Spring 2021 Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions Spring 2021

FYW 110: Preparation for College Writing

Deborah Sundmacher

Formerly English 110: Intro to College Writing for ESL Students.
A writing class designed for non-native speakers of English to prepare them take FYW 150.  Instruction in fundamentals of various modes of written expression, including English grammar, sentence structure, understanding the importance of audience, editing and revision.  Readings are selected from both non-fiction and fiction prose.  Students are required to use the Writing Center, staffed by trained peer-tutors.
Preparation course for FYW 150

 

FYW 150: First Year Writing

Various Professors

Fulfills the core curriculum requirement in lower-division written literacy for students entering USD in or after the Fall of 2017. Develops skills in reading and critical analysis of multiple discourses. Develops writing within multiple discourses, and the transfer of those writing skills to multiple disciplines and occasions. Students practice the entire process for writing, from initial conception, through drafts, to revision and editing. Students are encouraged to use the Writing Center, staffed and trained by peer-tutors.
Must be taken in the first year. 

English 215: Children's Literature - CRN 2055

Lisa Smith, MWF 1:25-2:20pm

Literary and popular texts produced for children. Emphasis on analysis of how children's texts construct gender, sex, race, class, family structure, power relations, and violence, for example. Includes phonemic awareness, word analysis, and field experience. Reserved for students in credential programs.

For Liberal Studies majors.

English 220-01 & 02: L.A. Apocalyptic - CRN 2056 & 3928

Halina Duraj, TR 7:45-9:05AM & 9:15-10:35AM

This last year, California found itself at the intersection of two massive global crises—the coronavirus pandemic and climate disaster. The state is currently experiencing its highest number of wildfires in history, with the most acres burned in a single year on record before the official wildfire season has even begun. Almost everyone in the state has experienced the effects of the fires—if not actual evacuation, then smoky skies and ash. Unsurprisingly, news stories about California this summer frequently refer to the state’s “apocalyptic” conditions—a place where you need a face mask for two reasons: to protect you from a deadly virus and hazardous air quality. These current events merely echo a long tradition of invoking the apocalypse in the Golden State—and Southern California in general. In an essay about his love-hate relationship with Los Angeles, author Matthew Specktor writes, “I’m enthralled by Los Angeles because it’s ugly and problematic and lovely, because the bomb has already fallen on it, to some extent, and all I can do is pick my way through the ruins.” Specktor is not the only author who invokes apocalyptic disaster when writing of L.A and California in general; in fact, California is the setting for numerous works of speculative, post-apocalyptic literary fiction, including, Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Carolyn See’s Golden Days, Claire Vaye Watkins’s Gold Fame Citrus, and Mary Miller’s The Last Days of California. Some of these dystopias emerge from environmental disaster, others from nuclear disaster, social unrest, or religious prophecy. In this course, we’ll examine some of these novels, as well as other works that illuminate this conundrum: why is California, and especially Southern California, so often a setting for the post-apocalyptic imagination in literature and film? What about this place—its history, culture, economy, geography, landscape and geological features—suggests disaster? California is often seen as the cutting-edge state—where nationwide social, economic, and environmental trends begin. As Governor Newsom often says, “The future happens here first.” What does it mean for the nation as a whole if California is indeed a harbinger? And if disaster is imminent, as these narratives suggest— what do these narratives also suggest about our power to prevent or mitigate it? We’ll explore these questions in the context of the state’s history as well as current events.

English 220 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 220-80: Modernists to Music-Makers: 20th Century American Poetry - CRN 3929

Deniz Perin-Coombs, MWF 8:00-8:55AM

Poetry is finely woven into the fabric of our lives, whether we realize it or not. From prayer to song, and in between, it is often through poetry that we grow into and come to terms with life’s many trials and rewards. This course will explore the work of 20th century American poets, as well as some contemporary artists. We will read and discuss a wide range of works, starting with realist Robert Frost at the beginning of the 20th century, through to subsequent literary movements and artists spanning the last 100 years, including those who make use of oral forms, such as spoken word poets and musicians. This is an “Innovation” LLC course, and as such, we will, in various formats, discuss and respond to the innovation of these artists and, where applicable the movements with which they are associated. Writing will include analytical, personal, and creative responses to the material, and a final project will include an Integration Assignment.

Section 80 is LLC only.  English 220 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.

English 226-06 & 07: The Ghost Story - CRN 3930 & 3931

Ivan Ortiz, MWF 10:10-11:05AM & 11:15AM-12:10PM

Readings in a particular body of literature, which may be defined formally, topically, ethnically, or otherwise, as it develops over a period of time.

English 226 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.

English 226-90: Monstrosity, Humanity, and Otherness (Studies in Literary Traditions) – CRN 4453

Sara Hasselbach, TR 4:00-5:20PM

An overarching theme we will be exploring in this course is what it means to be human. Using speculative fiction, novels, essays, poetry, television, and film, we will think about how subjectivity and representation relate to alternative constructions, depictions, and experiences of human reality. “We never see other people anyway,” writes Colson Whitehead, “only the monsters we make of them.” How do portrayals of imagined creatures—aliens, sentient robots, monsters, fairies, anthropomorphized animals—help us to “see other people” (to use Whitehead’s phrase) or to better understand ourselves? How might expressions of the other unveil anxieties about the self? Course authors and media may include: Isaac Asimov, Margaret Atwood, Toni Morrison, Edgar Allan Poe, Mary Shelley, Brent Staples, Bram Stoker, The Twilight Zone, The Babadook, Get Out, and Over the Garden Wall.

Section 90 is Preceptorial only. English 226 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.

 

English 230-01: Bodies of Knowledge: Representations of Bodies in U.S. Lit. – CRN 2061

Rachel Oriol, TR 9:15-10:35AM

Literary representations of bodies are fundamental to understanding the way knowledge is created, archived, and passed on. We may read authors like Nella Larsen, Ernest Hemingway, Ana Castillo, Brett Easton Ellis, and Carmen Maria Machado (among others) who use bodies to engage in themes like disability, beauty, gender, death, and race. From these themes we will investigate how representations of embodied knowledge aid in the imaginative process.

Fulfills Diversity, Inclusion, Social Justice. English 230 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.

 

English 230-02: Studies in U.S. Literature: Poetry – CRN 2062

Alexis Jackson, MWF 12:20-1:15PM

And because we Black people in North America persist in an irony profound, Black poetry persists in this way:

Like the trees of winter and 
like the snow which has no power 
makes very little sound 
but comes and collects itself 
edible light on the black trees 
The tall black trees of winter 
lifting up a poetry of snow 
so that we may be astounded 
by the poems of Black 
trees inside a cold environment

June Jordan
“The Difficult Miracle of Black Poetry in America: Something like a sonnet for Phillis Wheatley” (2006).

African American women have used various art forms to explore and explode imposed concepts of identity to reimage a truer version of the self. In this course, we will explore the work of African American women poets in conversation with the work of African American women performers.  We will study the ways these writers use imposed poetic and lyrical formal structures (e.g.. sonnets, ghazals, etc.) to challenge the politics of to reshape identity.  We will engage with the work of artists like Phillis Wheatley, Nina Simone, Gwendolyn Brooks, Morgan Parker, and Beyoncé to discuss the impact these women have on our understanding of contemporary poetry, experimental poetry, and American identity.

Fulfills Diversity, Inclusion, Social Justice. English 230 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.

 

English 230-03 & 04: Food, Love, and Stories - CRN 4456 & 4457

Koonyong Kim, TR 5:30-6:50PM & W 4:00-6:50PM

This course examines contemporary literature and film through the lens of food and love. Far from being just something we eat for sustenance, food is embedded in an intricate network of economic, cultural, historical, and ecological values and practices. For example, food oftentimes functions as a marker or metaphor for various issues such as collective identity (national, ethnic, and religious), class differentiation, body image and gender formations, globalization, and sustainability, among others. Likewise, love is not simply an interpersonal relationship; it is also inextricably linked to diverse psychological, epistemological, and social issues. Centering our inquiry on the complex meanings of food and love as portrayed in a wide range of stories in literature and film, we will reflect on how such fundamentally basic elements in our life as food and love are interrelated, what signification they have in our society, and how they can help us better understand ourselves, other people, and the world. 

Fulfills Diversity, Inclusion, Social Justice. English 230 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor. 

English 236-02 Studies in World Literature - CRN 4527

Joanne Spiegel, MWF 12:20-1:15pm

This course will be filled with fresh, interesting contemporary writers. Because the world is changing so rapidly, both socially and politically, new, young writers who are interested in exploring these changes are emerging from all over the globe.  If you take this class, you can expect a diverse array of voices, many of whom are asking provocative questions about the world. The reading list will include both comic and serious fiction and possibly some genre fiction including one graphic novel.  We will read literature from Japan, Pakistan, Africa, India and several other countries. Together we’ll explore what makes the books exciting aesthetically and thematically and how the stories reflect the changing face of the world.

English 236 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.

English 236-04: Studies in World Literature - CRN 3933

Vivienne MacAdam, MWF 9:05-10:00am

Readings in some period or aspect of literature outside England and the United States. Works not originally in English will be read in translation.

English 236 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 240-02: Shakespeare - CRN 2858

Stefan Vander Elst, TR 10:45AM-12:05PM

This course will explore some of the most important dramatic works of William Shakespeare, arguably the greatest English playwright of all time. We will explore the language of each play individually and discuss major themes, stakes and metaphors that connect the plays to each other. Finally, we will look at the greater historical, political and intellectual circumstances of Elizabethan England in order to contextualize Shakespeare and his works.

This course will satisfy the Shakespeare requirement in the old Major, and count as a lower division elective in the new Major. English 240 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.  

English 240-03: Shakespeare – CRN 3934

Maura Giles Watson, MW 2:30-3:50PM & MW 4:00-5:20PM

Shakespeare was born 457 years ago, yet he remains tremendously popular and we still read, study, and perform the works attributed to him. In this course, participants will learn about the language, drama, and poetry of William Shakespeare (1564-1616), and about the historical contexts and contemporary controversies surrounding Shakespeare’s works. Toward these goals, we will read, analyze, and discuss plays from each of the Shakespearean dramatic genres: comedy, tragedy, history play, ‘problem play’, and romance. Course participants will perform ‘walking read-throughs’ of selected scenes, and we will also read and discuss approximately 30 of the 154 sonnets. We will study these works within the early modern literary, theatrical, cultural, print, political, economic, and religious contexts that contribute so much to our appreciation and understanding. In addition, we will discuss the pressing issues of gender, power, race, injustice, and violence that frequently emerge in these works, and we will critique the textual and dramatic representations of socially marginalized people at the dawn of Renaissance Europe’s exploitive encounters with Africa and the Americas.

This course will satisfy the Shakespeare requirement in the old Major, and count as a lower division elective in the new Major. English 240 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.

 

English 240-80: Shakespeare - CRN 2859

Jeanie Grant Moore, MWF 10:10-11:05am

Shakespeare 240 is part of the LLC Collaborate theme, which focuses on civic engagement. The event of a play actually creates civic engagement, since in a public gathering theatre may do much more than entertain: it often presents relevant cultural concerns as it challenges the status quo of the dominant society. Even though written 400 years ago, Shakespeare’s plays, comic or tragic, nearly always stage significant social issues that remain significant problems in present-day society. For example, in Much Ado About Nothing the false accusation of one young woman affects her, her relationship, her family, and her whole community. We will ask the question, “To what extent does placing unwarranted blame on a female still exist today, in what forms, and to what effect on our society as a whole”?  Also, Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice presents a view of an anti-Semitic social order that ghettoized Jews and sometimes demonized them. Unfortunately, anti-Semitism still exists in our country today, so it is all too easy to find connections to the present. These and other plays in their own historical context will provide rich ground to explore the past and relate it to current cultural issues.

Section 80 is LLC only. This course will satisfy the Shakespeare requirement in the old Major, and count as a lower division elective in the new Major. English 240 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.

English 250-01: Literary Foundations - CRN 2068

Jeanie Grant Moore, MWF 11:15am-12:10pm

Are you ready to embark on ten centuries of literature? It is an immense span of time for one semester, but we will sweep through the years, attempting to achieve some depth as well as breadth, progressing from the Old English Beowulf through the medieval and Renaissance periods, moving on through the Restoration, and finishing with “The Age of Reason,” the 18th Century. We will pay particular attention to the historical, political, and social contexts of the works we read, explore our personal relationship to them, and consider various modern approaches to literature as we think critically about these texts.

Note: This course is required for the new major, but students continuing in the old major are welcome to take it as a lower-division elective. English 250 meets the core literature requirement in both the old and new core and counts towards the English major or minor.

 

English 260-01 & 02: Critical Reading – CRN 2069 & 3937

Carlton Floyd, TR 5:30-6:50PM & TR 7:00-8:20PM

Course description coming soon! (email cfloyd@sandiego.edu for more info)

Required for new major. Counts as lower division elective in the old major.

 

English 292: Southeast San Diego Tutoring Project

Timothy Randell

This is a ten-week course/internship during which you will tutor children in a local elementary or middle school in basic reading, writing, and math (depending on your assigned teacher/class). You will work at the school to which you are assigned with a teacher who will structure your activities with the children. Each week you will write a short journal to reflect on your experiences concerning a specific element of the school, your pupils, and other experiences concerning lesson plans or the learning environment. You will turn in the journal assignments periodically throughout the semester (not once a week or all at once at the end of the semester) to ensure accurate, unhurried, and thoughtful reflection. Tutors may commit to 3, 6, or 9 hours of tutoring per week (for 1, 2, or 3 academic credits per semester, respectively), and the course may be taken more than once (as often as tutors wish) to accommodate academic needs and time schedules.
The course counts for English elective credit. Lower Division students register for English 292, and Upper Division students register for English 492.

English 301-01: Intro to Creative Writing - CRN 2073

Deniz Perin-Coombs, MWF 9:05-10:00AM

This course is geared to a disciplined learning and honing of the writing craft. To that end, students will read, write, revise, and think deeply about many works of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. There are four main components to the course: reading, writing, workshop, and revision. 1) Students will read published works, giving them sincere thought, and preparing to discuss them in class. 2) Students will write several poems, at least one memoir, and one or more fictional work(s), as well as keep a daily “observatory,” or observations journal and do several prompted writings. 3) This course is also a workshop: students will thoughtfully read the work of peers, offering helpful, detailed feedback on their pieces. 4) An essential part of the writing process is to revise. At the end of the semester, final portfolios will include revisions of every workshopped piece. Last but not least, students will be expected to attend the Cropper Memorial Writers Series readings/events that take place on campus this semester. This course runs on the understanding that every registered student has a sincere desire to be a creative writer—or to explore the craft in new ways—and is dedicated to the work and time necessary to move toward that goal.

Required course for Emphasis in Creative Writing and may be taken for English upper-division elective units.

English 301-02: Intro to Creative Writing - CRN 2074

Adam Veal, TR 4:00-5:20PM

This course is an introduction to three genres: fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.  We will learn some conventions and rules for each genre, as well as how to buck those conventions and rules through experimentation.  This course is also an introduction to the workshop method of critique.  Learning how to workshop teaches students the basic terminology and methods of offering constructive critique in a community setting.  Because so much of this class will focus on building community, discussion, and in-class writing exercises, attendance in this class is mandatory.  Students will be expected to produce two revised and polished pieces in each genre by the end of the semester.

Required course for Emphasis in Creative Writing and may be taken for English upper-division elective units.

English 304-01: Advanced Composition - CRN 2860

Timothy Randell, MWF 9:05-10:00am

Advanced Composition offers intensive practice in active reading, critical thinking, and close analyses of texts and writing within various rhetorical situations, genres, and discourse communities. The course highlights academic skills such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. It emphasizes an understanding of what Wayne Booth calls “the rhetorical stance,” which includes “discovering and maintaining in any writing situation a proper balance” among three aspects of the communicative process: “the available arguments about the subject itself; the interests and peculiarities of the audience; and the voice (the implied character) of the speaker.” This course asks students to consider how different audiences and contexts shape the rhetorical situation. We will analyze texts from popular culture in class to explore ideas related to the assignments, and you will research examples of popular culture on your own as part of your writing projects.

Fulfills core requirement for Advanced Writing only for non-English majors.  May be taken by English majors for upper division elective credits.

English 304-02: Advanced Composition: Texts and Contexts in Professional Writing - CRN 2861

Megan Little, MWF 12:20-1:15PM

English 304 is “a workshop course in the writing of expository, descriptive, and critical prose. This course is designed to fulfill the upper division written literacy requirement for non-English majors.”  In this version of E304, students will learn advanced discourse conventions in selected disciplines (including their own). We will explore the writing work academics, engineers, scientists, public advocates, and others perform by studying their professional contexts and examples of their work. We will also read ethnographic studies of writing in workplace settings and other environments, as students learn from and emulate experts in their fields.

Fulfills core requirement for Advanced Writing only for non-English majors.  May be taken by English majors for upper division elective credits.

English 304-03: Advanced Composition - CRN 2862

Vivienne MacAdam, MWF 10:10-11:05am

This course is a workshop course in the writing of expository, descriptive and critical prose. Texts may include: Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Of Love and Other Demons; Nadine Gordimer, Jump and Other Stories; Michael Ondaatje, Running in the Family; J.M. Coetzee, Foe; and Haruiki Murakami, Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World.

Fulfills core requirement for Advanced Writing only for non-English majors.  May be taken by English majors for upper division elective credits.

 

English 304-04: Advanced Composition – CRN 3938

Lisa Smith, MWF 11:15AM-12:10PM

A workshop course in the writing of expository, descriptive, and critical prose. This course is designed to fulfill the upper division written literacy requirement for non-English majors; it will fulfill an upper division elective for English majors.

Fulfills core requirement for Advanced Writing only for non-English majors. May be taken by English majors for upper division elective credits.

English 304-05: Advanced Composition – CRN 4690

Irene Williams, TR 10:45AM-12:05PM

A workshop course in the writing of expository, descriptive, and critical prose. This course is designed to fulfill the upper division written literacy requirement for non-English majors; it will fulfill an upper division elective for English majors.

Fulfills core requirement for Advanced Writing only for non-English majors. May be taken by English majors for upper division elective credits.

English 304-06: Advanced Composition – CRN 4692

Sr. Mary Hotz, MWF 8:00-8:55AM

A workshop course in the writing of expository, descriptive, and critical prose. This course is designed to fulfill the upper division written literacy requirement for non-English majors; it will fulfill an upper division elective for English majors.

Fulfills core requirement for Advanced Writing only for non-English majors. May be taken by English majors for upper division elective credits.

English 311-01: Whom Gods Destroy: Myth and Religion in Greek Tragedy – CRN 3939

Maura Giles Watson, W 6:00-8:50PM

This course provides a comprehensive study of the ways in which Greek myth and religion shaped both the form and the content of the Greek tragedies written and performed in fifth-century BCE Athens. Readings (in English translation) will include a representative selection of plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. We will focus on major deities – such as Zeus, Apollo, Artemis, Aphrodite, and Dionysus – and their relationships with mortals; aspects of cult, worship, and ritual within the polytheistic system; the function of myth and the ways that the tragic playwrights transformed myth into drama; the origins and elements of tragic drama and performance (including the Athenian City Dionysia, verse, dance, and the use of masks); the Aristotelian concept of the ‘tragic hero’; and the distinctive styles and perspectives of each playwright. The course will be conducted as a seminar based on close readings, critical textual engagement, class discussions, and mini-lectures to introduce new concepts.

Satisfies the Literary Histories requirement of the new English major. Fulfills 1660-1900 requirement in the old major. May be taken for upper-division elective units in the English major.

English 315-01: Shakespeare: Source Texts and Adaptations – CRN 3940

Sara Hasselbach, TR 5:30-6:50PM

In this course, we will read Shakespeare’s plays alongside their source material and the modern adaptations that they inspired. We will examine how power and agency can fall upon new hands through the creative energies of adaptation and interpretation. Compared to their source texts, what do Shakespeare’s plays hold steady or change? And how do adaptations reshape Shakespeare’s content in ways that reflect the cultural values from which they emerge? From “fair Verona” to California’s Verona Beach, from Venice to an American high school basketball court, we will follow Shakespeare’s texts through time and space to better understand their shifting—and their constant—priorities. Plays may include: King Lear, Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, Othello, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Twelfth Night.

Satisfies the Literary Histories requirement of the new English major. Fulfills 1660-1900 requirement in the old major. May be taken for upper-division elective units in the English major.

English 319-01: Frankenstein: Contexts & Legacies – CRN 2075

Ivan Ortiz, TR 2:30-3:50PM

This course will consider the contexts and legacies of Mary Shelley’s influential novel, Frankenstein; or, the Modern Prometheus (1818). Long regarded as a masterpiece of fiction and a cultural touchstone, Frankenstein raises universal questions about the nature of science and technology, politics, religion, education, psychology, and gender. It is also considered a seminal text in the traditions of Gothic literature, science fiction, sentimental literature, Romanticism, and post-humanism. Students in this course will read and discuss literary, political, and scientific texts that Mary Shelley read to write Frankenstein, as well as works of literature, philosophy, and film that were influenced by her radical novel. Special attention will be paid to Frankenstein’s afterlife in scientific and philosophical thinking about artificial intelligence. Authors to be explored include John Milton, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Percy Shelley, Erasmus Darwin, and Donna Haraway.

Satisfies the Literary Histories requirement of the new English major. Fulfills 1660-1900 requirement in the old major. May be taken for upper-division elective units in the English major.

English 319-02: The Old World and The New – CRN 3941

Jeanie Grant Moore, MW 2:30-3:50PM

This course will explore the ways that British and American people have viewed and evaluated one another over time. Works of various literary genres, historical documents, and artworks will provide kaleidoscopic perspectives of relations between the two countries as they have developed a unique friendship. The personal and the political will intertwine in this transatlantic journey, as we immerse ourselves, for example, in the revolutionary wit of Abigail Adams, the humor of Mark Twain, the insights of Charles Dickens, or the amusing satire of Oscar Wilde. Beginning with early encounters in the Renaissance, and moving through the 18th Century and the Victorian Age, we will track the sometimes rocky path toward what Winston Churchill called our “Special Relationship.” The course will encourage us to think of our own society from the vantage point of non-Americans, whose views are sometimes misconceived and at other times very penetrating.

Satisfies the Literary Histories requirement of the new English major. Fulfills 1660-1900 requirement in the old major.

English 321-01: Literature of Race, Gender, & Sexuality - CRN 2863

Marcelle Maese, TR 10:45AM-12:05PM

What does the expression “man of his word” mean? What kinds of sexed and gendered social contracts does language enact and revise?  What is the relationship between language and self-understanding? Can literature contribute to the myriad forms of discourse that inform how we understand ourselves in relation to others? This course will consider these questions from the perspective of U.S. Third World Feminist and Queer Women of Color Literatures. We will begin with a review of early Chicano, Black Power, and American Indian writings on anti-colonialism and decolonization, and then place these writings in dialogue with the foundational anthology This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color. By way of conclusion, we will study the formal experimentation of Gloria Anzaldúa, Audre Lorde, and Leslie Marmon Silko.

Satisfies the Literary Cultures and Theories requirement of the new English major. Fulfills 1900 to Present requirement in the old major. Counts as an upper-division elective for the old & new major.

English 329-01: Writers Daring to be Different – CRN 2076

Irene Williams, TR 9:15-10:35AM

We will be reading literature by four writers—Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Gertrude Stein, Audre Lorde, and Patti Smith—and also investigating published scholarship about their work.  Class is seminar-style, with an expectation that students will be willing to read aloud in class, as well as to study and discuss writings that challenge readers’ tolerance for perplexity.  Considerable reading and rereading and writing and rewriting in order to practice skills of critical analysis and imaginative response.  Independent thinkers welcome.

Satisfies the Literary Cultures and Theories requirement of the new English major. Fulfills 1900 to Present requirement in the old major. Counts as an upper-division elective for the old & new major.

 

English 333-01: Chaucer - CRN 2662

Stefan Vander Elst, TR 2:30-3:50pm

This course offers an in-depth look at the works of the medieval English poet Geoffrey Chaucer (1343-1400). Widely credited with reviving English as a literary language after a long period of Latin and French domination, Chaucer compiled an extensive and varied body of works. We will discuss Chaucer’s writings from his earliest poems to his last and greatest work, the Canterbury Tales. We will devote special attention to Chaucer’s use of continental literary traditions; we will see how works such as Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, the Romance of the Rose, and Boccaccio’s Decameron influenced Chaucer, and helped him create a truly English literature of wit and learning.

Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major. Fulfills 1660-1900 requirement in the old major.

 

English 358-01: U.S. Ethnic Literature - CRN 2432

Carlton Floyd, W 6:00-8:50pm

Course description coming soon!  (Email cfloyd@sandiego.edu for more information)

Literary inquiry; Domestic Diversity level 1; Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

English 358-02: Indigenous Literatures and Rhetorics – CRN 3942

Sr. Mary Hotz, MWF 9:05-10:00AM

Students in this course will study the literary and rhetorical techniques, devices, and conventions that Indigenous peoples have used and continue to use to build community and engage in cross-cultural encounters. Scholars of Indigenous texts emphasize that this body of work is most responsibly read and best understood from Indigenous critical perspectives. With this theoretical framework in mind, we will analyze the meaning-making strategies in a variety of Indigenous texts while attending to issues of sovereignty, community, and responsibility.

Literary inquiry; Domestic Diversity level 1; Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

English 358-70: Contemporary U.S. Ethnic Dystopias - CRN 2078

Jason Crum, MWF 12:20-1:15pm

This course will examine late 20th & early 21st Century Ethnic Dystopian fiction and popular culture in the United States. Our sources for this cultural studies course will be varied and will include recent trends in literature, film, digital storytelling, graphic novels, & video games. We will trace the development of imaginings and re-imaginings of utopia, their exclusions and gaps, and seek to examine how ethnic and racial minorities in the United States have contested such ideas as utopia/dystopia, class, race, gender, & sexuality. Readings will include works such as Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, NK Jemisin’s The Fifth Season, Chang-Rae Lee’s On Such a Full Sea, Samuel Delany’s Trouble on Triton, Nedi Okorafor’s Lagoon, Cynthia Khodata’s In the Heart of the Valley of Love. We will also turn to and look analytically at the political, social, and economic climate that allows for the portrayal of ethnicity in recent pop culture titles such as Alex Rivera’s Sleep Dealer and Alfonso Cuaron’s Children of Men and video game productions such as Bioshock: Infinite.

Section 70 is TLC only. Literary inquiry; Domestic Diversity level 1; Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

 

English 364-01: Global Literature & Culture - CRN 2866

Rachel Oriol, TR 7:45-9:05AM

Engaging with issues of literary representation within a historical framework, this course examines literature from various geographical regions that may include Africa, South Asia, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and the Caribbean. We may read works by Manuel Puig, Marjane Satrapi, Michael Ondaatje, Nora Okja Keller, and Kazuo Ishiguro, among others. From these representations, we will investigate the ways in which history and literature push definitions of nation, imagination, and belonging.

Literary Inquiry; Global diversity level 2

English 364-02: Global Literature & Culture: The Ideology of Superiority: Racism and Colonialism in Early Modern English Texts - CRN# 4691

Maura Giles Watson, MW 4:00-5:20PM

In ‘The Ideology of Superiority’ we will study, discuss, and write about late Renaissance/Early Modern English texts in which ideologies (or, idea systems) of racism emerge, and we will analyze these texts’ participation in histories of colonialism, violence, slavery, and oppression as they pertain to notions of difference from and superiority to Jews, Africans, Egyptians, Indigenous peoples of the Americas and the Caribbean, and to the Welsh, Scottish, and Irish peoples whom the English long sought to subdue. We will turn a critical eye as well to the English ‘Triangle Trade’ (in indentured servants from Ireland and Britain, slaves from Africa, and sugar and tobacco from the Caribbean and Virginia, respectively), which develops in the 16th century then rapidly expands in the 17th, while greatly enriching the City of London, the English shipping industry, the incipient insurance industry (whose original purpose was to insure slave ships), the merchant class, and the aristocracy. The works we will study include plays by Shakespeare, court masques by Ben Jonson, edicts of Queen Elizabeth I, and – as Ireland was the earliest laboratory for the English colonial project – we will also read the anti-Irish tracts written by Edmund Spenser and John Milton. In these contexts, we will apply concepts from Critical Race Theory and Post-Colonial Theory to critique the effects of racialized violence, slavery, and oppression contained within these works and within documentary sources, such as ship-owner William Bullock’s popular 1649 colonial-settler recruitment tract, Virginia Impartially Examined. We will analyze the ways that these texts are both products of and productive of colonialist perspectives on Indigenous peoples and peoples of color; explore the role of such literature in the reproduction of structural racism over the last four centuries; and, finally, through the more recent writings of Otegha Uwagba and Ta-Nehisi Coates, we will examine the gap separating principle (anti-racism) from implementation (redistributive justice) in contemporary white allyship activism.

Literary Inquiry; Global diversity level 2

English 372-01: Film Noir – CRN 3943

Fred Robinson, M 4:00-7:50PM/W 4:00-5:20PM

A study of a style of film that emerged, in the U.S. of the 1940s, from the experience and aftermath of war.  It is marked by crime and by the attempt to “solve” it in a time of moral disequilibrium, with its persistent instability, blurred boundaries, and ambiguous characters, all wrapped in a shadow atmosphere.  We will note the origins of noir in German Expressionist film and touch on recent examples of the style, but our focus will be on the world and style of the1940s: conflicted, tough-guy cops, detectives and villains, dark cities, and women who will either kiss or shoot you, or both.  We will also study the cinematic ways in which this world is evoked: shifting points of view, sharp angles and unsteady framing, low lighting and deep focus, and, of course, night.  Students should realize that most of the films will be in black and white.

Films (subject to change) Double Indemnity, The Killers, Nightmare Alley, Out of the Past, The Third Man (British), The Lady from Shanghai, The Night of the Hunter, Elevator to the Gallows (French), Kiss Me Deadly, Chinatown, The Attack (Lebanese), Tell No One (French).

English 401-01: Advanced Poetry Writing - CRN 2299

Alexis Jackson, MWF 10:10-11:05AM

“The boiling of an egg is heavy art,” wrote Gwendolyn Brooks in her ars poetica titled “The Egg Boiler.” In this intensive poetry workshop course, we will practice the “heavy art” of composing and studying poetry. Students will study various genres and forms of poetry, write poems after these genres and forms, share/workshop their pieces, and revise their work to develop a final portfolio of their own work. The course will first explore foundational poetic theory and will then move into a weekly study of a different genre/form.  Some topics we will focus on include cadence, rhythm, imagery, syntax, lineation, personae, personification tone, voice, and repetition. Students will learn and write in form including, but not limited to, villanelles, prose poems, sonnets, sestinas, elegies, and odes. Class meetings will include both seminar and workshop discussions, discussion of entire books of contemporary poetry, and in-class writing.

Prerequisite: Engl 381 Intermediate Poetry Writing. Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

English 402-01: Advanced Fiction Writing - CRN 2082

Halina Duraj, M 2:30-5:20PM

This three-hour, once-a-week workshop emphasizes the fiction writing process (draft, workshop, revision) in an introduction to a graduate-style workshop. Students will write and submit for workshop two short stories and at least one revision. Students will also lead craft-focused class discussion of published stories and will prepare for a public reading of their own work. When time allows, we’ll also do in-class writing experiments and discuss the professional aspects of fiction writing, including publication, the pros and cons of M.F.A programs, the M.F.A. application process, and writing outside of the academy.

Prerequisite: Engl 382 Intermediate Fiction Writing. Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

English 403-01: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing - CRN 2083

Bradley Melekian, W 2:30-5:20pm

In this Advanced Nonfiction Writing course, students will generate works of creative nonfiction, ranging from the memoir to the personal essay to nonfiction feature writing. We will build on the techniques explored in the prerequisite course, Intermediate Nonfiction, and investigate the genre of narrative nonfiction—that is, nonfiction subjects written with fictional techniques. We will approach this course with the understanding that good writing is the culmination of serious thinking, heartfelt conviction, diligent work and a commitment to rewriting, reshaping, rethinking. Our understanding will further be that learning to write seriously, originally and creatively—which must be the goal of every student enrolled in this course—is an instruction in process. To that end, students will read landmark works of nonfiction from writers like Baldwin, Didion, McPhee, Mailer, Capote, Wolfe, Talese, Dillard and others to explore the ways in which the genre has developed and changed, and to consider how the best nonfiction writing goes beyond factual reporting to access truths about the human experience. Students will be expected to generate original writing each week, to read and critique the work of their classmates, to read and discuss exemplary works of the genre, to workshop (read aloud) their work and to consider the artful pairing of factual experience with creative writing. Instructor approval is required for this course.

Prerequisite: Engl 383 Intermediate Creative Nonfiction Writing. Counts as an upper-division elective in both the old and new major.

English 410-01: Advanced Writing in the English Major - CRN 2124

Sr. Mary Hotz, MWF 11:15AM-12:10PM

Formerly English "W" course.

We will explore the literary history of the Victorian era as an expression of (and participant in) broader political, cultural, and intellectual developments of this crucial period. Drawing on readings from a wide range of forms, genres and disciplines, we will examine several quintessentially Victorian issues and describe the ways these issues make themselves felt within literary texts. In particular, the relationship of Victorian culture to social relations will be a primary focus for the course. In addition, we will analyze and write about Victorian literature through a variety of aesthetic, ideological and theoretical approaches. Analyses of literary criticism invite students both to formulate and assess the arguments of others and to present their own questions and answers about the literature under discussion.  This is also an Advanced Writing course, fulfilling your Core requirement (and required for all English majors). We will be working on the process of writing an advanced literary essay. This involves developing organizational skills and research skills, as well as engaging with Victorian literature through criticism.

English 410 counts for the departmental Advanced Writing requirement in both the old and new majors as well as for Advanced Writing in the Core. Minors and Humanities majors are welcome. CADW

English 492: Southeast San Diego Tutoring Program

Timothy Randell

This is a ten-week course/internship during which you will tutor children in a local elementary or middle school in basic reading, writing, and math (depending on your assigned teacher/class). You will work at the school to which you are assigned with a teacher who will structure your activities with the children. Each week you will write a short journal to reflect on your experiences concerning a specific element of the school, your pupils, and other experiences concerning lesson plans or the learning environment. You will turn in the journal assignments periodically throughout the semester (not once a week or all at once at the end of the semester) to ensure accurate, unhurried, and thoughtful reflection. Tutors may commit to 3, 6, or 9 hours of tutoring per week (for 1, 2, or 3 academic credits per semester, respectively), and the course may be taken more than once (as often as tutors wish) to accommodate academic needs and time schedules.

The course counts for English elective credit. Lower Division students register for English 292, and Upper Division students register for English 492 (formerly ENGL 298 & 498)

English 493: Writing Center Tutors

Deborah Sundmacher

Theory and practice for Writing Center tutors. Consent of Writing Center director required.
Instructor Approval required.

English 496-01 Alcalá Review - CRN 2125

Halina Duraj

Reserved for active members of the editorial staff of the Alcalá Review only, this course serves as a practicum in literary magazine editing, concentrating on the strategies, activities, and procedures associated with all facets of managing, planning, and publishing a literary periodical.
1-Unit Internship; Instructor Approval required.