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Architecture

Adriana Eloisa Cuellar

Lecturer, Architecture

Adriana Cuéllar ­is principal of CRO studio with her partner Marcel Sanchez, an architectural design practice with experimental urban research projects. She received her Bachelor of Architectur­e from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and holds a Masters in Design Studies from Harvard University Graduate School of Design where she won the Annual Award for Excellence in Housing Design for the architectural and urban proposals for Huixquilucan, México. She received the 2006-2007 Rome Prize Fellowship in Design by the American Academy in Rome, where she pursued her interest on the trajectory with her partner, and developed methodologies of sequential mapping that unveil textures of change and erosion in urban fabrics.

Education

M.DesS, Harvard University Graduate School of Design (2004)
B.Arch., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (2000)

2006-2007 Rome Prize Fellowship in Design, American Academy in Rome.

 

Scholarly and Creative Work

For several years Cuéllar participated in the design and investigation of housing projects and urban issues at the border region of Tijuana-San Diego with Estudio Teddy Cruz. Cuéllar’s most recent projects with her partner Marcel Sanchez pursue the relevance of urban/architectural boundaries, using singular pluralities such as patterns and geometries to redefine architectural engagements and urban re-contextualization. Anticipated design solutions responding to accelerated growth of cities often flatten the complexities of everyday living, leaving behind the multilayered connections of intensities needed in the experiential infrastructures of a place. Their project in Rome consisted in developing methods to visualize boundaries, variations and intensities of urban textures. It emphasized on the mundane, the mapping of paths to uncover the hidden qualities nurturing the everyday: trajectories that stitch and reconfigure the space of controlled perspective.

Teaching Interests

Between analogue and digital media, Cuéllar’s teaching interest has been to develop methodologies of design that stimulate students to visualize architectural projects in unpredictable outcomes, where emphasis on process intersect with contemporary issues that bridge architecture into various urban, landscape and cartographic readings. Her interest on the trajectory as an urban study has lead to co-direct a study abroad program in Rome for the New School of Architecture and Design that focuses in bringing new methods of visualization to uncover more specific studies on the baroque and its geometries as tools to sense and capture the structures of the everyday.