it to bear on the past and future in order to find solutions to our current dilemmas.


HIST 160: U.S. History of Food

LLC Faculty: Dr. Colin Fisher
Core Area: Historical Inquiry and Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

What does food tell us about the American historical experience? How did Pre-Columbian Native Americans sustain themselves on the land? In what ways is food a window on European colonization and plantation slavery? How did urbanization and industrialization change food production and consumption? What does food tell us about the immigrant experience and changing gender relations? What are the ecological and labor consequences of industrial farming during the 20th century and early 21st century? We will ask these questions and many others. Learning will take place in class and also during a number of field trips.


MATH 150: Calculus 1

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jane Friedman
Core Area: Mathematical Reasoning Competency | 4 unit class w/ lab

Introduction to Calculus with applications. This course will introduce students to the power of rigorous, conceptual mathematical reasoning. Limits, derivatives, and an introduction to Integration will be covered. Students will apply calculus concepts.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed MATH 115, or passed the appropriate department placement test within the previous year, to qualify for this LLC course.


PHYS 270: Introduction to Mechanics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Ryan McGorty
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

A study of the fundamental principles of how things move involving Newton's laws of motion and momentum and energy conservation laws. Harmonic oscillations and wave motion will also be covered.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed MATH 150 or MATH 151 to qualify for this LLC course.

 

COMM 101: Introduction to Human Communication

LLC Faculty: Dr. Leeva Chung
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Oral Communication Competency | 3 units

This introductory course explores how communication shapes your identity, (non) verbal styles, interpersonal relationships, decision making, and conflict negotiation. The course surveys the breadth of the best practices across the discipline of communication. Healthy, competent communication requires effectiveness, measured by our ways to cultivate initiatives for future generations.


ENGL 226: Nature Quests

LLC Faculty: Bradley Melekian, M.F.A.
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

In this course, we will examine the genre of quest literature, particularly as it relates to the perceived transformative power of the natural world, and the ways in which authors have examined the interplay between the two. We will examine works that combine the tradition of literary nature writing with the tradition of quest literature, studying the perceived power of excursions into nature as a path to personal development, across fictive and non-fictive genres. Questions central to this course: What emotional states drive people to such quests? What questions do such seekers hope that solitary nature experiences will answer? How does the literature that arises from such experiences lead to a better understanding of self, or, conversely, destroy the concept of self? How does the solitary quest into an often harsh uncaring natural environment forcec contemplation? We will read works ranging from Henry David Thoreau's account of a solitary life in Walden to Jon Krakauer's journalistic investigation of the life of Christopher McCandless in Into the Wild to Cheryl Strayed’s Wild.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Lisa Smith, M.A.
Core Area: 
First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

Students read and explore works of fiction and non-fiction (Carson, McCarthy, Murakami, Hersey) that examine the disastrous effects of human scientific "achievement" on the environment and consider the ways writers, through these varied discourses, reveal and predict many current (and possibly future) outcomes and how these works can serve as cautionary tales for us in the present moment. We think about the importance of cultivating the imagination and bringing it to bear on the past and future in order to find solutions to our current dilemmas.


HIST 160: U.S. History of Food

LLC Faculty: Dr. Colin Fisher
Core Area: Historical Inquiry and Critical Thinking/Information Literacy | 3 units

What does food tell us about the American historical experience? How did Pre-Columbian Native Americans sustain themselves on the land? In what ways is food a window on European colonization and plantation slavery? How did urbanization and industrialization change food production and consumption? What does food tell us about the immigrant experience and changing gender relations? What are the ecological and labor consequences of industrial farming during the 20th century and early 21st century? We will ask these questions and many others. Learning will take place in class and also during a number of field trips.


PHYS 270: Introduction to Mechanics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Ryan McGorty
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

A study of the fundamental principles of how things move involving Newton's laws of motion and momentum and energy conservation laws. Harmonic oscillations and wave motion will also be covered.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed MATH 150 or MATH 151 to qualify for this LLC course.


THRS 114: Spirituality and Struggle

LLC Faculty: Dr. Victor Carmona
Core Area: Theological and Religious Inquiry | 3 units