Courses Linked to the Collaborate LLC

2019-2020

Please note: each of the courses below fulfills the First-Year Integration Core requirement, and most fulfill at least one other core area (see individual course listings for details). All Spring LLC Collaborate courses will have an LLC Hour attached to the course from 7 to 8 p.m. on Wednesdays.  

ARTV 102: Color

LLC Faculty: Matt Rich, MFA
Core Areas: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

In this studio course, students create color-based art projects in a variety of media through directed assignments. Studio projects are supplemented by lectures, readings, and discussions on the theory and history of color and its applied uses in contemporary art and design. Topics may include the science of color and its industrial production; cultural connotations of color; strategies and color techniques used by artists. References to a wide range of creative genres and media will highlight connections across a broad range of disciplinary perspectives. Students can use a variety of material sources and techniques--including paint, photography, collage, projected or cast light, found objects and digital formats or outputs, for example--to demonstrate color principles and to produce color-driven projects.


BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lisa Baird
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment. Lecture topics will include cellular respiration and photosynthesis, organismal physiology and locomotion, and ecological interactions. Concurrent registration in 240L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


COMM 101: Introduction to Human Communications

LLC Faculty: Dr. Carole Huston
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Oral Communication Competency | 3 units

An examination of the principles and contexts of human communication. Some of the principles surveyed are perception, listening, nonverbal communication, and persuasion. The primary contexts examined include interpersonal, group, organizational, and public communication. This course is a prerequisite for all upper division communication studies courses, and fulfills a core curriculum requirement in oral communication and the social sciences.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

Preceptor: Dr. Mary Brinson
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course will pay special attention to how young people and media professionals can (and should) create, consume and engage with media in a way that is productive politically, ethically, civically, and socially. We will investigate how, throughout time, the various forms of media have been used by generations to collaborate and advocate for social change. The course will allow students to investigate and understand how they, as engaged citizens and collaborators, can use mass communication and technology to be civically engaged, and advocate for social justice and social change themselves.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alan Gin
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

An introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, an introduction to market structure, market equilibrium, market failures, the workings of input markets, international trade and the role of the government in the economy.


ENGL 240: Shakespeare

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jeanie Moore
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

One does not have to look far to find connections between the works of Shakespeare and our Collaborate theme of Civic Engagement. Shakespeare’s plays, comic or tragic, nearly always stage significant social issues that remain crucial problems in present-day society. We will discover those parallels as we examine such plays as The Merchant of Venice, which presents a view of a prejudiced social order that ghettoized Jews and sometimes demonized them. The recent novel by Howard Jacobson, Shylock is My Name, brings these issues into a 21st-century setting, where anti-Semitism still exists. We will connect the campus Hillel Center to assist us as we ask ourselves what we can do in the real presence of such hatred in our community and country.


ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

LLC Faculty: Dr. Kathleen Kramer
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 units

Introduction to the field of engineering. Students work in small teams to solve open-ended interdisciplinary design problems, including concept generation, analysis, computer aided design (CAD) modeling, construction, testing, development, and documentation. The project work is enhanced with lectures, activities, and engineering. Four hours lecture-laboratory weekly.

Course Requirement: Students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, MATH 150 to qualify for this LLC course.


EOSC 123: Organisms and Ecosystems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Nathalie Reyns
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

Curious about organisms and their adaptations to natural environments? Students will learn about the characteristics of different organisms, fundamental principles in ecology (why do some populations boom, and some go bust?), and gain exposure to the challenges species face while living in different environments including terrestrial, freshwater, and marine realms. This is a required course for EOSC majors, and satisfies the core curriculum requirement for life science with laboratory.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Tim Randell
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course offers intensive practice in the writing process to help you become a more engaged citizen of a participatory democracy. Texts create social, political, and cultural “realities,” oftentimes by using non-straightforward aspects of language, including literary strategies and subtle rhetorical forms. Such strategies can be found in news articles, opinion pages, academic journals, advertising, political slogans, literature, and in the values, assumptions, and perspectives of diverse cultural groups. This course will help you grasp the purpose and function of rhetorical elements, traditions, and conventions while exploring issues of contemporary concern that fall under various categories, including race/ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, and philosophical and religious belief. Students will contribute in various rhetorical contexts and genres to ongoing conversations and debates as part of the Collaborate Living and Learning Community (LLC). Assignments will include a final collaborative group research and writing project comprised of multiple discourses and discourse communities.


GNDS 101: Introduction to Gender Studies

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lori Watson
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Global Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This course aims to offer an introduction to gender studies. The course will begin by examining the distinction between sex and gender, as well as how that distinction is employed in discussions of sexuality. Specifically, we will examine the so-called "nature" vs. "nurture" debate, and the most recent scientific claims about innate sex differences. Next, the course will look into contemporary debates on sex work: prostitution and trafficking. From here we will engage critically with pornography in contemporary society. Is pornography harmful? Is it best understood a protected speech? How are sex workers treated within pornography? Are they oppressed? Are they workers like any other? Next, we will turn to examine the role of gender in inequality in the workplace and the relationship to inequality within the family. Finally, we will also examine the debate around rape on college campuses and Title IX.


LANG 141: Narratives of the Mexico-US Border

LLC Faculty: Dr. Amanda Petersen
Core Areas: Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

This special-topic course explores the experience of the border in literary, cultural, and filmic narratives in order to encourage students to critically reflect on the space of the Mexico-U.S. border, a space that is essential for understanding what it means to study in San Diego. Students will read and view narratives (in English or with subtitles) from the regions surrounding the border, from both northern Mexico and the U.S. The narratives reveal the depth and diversity of the experience of living on and around the border, with particular emphasis on narratives that deal with Baja California. They will become familiar with important theories surrounding border narratives as well. Questions of privilege and the social injustices that they cause will be central for in-class discussions.


LANG 141: The Italian American Experience 

LLC Faculty: Dr. Loredana Di Martino
Core Areas: Literary Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Wops, Dagoes, Guineas: what is the meaning of these terms? How can a deeper understanding of America's (and San Diego's) immigrant past help us build a better future? Focusing on Italian Americans, this course will reconstruct the experience of those "undesirable" groups that came from Southern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, while examining their changing identity over time. We will discuss important issues related to diversity, inclusion and social justice, while reflecting on the strategies used by writers and filmmakers to challenge discourses about ethnicity that foster oppression. Course taught in English without pre-requisites.


SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lisa Nunn
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Introduces students to basic concepts of sociology: groups, social institutions, race, class, gender, etc. Approach is broad, focusing on U.S. issues of power, inequality, social change and social justice.

ARTV 160: Introductory Photography

LLC Faculty: Andy Cross, MFA
Core Area: Artistic Inquiry | 3 units

This course guides students to discover the way they see and establishes core relationships to formal and conceptual photographic principles through lectures and studio practice. Students develop bodies of work using department equipment and the analog black and white lab, and must purchase materials as required. Lab fee required.


BIOL 240: Bioenergetics and Systems

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lisa Baird
Core Area: Scientific and Technological Inquiry | 3 unit class w/ lab

This one-semester course for biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of energy flow within cells and between organisms and the environment. Lecture topics will include cellular respiration and photosynthesis, organismal physiology and locomotion, and ecological interactions. Concurrent registration in 240L is strongly recommended, and required for Core credit.

Course Requirement: Students must have a Math SAT score of 630 or greater to qualify for this LLC course.


COMM 101: Introduction to Human Communications

LLC Faculty: Dr. Carole Huston
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Oral Communication Competency | 3 units

An examination of the principles and contexts of human communication. Some of the principles surveyed are perception, listening, nonverbal communication, and persuasion. The primary contexts examined include interpersonal, group, organizational, and public communication. This course is a prerequisite for all upper division communication studies courses, and fulfills a core curriculum requirement in oral communication and the social sciences.


COMM 130: Introduction to Media Studies

Preceptor: Dr. Mary Brinson
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

This course will pay special attention to how young people and media professionals can (and should) create, consume and engage with media in a way that is productive politically, ethically, civically, and socially. We will investigate how, throughout time, the various forms of media have been used by generations to collaborate and advocate for social change. The course will allow students to investigate and understand how they, as engaged citizens and collaborators, can use mass communication and technology to be civically engaged, and advocate for social justice and social change themselves.


ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

LLC Faculty: Dr. Alan Gin
Core Area: Social and Behavioral Inquiry | 3 units

An introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, an introduction to market structure, market equilibrium, market failures, the workings of input markets, international trade and the role of the government in the economy.


ENGL 240: Shakespeare

LLC Faculty: Dr. Jeanie Moore
Core Area: Literary Inquiry | 3 units

One does not have to look far to find connections between the works of Shakespeare and our Collaborate theme of Civic Engagement. Shakespeare’s plays, comic or tragic, nearly always stage significant social issues that remain crucial problems in present-day society. We will discover those parallels as we examine such plays as The Merchant of Venice, which presents a view of a prejudiced social order that ghettoized Jews and sometimes demonized them. The recent novel by Howard Jacobson, Shylock is My Name, brings these issues into a 21st-century setting, where anti-Semitism still exists. We will connect the campus Hillel Center to assist us as we ask ourselves what we can do in the real presence of such hatred in our community and country.


FYW 150: First-Year Writing

LLC Faculty: Dr. Tim Randell
Core Area: First-Year Writing Competency | 3 units

This course offers intensive practice in the writing process to help you become a more engaged citizen of a participatory democracy. Texts create social, political, and cultural “realities,” oftentimes by using non-straightforward aspects of language, including literary strategies and subtle rhetorical forms. Such strategies can be found in news articles, opinion pages, academic journals, advertising, political slogans, literature, and in the values, assumptions, and perspectives of diverse cultural groups. This course will help you grasp the purpose and function of rhetorical elements, traditions, and conventions while exploring issues of contemporary concern that fall under various categories, including race/ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, and philosophical and religious belief. Students will contribute in various rhetorical contexts and genres to ongoing conversations and debates as part of the Collaborate Living and Learning Community (LLC). Assignments will include a final collaborative group research and writing project comprised of multiple discourses and discourse communities.


SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology

LLC Faculty: Dr. Lisa Nunn
Core Areas: Social and Behavioral Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1 | 3 units

Introduces students to basic concepts of sociology: groups, social institutions, race, class, gender, etc. Approach is broad, focusing on U.S. issues of power, inequality, social change and social justice.


THRS 114: Good, Evil and Origanal Justice

LLC Faculty: Peter Bennett
Core Areas: Theo/Religious Inquiry; Domestic Diversity Level 1| 3 units

This course introduces students to the methods and content of Christian theology, with particular emphasis on Catholic theological traditions. In addition to theological method, topics may include the scriptures, history of the church and/or theology, the nature of theological discourse, and examination of select topics or issues in theology.