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Koonyong Kim, PhD

Assistant Professor

Koonyong Kim earned his PhD from Duke University in 2010. Before coming to USD, he was a James B. Duke Fellow and Research Associate at the Institute for Critical Theory at Duke and Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of South Florida. His research and teaching focus on contemporary American literature, Asian American literature, critical theory, new media and cultural studies, architecture, musicology, and aesthetics.

Education

Ph.D., Duke University
M.A., Duke University
M.A., Yonsei University
B.A., Yonsei University

Scholarly and Creative Work

Kim has published on postmodern global culture, new media, musicology, Hegel, poststructuralism, and the Frankfurt School. He has also translated Fredric Jameson’s and Michael Hardt’s writings into Korean. Kim’s current book project, entitled “Across the Global Pacific: Mapping Contemporary Social Space and Transnational Cultural Forms,” is a critical intervention into the emerging field of Transpacific Studies, and reconfigures US literature and culture from global and transnational perspectives. Bringing together a wide array of innovative forms from American, Asian American, and East Asian literatures and cultures, Kim illustrates the ways in which transnational cultural exchange within and across the Pacific has played a shaping role in the inception and evolution of new global cultural forms and media, including, most notably, cyberpunk, electronic and digital literature, the transnational urban narrative, video art, cinematographic writing, postmodern architecture, anime, and online computer gaming.

Teaching Interests

Kim teaches a broad range of courses on American literature, Asian and Asian American literature, global social space, transnational new media, and cultural studies. Some of his most recent courses include “Across the Global Pacific: Postmodern America and Digital Asia,” “Performing Globality in Asian/American Literature,” “New Storytelling: Learning from Cyborgs,” “Reading Food and Asian American Literature,” and “Animagination: Anime, Image, Nation.”