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7.29.15

Financial Planning -- Other experts in nonprofit governance share that view.

"It's very unchecked," Miranda Perry Fleischer, a professor at the University of San Diego law school, says of nonprofit power. "It can be very hard for courts to intervene." (Full Story)

7.29.15

Telemundo 33 -- La profesora de historia de la Universidad de San Diego (USD), Iris Engstrand, recordó que el explorador portugués Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo logró levantar trece barcos en un periodo de cinco años.

“Él no tenía herramientas que tenemos ahora, no sé como podía hacerlo”, comentó.

“No tenía a la Guardia Costera mirando todas las cosas, solamente los nativos de San Salvador y Guatemala podían ayudarle”, agregó. (Full Story)

7.29.15

The Courier-Journal -- “It was a huge tactical blunder ...” said Len Simon, who has taught sports law at Duke, USC and the University of San Diego. “Anything was better than destroying the phone.” (Full Story)

7.28.15

Business Insider -- Students at these schools are three times more likely to drop out than their counterparts at American Bar Association (ABA) accredited law schools in the state.

“They are failure factories,” Robert Fellmeth, the Price Professor of Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego School of Law, told the Times. “They’re selling false hope to people who are willing to put everything out there for a chance to be a lawyer.” (Full Story)

7.28.15

Times of San Diego -- Everard Meade is the Director of the University of San Diego Trans-Border Institute

The assertion that the alleged murderer, Francisco López Sánchez, had committed “seven felonies” is misleading at best. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, better known as ICE, describes him as a “repeat felon” because he committed offenses that count as “aggravated felonies” for the purposes of U.S. immigration law, a category which includes misdemeanors under criminal law. (Full Story)

7.27.15

U-T San Diego -- “Most people think density is good, as long as it’s in somebody else’s neighborhood,” said Alan Gin, economist at University of San Diego. (Full Story)

7.27.15

MIT Technology Review -- In schools across the United States, chalk and textbooks are disappearing. In their place are tablets and laptops. This technological transformation is only just beginning, but it stands to reshape the ways teachers teach and students learn. In 2015, school systems will spend an estimated $522 million on tablets and readers, and $4.7 billion on IT overall. “Districts are trying to be very, very thoughtful about how they do this,” says Scott Himelstein, executive director of the University of San Diego’s Institute for Entrepreneurship in Education. “Obviously they don’t want to be in a situation like LAUSD.” (Full Story)

7.27.15

Los Angeles Times -- Robert Fellmeth, a law professor at the University of San Diego and executive director of the Center for Public Interest Law and the Children's Advocacy Institute, hailed the ruling as consistent with voters' intent. Nothing in the campaign for or against the measure suggested it was for adults only, he said.

"Under what rationale do we select out a 15-year-old for a more condemnatory consequence than a 32-year-old?" Fellmeth said. (Full Story)

7.27.15

The Motley Fool -- But are we really in store for a collapse of the housing market? Only in certain parts of the country, says a new study conducted by real estate experts Norm Miller, Hahn Chair of Real Estate Finance in the School of Business Administration's Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate at the University of San Diego (USD), Michael Sklarz, president of Collateral Analytics and Jim Follain, senior vice president for research and development at Collateral Analytics. (Full Story)

7.25.15

U-T San Diego -- As this happens, the U.S. will likely see a shift in the demographics of its unauthorized population, with fewer people coming for jobs and more people fleeing desperate, violent situations in their native countries, said Ev Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. The country’s recent influx of Central American unauthorized immigrants is an example of that, he said.

“What I think we’re going to see with the undocumented population is we’re going to see more people coming for complicated issues,” Meade said. “I think it’s changing the profile a little bit.” (Full Story)

7.24.15

PBS Newshour -- Robert Muth is a former officer in the Marine Corps. He runs a legal clinic for veterans at the University of San Diego.

ROBERT MUTH, University of San Diego: It looks like you have a corporate entity buying access to look like the preferred or the selected educational provider for the veterans or soon-to-be veterans at a base. (Full Story)

7.22.15

Bloomberg Business -- The “modest move” by the Internal Revenue Service would stop some of the most abusive maneuvers by private-equity firms, said Victor Fleischer, a tax law professor at the University of San Diego.

“The regulations strike me as more taxpayer-favorable than I would have expected,” he said. “The regulations try to accommodate some arrangements that are common in the industry and that in my view ought to be treated as payments for services,” taxed as ordinary income. (Full Story)

7.22.15

U-T San Diego -- Everard Meade is the Director of the University of San Diego Trans-Border Institute

If Mexico had extradited Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera to the United States he would not likely be at large. Nor, however, would it have made a dent in the drug war, or the mythical status of its charismatic leaders.

Containing larger-than-life figures like El Chapo will remain an illusion so long as policymakers on both sides of the border use high-profile arrests to mask an overwhelming reality of violence and corruption, rather than addressing it head on. (Full Story)

7.20.15

El Universal -- “Las autoridades estadounidenses han exagerado el daño causado por este llamado enemigo público número uno aquí y este tipo de declaraciones, para mí, insulta a los que han sufrido lo peor de la violencia de la guerra del narco, que claramente están en México”, dice Ev Meade, director del Trans-Border Institute de la Universidad de San Diego. (Full Story)

7.18.15

U-T San Diego -- David Shirk is an Associate Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the University of San Diego and the Director of the Justice in Mexico Project

The capture of Joaquín “El Chapo (Shorty)” Guzmán in February 2014 was lauded at home and abroad as one of the most important accomplishments of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, who restored Mexico’s longtime ruling party to power after a 12-year hiatus. However, on July 11, 2015, Guzman escaped from Mexico’s top maximum-security prison.

Now, one of Peña Nieto’s greatest feats is widely seen as his greatest failure, and a possible setback to U.S.-Mexico relations. Since Guzmán’s escape through a 1.5-kilometer ventilated tunnel, pundits are debating who is to blame and what comes next in the fight against Mexican organized crime. (Full Story)

7.17.15

NBC News -- There is another problem: biological systems don't always scale up or down. The amount of oxygen we take from the air, the food we digest, the heat we give off; these all depend on the surface area of our organs and the mass of our bodies.

"It's not as simple as saying, 'Oh, everything will shrink down and stay proportional,'" Michel Boudrias, biomechanics expert and chair of the environmental and ocean sciences department at the University of San Diego, told NBC News. (Full Story)

7.17.15

U-T San Diego -- “It’s a pretty good combination of high paying sectors,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “It’s a good situation when the high paying sectors are leading the way. That should help the other sectors of the economy.” (Full Story)

7.17.15

GlobeSt.com -- Despite speculation to the contrary, Norm Miller, PhD, Ernest W. Hahn Chair of Real Estate Finance in the School of Business Administration’s Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate at the University of San Diego, says we are far from bubble territory on a national or metropolitan level. While US home prices are increasing on a national level more than expected, suggesting a definitive recovery from the recession and causing some experts to speculate mistakenly that another bubble is in our midst, Miller refutes this. (Full Story)

7.17.15

On Point -- Interview with Trans-Border Institute Director Everard Meade (Full Story)

7.16.15

KOGO News Radio -- Norm Miller spoke with KOGO News Radio on the housing market (Full Story)

7.16.15

Bigger Pockets -- But are we really in store for a collapse of the housing market? Only in certain parts of the country, says a new study conducted by real estate experts Norm Miller, Hahn Chair of Real Estate Finance in the School of Business Administration’s Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate at the University of San Diego (USD), Michael Sklarz, president of Collateral Analytics and Jim Follain, senior vice president for research and development at Collateral Analytics.

Pooling new research from almost 400,000 neighborhoods and 20,000 surrounding zip codes across the country, Miller and his co-authors detail their findings in a white paper called, “Is a New Home Price Bubble Forming?” In the study, they focus on defining the characteristics of a “bubble” and finding economically sound ways of evaluating the intrinsic value of homes so as to take a more accurate look at where we are in terms of market sustainability. (Full Story)

7.15.15

BLKDMNDS -- “He’s different from some who might want to be feared but aren’t trying to build a territorial dynasty,” says Everard Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. A businessman with a military mindset, El Mencho has focused on tightening and lengthening his supply chain, and demolishing competitors or anyone else who might get in the way. (Full Story)

7.15.15

U.S. News and World Report -- "Express congressional approval seems very unlikely," says Michael Ramsey of the University of San Diego School of Law, who disagrees the review act essentially ratified the deal. "Assuming Congress won't expressly approve, the deal can only be a nonbinding one, which this president can implement to the extent of his statutory and constitutional authority [and] future presidents can refuse to follow."

But even if the deal is a nonbinding executive agreement under domestic law, Ramsey says, it's possible that it's binding under international law.

"You can't claim domestic invalidity to get out of an international deal," he says. The key to evaluating if the deal is binding internationally, he says, is the intent of parties, which can partially be gleaned by the strength of written commitments. (Full Story)

7.15.15

National Post -- Extraditions to the United States had dropped to 54 in 2013 from 115 in 2012, according to U.S. government figures compiled by Justice in Mexico, a research project at the University of San Diego in California. The joint operations center in Mexico City, where officials from both countries are supposed to work together, often included no one from the Mexican government, or just a few people, with dozens of cubicles left empty in a tall glass tower. (Full Story)

7.15.15

San Diego 6 News -- Some parts of San Diego's real estate market are entering bubble territory and could pop in the next recession, University of San Diego real estate expert Norm Miller said Wednesday.

The trend in San Diego and a few other cities where the market is being driven by high valuations of tech stocks counters what's happening around the country, which is far from being in a bubble, said Miller, the Hahn Chairman of Real Estate Finance in the School of Business Administration's Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate. (Full Story)

7.14.15

KPBS -- Alan Segui, a political science professor and international studies professor at the University of San Diego, said some Filipino-Americans tend to vote Republican because of their military connection. After World War II and until 1992, Filipinos could get American citizenship by enlisting in the U.S. military, typically the U.S. Navy. But the Filipino-American community today is slightly more Democratic than Republican, he said. (Full Story)

7.14.15

Yahoo! News -- All this chaos and change has given El Mencho his chance: He’s shown a foxlike dexterity for adapting to circumstance, whether it’s switching allegiances or moving to meth from heroin — all while going unseen. Indeed, while he hasn’t gotten much press outside Mexico, El Mencho and his Cártel de Jalisco Nueva Generación have expanded territory from coast to coast, becoming the most global of all the Mexican suppliers. “He’s different from some who might want to be feared but aren’t trying to build a territorial dynasty,” says Everard Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

7.14.15

The Washington Post -- That logic is simple: Social media carries with it certain risks and some doubt that the 60-year-old Guzmán, known for his caution, would use it personally. David Shirk, an associate professor at the University of San Diego and the director of the Justice in Mexico project, points out that it would be "foolish" for any high-ranking cartel member to post to social media personally, and that generally it is only "younger, inexperienced individuals" who use the networks like Twitter so flagrantly. (Full Story)

7.14.15

OZY -- The Mexican drug trade has long existed, of course, but the past 15 years have seen a deadly shift in the balance of power. When Mexico had a one-party political system, the government could more easily set the terms with cartels, Meade says. Typically, the exchange went like this: The government promised to leave cartels alone so long as its agents got their cut. But in 2000, the political system opened up to multiple parties, giving cartels more leverage. (Full Story)

7.14.15

MSN News -- Instead of the government taxing the drug runners, it’s now the other way around: “The cartels set the terms,” says Meade. And their use of violence has shifted too. Murder is no longer a way of shielding the black market from public view; it’s become a tool “to terrify local governments and people into submission,” Meade says. According to numbers from Human Rights Watch, about 60,000 people were murdered in Mexico between 2006 and 2012, a death toll El Mencho is only accelerating. (Full Story)

7.14.15

KPBS -- Ev Meade, the director of University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute, said people in Mexico are now snickering over Guzman's latest escape.

"It's an almost ironic celebration of the fact that he showed the ineffectiveness of the Mexican government once again," Meade said. "But that very quickly turns to outrage and indignation. People feel like this is a national shame, that a country that has great hopes for itself has not achieved what it wants to achieve regarding citizenship and democracy." (Full Story)

7.13.15

Fox 5 -- When “El Chapo Guzmán” escaped from prison on Saturday the Trans-Border Institute, based at University of San Diego took notice.

The USD has programs and personnel working in Culiacán, Sinaloa where Guzmán’s drug cartel is based.

“We have close partnerships with a number of organizations in Culiacán. We teach there,” said Dr. Everard Meade, Director of the Trans-Border Institute. “We heard from them yesterday. There’s heart-felt concern, worry and a lot of fear because people don’t know if city is going to turn into war zone.” (Full Story)

7.10.15

KUSI -- KUSI News speaks with Winnie Callahan, director of USD's Center for Cyber Security Engineering and Technology (Full Story)

7.09.15

CBS News -- Yet even in such a rigidly controlled environment, from what types of clothes prisoners wear to when they wake up in the morning, inmates are finding ways to meet their needs through entrepreneurial ventures, according to a new study from Ronald Paul Hill and Michael Capella of the Villanova School of Business and Justine Rapp at the University of San Diego and published in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing. (Full Story)

7.09.15

U-T San Diego -- “It helps and it hurts,” said Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego. “It helps because we can ship stuff up there but why locate down here anyway if you’re just going to ship out of LA?” (Full Story)

7.09.15

Sacramento Business Journal -- California requires active attorneys to take 25 hours of legal education classes every three years. Some states require 45. “Twenty-five hours is pathetic,” said Julie D’Angelo-Fellmeth, administrative director of the University of San Diego’s Center for Public Interest Law. There’s no requirement that includes a lawyer's field of practice. (Full Story)

7.08.15

U-T San Diego -- “The cost of living is so high here, particularly rents,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “Americans have among the lowest savings rates in the world, because we’re a consumer society.” (Full Story)

7.08.15

KUSI -- KUSI spoke with University of San Diego Economist Alan Gin, who said the Chinese stock market is experiencing these huge swings because the bubble of over-inflated stock prices is finally bursting. (Full Story)

7.07.15

U-T San Diego -- Katie Ferraro, a registered dietitian and assistant clinical professor at the University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing and Health Sciences, said many people mistakenly use the terms “overweight” and “obese” interchangeably, but they are two distinct categories.

She said a person is overweight if they have a Body Mass Index (BMI) — a measure of body fat based on height and weight — of 25 to 29.9. Those with a BMI of 30 or higher are considered obese. On average, a BMI of 30 translates into a person being about 40 pounds overweight. (Full Story)

7.07.15

Science Daily -- "The men at Gramercy quickly come to understand that the formal system of exchange, from public provision of goods and services to the commissary, is primarily responsive to needs of third parties such as guards, politicians, voters, and suppliers. The needs and desires of the incarcerated men themselves are often neglected, and so the prisoners themselves take entrepreneurial steps to meet them," write the authors Ronald Paul Hill (Villanova Business School), Justine Rapp (University of San Diego), and Michael L. Capella (Villanova Business School). (Full Story)

7.06.15

KUSI -- KUSI News speaks with Alan Gin, Associate Professor of Economics (Full Story)

7.02.15

Bloomberg Business -- If Alsup sides with the workers, Apple will probably settle the case rather than risk a trial, said Orly Lobel, a law professor at University of San Diego who specializes in labor and employment issues.

“I don’t see it as a ‘threat’ to Apple in the larger scheme of things but certainly if class is certified it would likely end in some settlement and Apple would have to change some of its calculations of wage and hour pay to certain categories of employees,” Lobel said. (Full Story)

7.01.15

Fortune -- That’s how it should be, argues Orly Lobel, a professor at the University of San Diego School of Law. “If there was ever a competitive market,” she says, “it should be applied to our greatest resource today: talent.” (Full Story)

6.30.15

KPBS -- The index stood at 139.7 in May, the highest mark since December 2006, according to data supplied by Professor Alan Gin.

The monthly hike was the 12th in a row for the index, but the size of the increase — 0.5 percent — was the smallest since last October, Gin said.

He said it was also the first time since August of last year that two components fell in the same month. Consumer confidence dropped by a small amount, while stocks in San Diego-based companies were lower, despite gains in the overall markets. (Full Story)

6.30.15

The Washington Post -- Victor Fleischer, a professor of tax law at the University of San Diego, said releasing only some tax information portrays a mixed message about how Bush earned his fortune.

“If you got rich from starting a business and it is successful, that is to be commended,” Fleischer said. “If you got rich because your parents were rich and gave you access to economic opportunities others didn’t have, or you got rich from trading on your political access, that is troubling.” (Full Story)

6.26.15

U-T San Diego -- Q: Must taxes be raised to fund the ever-increasing bill for infrastructure and deferred maintenance throughout the country?

ALAN GIN, UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO

Answer: YES

The problem of deferred maintenance keeps getting worse the longer it is put off. For some items such a road and bridge repair, there is a safety issue at play. On top of that maintenance, there are infrastructure needs such as expansion of the San Diego convention Center that are important to the economy. Some would argue that cuts should be made elsewhere to fund these expenditures, but austerity measures at the state and local level have already slowed the recovery from the Great Recession. (Full Story)

6.24.15

U-T San Diego -- “I think that the Great Recession has caused a change in people’s attitudes,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “The American dream of home ownership has declined.” (Full Story)

6.19.15

U-T San Diego -- “People are getting more money and they’re more stable in their job situation,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “Rather than going out and buying a big-ticket item, one of the first things people do is eat out more.” (Full Story)

6.18.15

GlobeSt.com -- Vivek Sah, University of San Diego

As far as green REITs go, technically there are no green REITs—you have to self-declare as a green REIT. You have to show that you’re buying buildings that are LEED certified or seeking LEED certification. There are some green REITs that have shown better operating performance, but it’s hard to prove. If someone buys an office building that’s LEED certified and they get higher rents, they can’t prove that they’re doing better because the building is green. The same is true for sales—some green buildings sell for higher, and some don’t. Until it becomes a law that every building has to be LEED certified, builders may not have the inventive to put more dollars into construction costs because they might not see the ROI. Still, there’s a big trend in that direction, but there’s a lack of data on the performance of these buildings. (Full Story)

6.18.15

U-T San Diego -- "What you get paid reflects your own unique circumstances," said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. "The data gives a benchmark. You can use it as a guidepost in terms of determining what you might want to ask and present it as data that supports it." (Full Story)

6.17.15

San Diego Newscape -- "The Advanced Certificate in Intellectual Property and Regulatory Affairs program offers an opportunity for midlevel managers who oversee intellectual property and government regulatory processes and procedures in life science companies to become better trained in both matters," said Stephen C. Ferruolo, dean of USD School of Law. (Full Story)

6.16.15

ABC 30 News -- "What a way to honor Tony," said USD coach Rich Hill, who played with Gwynn in college. "I think this is going to be the best college baseball tournament in the country. Teams are already lining up to play in it." (Full Story)

6.12.15

U-T San Diego -- Q: Do you agree with the International Monetary Fund that the Fed should wait until next year before increasing interest rates?

ALAN GIN, UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO

Answer: YES

Other than the dip in first quarter GDP, most national economic indicators are looking good. The labor market is particularly strong, with 280,000 jobs added in May and good wage growth. So the U.S. economy may not need much more stimulus, but there are problems internationally in Europe and in China. Keeping the U.S. economy strong will help the global economy and benefit U.S. workers. Inflation is a concern, but the core rate of inflation is still under control at 1.8 percent through April. (Full Story)

6.10.15

Times of San Diego -- Pat Libby, a University of San Diego professor and expert on charities, said nonprofit services like day care, private schools and cultural institutions help businesses support and attract employees.

“We can’t take credit for the weather, but the fabulous things that nonprofits do enable business to do what it does,” she said.

Libby spoke at the 97th annual meeting of Jewish Family Service of San Diego, an agency which provides financial, social, emotional, physical and spiritual support to individuals of all religions in San Diego and the Coachella Valley. (Full Story)

6.05.15

Business.com Media, Inc. -- " ... Colleges and universities have created salary-negotiating workshops to teach soon-to-be female graduates how to negotiate effectively. “Students exiting college need to have an understanding of how the wage gap affects them personally,” Erin Lovette-Coyler, director of the University of San Diego’s Women’s Center told UT San Diego." (Full Story)

6.05.15

Sydney Davis lives life passionately. Whether she’s studying for her biology classes, observing giraffes in the African bush for a research thesis or catching leopard sharks for an internship, Davis approaches every project with spirit and vigor.

But Davis’s biggest passion is undeniable: animals. As a biology major and chemistry minor, Davis spent much of her undergraduate career working directly with all types of creatures. In addition to a hands-on research internship with Scripps Institute of Oceanography in which Davis caught, tagged and tracked sharks, she also spent four months in Kenya on a Wildlife Management Course through one of USD’s renowned study abroad programs. In fact, the program helped Davis discover new passions.

“I got to be really close with the wildlife there, and I learned about the issues between humans and wild animals. I became very passionate about conservation, but I still wanted to become a veterinarian. My advisor [from the program] is a veterinarian for elephants and he said, ‘It’s possible to do both.’ So that’s what I plan on doing.”

6.05.15

Sydney Davis lives life passionately. Whether she’s studying for her biology classes, observing giraffes in the African bush for a research thesis or catching leopard sharks for an internship, Davis approaches every project with spirit and vigor.

But Davis’s biggest passion is undeniable: animals. As a biology major and chemistry minor, Davis spent much of her undergraduate career working directly with all types of creatures. In addition to a hands-on research internship with Scripps Institute of Oceanography in which Davis caught, tagged and tracked sharks, she also spent four months in Kenya on a Wildlife Management Course through one of USD’s renowned study abroad programs. In fact, the program helped Davis discover new passions.

“I got to be really close with the wildlife there, and I learned about the issues between humans and wild animals. I became very passionate about conservation, but I still wanted to become a veterinarian. My advisor [from the program] is a veterinarian for elephants and he said, ‘It’s possible to do both.’ So that’s what I plan on doing.”

6.04.15

Reason.Com -- But the problem with the Paulsen-Whelan approach, as University of San Diego law professor Michael Ramsey points out, is that it would render "every branch a law unto itself, which seems inconsistent with the framers' idea of a written Constitution to check the branches' tendency to wrongfully augment their power and of an independent judiciary to keep the political branches within their constitutional boundaries." (Full Story)

6.02.15

Fortune -- “Companies here go after competitors’ talent, and I’ve been arguing that’s a good thing since it allows knowledge to flow,” says Orly Lobel, a University of San Diego law professor.

She praises California’s ban on non-compete clauses, saying her research shows how states that limit or forbid such clauses are more innovative than those that enforce them. (Full Story)

5.28.15

WPR -- According to Justice in Mexico, a research program based at the University of San Diego, between 15,649 and 20,670 homicides took place in Mexico in 2014. Although this marks a decrease of 9 to 15 percent from 2013, the historic low of 8,867 killings in 2007 remains distant. Of course, any figure on violence in Mexico should also be taken with precaution: In 2013, Mexico’s National Institute for Statistics and Geography estimated that 87 percent of crimes were in fact not reported, and 92 percent were not investigated. Violence has significantly decreased in cities like Acapulco, Chihuahua and Ciudad Juarez, but other states, like Jalisco, have seen the reverse. (Full Story)

5.27.15

KPBS -- Wednesday on Midday Edition, Ev Meade, director of the University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute and Lilia Velasquez, an immigration and naturalization attorney and an adjunct professor, at California Western School of Law review details of the ruling and how people who were eligible for DAPA in San Diego County will be affected. (Full Story)

5.26.15

KPBS -- San Diego County's unemployment rate hit a near eight-year low of 4.8 percent, according to the California Economic Development Department.

The county's rate is less than the state's unemployment rate, which is 6.1 percent. The government statistics don't count the individuals who have stopped looking for work, but only those actively seeking a job.

Alan Gin, professor of economics at the University of San Diego and author of USD's Index of Leading Economic Indicators, discusses the job market on Monday's KPBS Midday Edition. He'll explain what the latest unemployment figures really mean for San Diego's economy. (Full Story)

5.25.15

KPBS -- Iris Engstrand, a University of San Diego history professor, has written about San Diego during its war years and recalls experiencing the war firsthand as a small child. (Full Story)

5.22.15

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said he considers growth in the construction sector and the professional, scientific and technical services as key to continued success in the economy. Construction jobs create a ripple effect, leading to more consumer spending and the hiring of contractors. Meanwhile, the professional, scientific and technical services include the high-paid researchers, lawyers and architects, who spend more money in the economy. (Full Story)

5.19.15

Men's Health -- We’re big proponents of diversifying the qualities that define good health. Healthy men are fit and free of harmful diseases, of course, but they’re also good husbands, boyfriends, fathers, bosses, and employees. Healthy men also manage their personal finances in healthy ways. And over the years, Men’s Health has shared essential advice from the top financial experts in the field to help you maximise your money. (Full Story)

5.15.15

U-T San Diego -- Q: Are you concerned that consumer spending is not increasing at the same healthy rate as job growth?

ALAN GIN, UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO

Answer: YES

Between 1947 and the Great Recession, consumption contributed 2.22 percent to annual GDP growth of 3.51 percent. During the recovery, consumption’s contribution fell to 1.57 percent and this slowed GDP growth to only 2.25 percent. The worsening of income inequality in this country is a big reason for the slump. (Full Story)

5.14.15

Wallet Hub -- The struggles endured in recent years by America’s young people pale in comparison to those suffered by their peers in Spain and Greece, where youth unemployment in excess of 50 percent has spawned great social unrest. Still, finding a job in the U.S. — let alone laying the foundation for a long and prosperous career — is far from simple.

But there’s reason for optimism among the graduating class of 2015 and the scores of young people so disillusioned with the job market that they’ve given up their search for employment. Not only do more employers plan to hire recent college grads in 2015, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, but hiring in general is also on the rise. (Full Story)

5.14.15

Bisnow -- Four months after taking over as executive director at the University of San Diego's Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate, Stath Karras noticed something very important: The Millennial mind-set is very real.

“It's a demographic that is getting married later in life. They're having children later in life. They're highly technologically advanced,” Stath tells us. And to add to that descriptive mix, when it comes to workplace expectations, Millennials are much more team-oriented and collaborative. That goes for USD's students as well. (Full Story)

5.07.15

The Daily Transcript -- About $2.5 billion worth of real estate investments could be raised via crowdfunding this year, industry reports say, a great increase from last year’s paltry $1 billion.

“Extrapolate that out a few more years and it might actually be something really significant,” said Professor Norm Miller of Burnhan-Moores Center for Real Estate. “More than that, it might be significant to smaller investors.”

Three professionals in the crowdfunding arena spoke on a panel moderated by Miller on Wednesday morning as part of a Burnham-Moores Center breakfast lecture series.

The event was at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice Theatre, on the University of San Diego campus. (Full Story)

5.06.15

Fox News Latino -- “This goes up against and threatens the message that Mexico is trying to push – that it is a vibrant economic power,” David Shirk, professor of international relations at the University of San Diego and an investigator at the research group Justice in Mexico, told FNL.

Shirk added that this incursion into a high-profile urban area by a drug cartel is something that the Mexican government has dealt with before. (Full Story)

4.30.15

USA Today -- Murders in Mexico fell for a third straight year in 2014 — the most pronounced declines occurring along the U.S. border — a sign the country is slowly stabilizing after gruesome drug wars.

There were 15,649 people murdered in Mexico in 2014, a 13.8% reduction from the previous year and down from a peak of 22,480 in 2011, according to a report set to be released Thursday by the University of San Diego's Justice in Mexico Project. (Full Story)

4.30.15

KPBS -- The early 20th century was a turning point for women’s rights in America. The right to vote was secured nationwide in 1920. Many states in the West got there sooner. The territory of Wyoming allowed women to vote in 1869. California had women’s suffrage in 1911.

But University of San Diego historian Molly McClain said as much as they wanted political rights, women of the time also wanted some recognition for their place in history and the contributions they had made. (Full Story)

4.30.15

U-T San Diego -- Entitled “Drug Violence in Mexico,” the report has been produced annually since 2010 by the University of San Diego’s Justice in Mexico project, and examines trends across the country.

While Mexico’s homicide numbers in 2014 dropped anywhere from 9 to 15 percent, depending on the source, “things are improving slowly and haltingly,” said David Shirk, a USD political science professor and one of the authors of the report. “It’s certainly not time for breaking out the Champagne,” he said. (Full Story)

4.28.15

KPBS -- The labor market is driving the increase in the index, according to University of San Diego economist Alan Gin.

Jobless claims declined and help wanted advertising was up, Gin said. And there was positive movement in all the local categories.

"All six (local) components were up," Gin said. "That's the third month in a row where that's happened. That hasn't happened before in the history of the index. So it looks like the local economy is firing on all cylinders at this point." (Full Story)

4.27.15

ABC 10 News -- University of San Diego Kroc Institute has helped Nepal since Civil War. (Full Story)

4.25.15

CBS News 8 -- Richard Allyn speaks with Zahra Ismail, Program Officer with the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace & Justice (Full Story)

4.21.15

U-T San Diego -- Still, said Katie Ferraro, a registered dietitian and assistant clinical professor at the University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, consumers need to remember that eating fresh, local food does not automatically equal health.

“Organic junk food is still junk food,” she said. “Just because a food was sourced locally — or recently — does not ensure its health. If a food is laden with too many calories, excessive salt or saturated fats, regardless of its origin, it can be considered unhealthful.” (Full Story)

4.20.15

The Daily Illini -- The plot is clear “even if you don’t understand French. There’s so much going on there visually,” said Eric Pierson, associate professor at the University of San Diego and Ebertfest panelist during the movie’s Q and A session. (Full Story)

4.19.15

U-T San Diego -- The peninsula in San Diego Bay known as Ballast Point comes from Fort Guijarros, a small Spanish garrison on Point Loma that guarded the bay. Guijarros translates to “ballast,” said Iris Engstrand, a history professor at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

4.17.15

Standard-Times -- Others suggested that Google not risk a drawn-out battle.

“I would absolutely settle,” said Robert Fellmeth, executive director of the Center for Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego. “The European Union is a big market and the EU likely is going to win in the courts” if Google appeals an adverse judgment. The company has to “nip this in the bud.” (Full Story)

4.14.15

U-T San Diego -- “He’s got solid credentials as an academic intellectual,” said Mary Lyons, the University of San Diego’s president, “but also great pastoral experience and tremendous compassion for the underserved.” (Full Story)

4.13.15

KPBS -- A recent survey of Tijuana police officers shows more than 80 percent of them acknowledge some level of corruption in their department.

The University of San Diego’s Justice in Mexico project shared the survey's findings on Friday, a month after releasing the results in Mexico.

Project researchers teamed up with think tanks on both sides of the border to conduct what they say is the largest study ever done on the Tijuana Police Department. (Full Story)

4.13.15

U-T San Diego -- Numerous sources confirmed the schools have agreed to a one-year contract to play outdoors in early December at the downtown baseball stadium, in a similar configuration that hosted tennis’ Davis Cup last year and will seat up to 20,000. It will be SDSU’s second game in the elements in four years, having opened the 2012-13 season against Syracuse on the USS Midway aircraft carrier in San Diego Bay.

The Petco game is the brainchild of SDSU athletic director Jim Sterk, who figured if basketball could be played on a flight deck, why not on a warning track? (Full Story)

4.10.15

U-T San Diego -- Among the key findings: the need for clearer rules to determine promotions and allow the department’s most promising officers to move up the ranks.

“People don’t think they’re being promoted for their merit,” said David Shirk, a USD political science professor who heads the Justice in Mexico Project and is one of the study’s authors. “You’ve got to tell people what the rules are.” (Full Story)

4.03.15

Huffington Post -- Alberto Pulido, a professor of ethnic studies at the University of San Diego, spent six years studying the Penitente Brotherhood. He says intrusions from the outside world have haunted the Hermanos for decades.

"In history, they've always been portrayed as flagellants, as non-Christians, as immoral individuals," Pulido says. "It's time to recognize the fact that we need to see them in a different way." (Full Story)

3.24.15

Times of San Diego -- “The inspiration behind Insight was to be able to offer an easy tool for students to manage and prioritize their obligations, assignments and to-dos right on their smartphone as the need for the task occurs,” said Avi Badwal, senior director of enterprise technologies who led the development of the Insight App. “Real-time organization and management are what set this app apart.” (Full Story)

3.20.15

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said wages should start to increase more substantially when the unemployment rate falls below 5 percent, something he sees happening by the end of the year.

“The labor market will tighten up,” he said. “Employers will have more difficulty finding workers and so they’re going to have to offer higher wages to entice people to work there.” (Full Story)

3.19.15

Fox 11 -- About a dozen studies over the past 25 years have shown, in one way or another, that we, as sports fans, are inexorably drawn to the team with the odds stacked against it.

“It’s the prominent narrative in sports,” said Nadav Goldschmied of University of San Diego, who collaborated on one of the studies. (Full Story)

3.18.15

ABC News -- "It's the prominent narrative in sports," said Nadav Goldschmied of University of San Diego, who collaborated on one of the studies.

This penchant runs counter to almost everything else we're wired to think. Scientific studies show people want to be associated with success and that our self-esteem grows when we're part of the "in" crowd. Walk one well-dressed job candidate through the door, then follow him up with a schlub, and the studies show the majority of us favor the person who appears more attractive, almost regardless of their credentials.

But take that same dynamic into a sporting contest, where it's a scraggly No. 14 seed against a polished No. 3, and the perceptions change. (Full Story)

3.18.15

KPBS -- Carl Luna, a political science professor at Mesa College, will moderate the conference with keynote speaker Steven Dinkin, president of the National Conflict Resolution Center.

Luna said the key to civility is respect.

“As soon as respect breaks down the whole social context breaks down,” Luna told KPBS Midday Edition on Wednesday. “That’s the path we really (have) been slipping down that we need to reverse.” (Full Story)

3.17.15

U-T San Diego -- And when it comes to a beverage to wash down traditional Irish food, Katie Ferraro, a registered dietitian and assistant clinical professor of nutrition at the University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, said beer such as Guinness “is not nearly as bad for you as some people think.”

In fact, she said, at 4.2 percent, Guinness actually contains less alcohol than most beers, and its dark color doesn’t mean it’s high in calories.

“Because of its lower alcohol content, the calories in Guinness are less than you would think,” she said. “Twelve ounces has 125 calories, similar to that of many light domestic beers.” In fact, Schatzlein said, the darker the beer, the better. A dark Irish stout such as Guinness and Murphy’s contains antioxidants and flavonoids that may have heart-protective benefits. (Full Story)

3.16.15

Tech News World -- "The likely defense is that the ads were not in fact misleading to consumers -- that the ads were short but that the terms appeared in the contract [and] on the website -- though the FTC claims it wasn't up front on the website either," said Orly Lobel, a law professor at the University of San Diego.

"The judge will have to interpret what is 'deceptive and misleading' to an average consumer, and that is a ... case-by-case inquiry, depending on the norms of the industry and so forth," she told the E-Commerce Times. (Full Story)

3.16.15

U-T San Diego -- “Things aren’t as strong as we thought they were toward the end of last year,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

3.12.15

Tampa Bay Times -- "The problem I have (with Biden’s claim) is that I have no idea how anyone would figure out how many non-binding agreements there are, or indeed what even counts as a non-binding agreement," said Michael D. Ramsey, law professor at the University of San Diego. "The president and his diplomats are constantly making arrangements with foreign officials on many issues large and small, but most of these are not extensively negotiated or directed to important matters." (Full Story)

3.11.15

Tampa Bay Times -- While Congress has the power to violate international law -- and the ability of the international community to punish a violation is debatable -- "the real question, which I think both sides are missing, is whether overriding would violate international law," which requires compliance with binding agreements, said Michael D. Ramsey, a law professor at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

3.10.15

U-T San Diego -- “Fewer people losing their jobs and stronger hiring: It’s a really good combination,” said Alan Gin, a University of San Diego economist who produces a local index of leading indicators.

Gin expects the unemployment rate to fall below 5 percent sometime this year, a level that could create conditions necessary for sustainable wage gains as employers compete for scarce workers. San Diego hasn’t seen such conditions since the “golden age” of job creation from 1997 through 2000, when employers created close to 45,000 positions a year. (Full Story)

3.09.15

U-T San Diego -- When the debate heated up last year over whether to raise San Diego’s minimum wage, Alan Gin went out on a limb.

An economist at the University of San Diego’s School of Business Administration, Gin made his case for increasing the city’s base hourly rate at news conferences held by the Center on Policy Initiatives.

“It was something I just believed in,” said Gin, 58. “There might be some unhappiness with the stance I took in the business community, but there hasn’t been any sort of fallout or anything like that.” (Full Story)

3.08.15

U-T San Diego -- People are much less likely to pull the trigger when there is a high probability it will have significant negative consequences for themselves as well as their victims,” said David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego and head of the school’s Justice in Mexico project. “The low number of homicides prosecuted throughout Mexico, including Baja California and Tijuana, means that you can literally get away with murder.” (Full Story)

3.06.15

U-T San Diego -- "The rumors of California’s demise are greatly exaggerated here," said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. "The unemployment rate's coming down and the gap between California and the rest of the country is narrowing." (Full Story)

3.05.15

The Modesto Bee -- Pat Libby, director of the University of San Diego’s Institute for Nonprofit Education and Research, said she advocates that nonprofit organizations be transparent when facing a crisis. But she understands the Salvation Army’s position.

“Every time there is a scandal, it has a ripple effect on all nonprofits and jeopardizes charitable contributions and the public’s willingness to volunteer,” Libby said. “The most valuable asset a nonprofit owns is its reputation.” (Full Story)

3.05.15

Fox News Latino -- “The only thing he’s managed is to get the public attention away from the security program,” said Octavio Rodriguez, program coordinator of the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego. “He’s managed to get the executions out of the newspapers.” (Full Story)

3.02.15

U-T San Diego -- “He’s a very thoughtful, helpful, wonderful man,” said Mary Lyons, president of the University of San Diego, who once tried to recruit McElroy for the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies. “I’m very happy, very excited.” (Full Story)

3.01.15

U-T San Diego -- A soon-to-be released study that looks at the lives of Tijuana police officers and their interactions with civilians found that more than 80 percent of the officers surveyed said “there is some level of corruption on the force,” said David Shirk, a professor at University of San Diego, and one of the study’s authors. (Full Story)

2.28.15

U-T San Diego -- “(The exhibit) shows there was a sophisticated and really active professional artist core here, working in their own manner already,” said Cartwright, a professor at the University of San Diego. “And what’s exciting for me about this is there’s at least a century, if not more, of high-quality artistic practice here that merits attention. (Full Story)

2.24.15

KPBS -- The University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute kicks off it's 9th annual Border Film Week on Tuesday. The films range from the risks Mexican journalists take to report on the drug war to the consequences one Mexican town faced from mass migration of its residents.

Ev Meade, director at the institute, said the event gives people a new medium to explore complex issues like immigration.

"We have a mission to speak to the general public but also speak in a variety of different media," Meade told KPBS Midday Edition on Tuesday. "The films that we feature are mostly documentary films. It's creative but creative to a point — creative with a lot of facts." (Full Story)

2.22.15

Public Radio International -- While the Academy takes heat for this year's line-up, the diversity critique isn't new. According to an Associated Press survery, 86 non-whites have won Oscars since 1929, compared to 812 whites. Brian Hu, artistic director at the San Diego Asian Film Festival and adjunct faculty of media and film at the University of San Diego, says he wasn't surprised by the nominations. “I know better than to be disappointed. I’ve been jilted too long to be disappointed,” he says. (Full Story)

2.20.15

MSN News -- "The incident in Mamasapano has reignited anti-Moro sentiment while also increasing fear among the Moro community that the Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro will not be implemented,"? Jennifer Freeman, senior program officer for Women, Peace and Security of the Joan B. Froc Institute for Peace and Development based at the University of San Diego, which sponsored the dialogue, said. (Full Story)

2.16.15

The Atlanta Journal Constitution -- Under the terms of a truce with San Francisco, San Diego had to leave the word “international” out of the name of its expo.

“At first, it was a rivalry,” said Iris Engstrand, a professor of history at the University of San Diego and curator of “San Diego Invites the World: The 1915 Expo” at the San Diego History Center. “But then they both realized they were both going to have a fair, and they’d better cooperate.” (Full Story)

2.15.15

WGBH News -- “[T]here’s a lot of gamesmanship and strategy promoting buildings as LEED-certified,” said Norm Miller, a professor of real estate at the University of San Diego. Miller helped produce a 2011 study in 14 American cities that found that buildings advertising LEED certification bring an average of 7 percent higher rents than ones without the designation. (Full Story)

2.13.15

U-T San Diego -- Question: Do you deserve a raise?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

Businesses will have to start paying higher wages soon as the labor market is starting to tighten. (Full Story)

2.06.15

The New York Times -- Companies’ offshore cash holdings are a tempting target for American tax writers, as President Obama’s proposal this week to tax deferred offshore earnings proves. Those same offshore earnings may attract foreign buyers as well. (Full Story)

2.03.15

Fox 5 -- While San Diego may not be the most expensive city to own a home, it is considered the least affordable.

According to a study conducted by Realtor.com, San Diego ranks as the most unaffordable city in terms of real estate in relation to income.

“In more than 90 percent of the zip codes, less than half of the people can afford to buy homes. That’s the worst in any metropolitan area in the U.S.,” said University of San Diego economics professor Alan Gin. (Full Story)

2.02.15

Constitution Daily -- Michael Ramsey, law professor at the University of San Diego, points to Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, which features a laundry list of congressional powers and responsibilities. The authority to host a foreign leader is not included.

Article II, Section 3, on the other hand, says that the President “shall receive Ambassadors and other public Ministers.” This reception power is understood to be an exclusive power of the President, says Ramsey, by virtue both of tradition and of its specific call-out in Article II. (Full Story)

2.02.15

KPBS -- The report, "Shame On U.S.," said this lack of compliance is hurting kids and families. It was compiled by The Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law.

"We were seeing a lot of the problems in the system," Christina Riehl, the institute's senior staff attorney, told KPBS Midday Edition on Monday. "We were seeing that over and over again, and we didn't see improvements." (Full Story)

1.29.15

KUSI -- The numbers come from the University of San Diego's economist Alan Gin who compiles monthly reports on the local economy.

Alan Gin has been giving up-beat economic reports for several months now, and the positive news has pushed the local economic index to its highest level in more than seven years.

The economic index numbers remain tiny, however: up only 1.3 percent in November, .8 percent in December.

"Any change of one percent or more, in either direction during a month, is a significant change," said Gin. (Full Story)

1.29.15

U-T San Diego -- San Diego County's economy had a solid 2014, but the most impressive part came at the end of the year, says a new study released Thursday by the University of San Diego.

Led by gains in the job market and consumer confidence, the university's Index of Leading Economic Indicators for the county rose to a more than seven-year high in December. Stock prices increased, and so did job ads. At the same time, initial claims for unemployment fell. The county also got a boost from nationwide gains, as businesses here sell products and services to the rest of the country.

"The economy is just feeding on itself," said Alan Gin, economist at USD. "As more people get employed, there’s just more income in the economy, people are spending more and that just creates even more jobs." (Full Story)

1.27.15

The Daily Transcript -- “Justice Cossio’s appearance is a great opportunity for the campus and very exciting for us,” said David Shirk, director of the Justice in Mexico program.


“It will not only be a chance to hear the justice talk about the effects of judicial reform, a hot topic, but also bring together a number of key players in our efforts at USD to help promote the implementation of judicial reforms in Mexico.”


Shirk, a USD associate professor of political science and international relations, said the justice’s talk will also serve as the inaugural event in a planned series of trainings and exchanges with UNAM School of Law. (Full Story)

1.27.15

The Daytona Beach News-Journal -- “Our laws are weak. We don’t invest in solutions. Federal laws aren’t enforced. And courts are turning their backs. This creates a trifecta of inertia and neglect,” said Amy Harfeld, policy director at the Children’s Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law, which wrote the report with the nonprofit group First Star. (Full Story)

1.27.15

CBS News -- The 110-page report released Tuesday identified some of the same failures reported in December by The Associated Press after an eight-month investigation into hundreds of children who died of abuse or neglect in plain view of child protection authorities.

"Our laws are weak. We don't invest in solutions. Federal laws aren't enforced. And courts are turning their backs. This creates a trifecta of inertia and neglect," said Amy Harfeld, policy director at the Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law, which wrote the report with the nonprofit group First Star. (Full Story)

1.27.15

KPBS -- Federal officials say they're encouraged that the numbers are lower than they were in 2012. But children's advocates say that abuse is so often not reported that it's impossible to know if there's really been a decline.

"This is just something that's chronically underreported," says Elisa Weichel, a staff attorney with the Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law, which published the report Tuesday.

She says abuse and neglect cases — especially those resulting in death — are often not disclosed as required by law. That lack of information has led to other problems in the system.

"It all boils down to having the right amount of data about what's working and what's not," Weichel says. "And when your data is flawed, every other part of your system is going to be flawed." (Full Story)

1.27.15

Epoch Times -- In a statement released with the report, Elisa Weichel, Administrative Director and Staff Attorney at CAI, said, “It is no secret that child welfare law is disjointed and underfunded.” But people are not as aware the federal government is legally mandated to enforce certain standards for child protection, and the judicial branch makes it harder for people to sue to protect children. (Full Story

1.26.15

USA Today -- University of San Diego law professor Shaun Martin, an expert on 9th Circuit matters. Martin said it is unusual for the court to determine on its own that one case is related to a prior case and for the same panel of judges to assume jurisdiction over the subsequent case. Usually, Martin said, such determinations are made after a request by one of the sides. No such requests have been recorded in the 9th Circuit's list of filings in the O'Bannon case.

"With run-of-the-mill cases, no one around even remembers (what might be) a related case," Martin said. "This ain't a run-of-the-mill case."

Martin said that the NCAA's specific assertions about Bybee's Keller appeal opinion won't help its cause in the O'Bannon case, but the bigger issue is that the three judges "already have expressed their opinions in a related case." (Full Story)

1.12.15

10 News -- The San Diego economy gained momentum in a number of industries that should continue to do well in 2015, said USD economist Alan Gin. (Full Story).

 

12.10.14

NBC San Diego -- A new report finds the CIA's use of torture was far more brutal than anyone in the government knew, sparking national controversy. Here in San Diego, NBC 7's Megan Tevrizian talked with two people whose conclusions on the report could not have been more different. (Full Story)

12.09.14

U-T San Diego -- “Ultimately, the food pyramid that existed from 1992 to 2005 was scrapped, because it was not an effective teaching tool,” said Katie Ferraro, a registered dietitian and assistant clinical professor of nutrition at the University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science. During the pyramid’s 13-year run, Americans’ weight and waistlines expanded, while body mass index increased every year during that run.

Ferraro said criticisms of the 1992 pyramid included its lack of differentiation between refined, white grains and whole grains at the base of the pyramid; no differentiation between high-fat animal meats and lean protein choices; and no mention of portion sizes or exercise. (Full Story)

12.07.14

U-T San Diego -- For Katie Ferraro, a registered dietitian who enjoys a few tortilla chips now and then, her career has been based on the value of moderation.

“Every day, we’re all faced with numerous food choices,” she said. “We have to eat to survive. But I take issue with the guilt-laden approach to diet-food marketing these days. It’s mainly the frequency and portion size that gets you in trouble, not how many fat-free products you consume.”

An assistant clinical professor at UC San Francisco and the University of San Diego, Ferraro is also a UC San Diego Extension instructor who teaches four current courses: Cultural Foods, Introduction to Nutrition Sciences, Nutrition Therapy for Healthcare Professionals, and Nutrition Throughout the Lifecycle. (Full Story)

12.02.14

KPBS -- Tom Reifer, associate professor of sociology at USD and associate fellow at Trans-National Institute, spoke with KPBS about President Obama's stance on the events happening in Ferguson, MO, and a "militarized" police culture.  (Full Story)

12.02.14

U-T San Diego -- University of San Diego senior Connor Anderson was ranked 10th among a class of 5,617 seniors scheduled to graduate next spring by the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). (Full Story)

12.02.14

The Christian Science Monitor -- “Everybody likes simple solutions to complex problems,” says David Shirk, the director of the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego. “A lot of the things Peña Nieto proposed give lip service to fighting corruption, protecting human rights and ordinary citizens, but it doesn’t go to the heart of the problem: fighting corruption and strengthening weak institutions.” (Full Story)

12.02.14

The Moderate Voice -- After months of speculation, President Obama finally announced a sweeping executive action on immigration, which could potentially protect nearly 5 million undocumented immigrants from deportation.

In order to qualify, undocumented immigrants must have been here for more than five years, have children who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents, register, pass a criminal-background check, and pay any back taxes and associated fines they may owe.

Everard Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

12.01.14

Times of San Diego -- Don Dripps, a professor at the University of San Diego School of Law, told City News Service that an investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice could bring far more change to Ferguson than the prosecution of one police officer.

Such an investigation could result in a “consent decree” that would place the police department under a federal monitor, tighten use-of-force restrictions and require reporting of interactions between officers and the public. The restrictions would be imposed if a pattern of civil rights violations was found, he said.  (Full Story)

11.30.14

ABC 10 News San Diego -- Alan Gin, a professor of economics at the University of San Diego, says local sales were up this four-day weekend. He added that 55,000 more people have jobs compared to last year, there is an increase in consumer confidence and gas prices are down.

"Gas prices are down 54 cents, that's compared to a year ago. My estimate … that means we have $54 million that's available to spend in the local economy," said Gin. (Full Story)

11.26.14

Times of San Diego -- A University of San Diego student who has already launched one watch company is raising funds on Kickstarter for a second.

Nathan Resnick’s new Azula brand watches are made with a fabric background, with each timepiece unique because of different cuts of the fabric.

“Most watch faces are printed with ink. After looking for ways to stand out, I came up with the idea to put fabric on a watch face,” Resnick said. (Full Story)

11.26.14

Chicago Tribune -- Robert C. Fellmeth, a University of San Diego law professor and former prosecutor, said McCulloch may have erred by giving "a spirited defense of the grand jury's decision." (Full Story)

11.24.14

San Jose Mercury News -- "(The governor's) recent appointments to the California Supreme Court reflects a realization in Sacramento of something made decades ago in D.C. in connection with the U.S. Supreme Court," said Shaun Martin, a University of San Diego law professor. "The younger the justices are when they get appointed, the longer they stay there and affect the law." (Full Story)

11.21.14

Voice of San Diego -- Laura Dietrick, director of the Caster Family Center for Nonprofit and Philanthropic Research at the University of San Diego, is working with local nonprofits to use both quantitative and qualitative measures to appease stakeholders and capture the fuzzier change communities and clients experience.

“To say, ‘You haven’t achieved this impact. You’ve been here for five or 10 or 15 years,’ I think is a little shortsighted,” Dietrick said. “But there needs to be proof of short-term wins along the way.”  (Full Story)

11.20.14

Rancho Santa Fe Review -- The Rancho Santa Fe Foundation commissioned the Caster Center for Nonprofit and Philanthropic Research at the University of San Diego to conduct a needs assessment study to better understand the food and transportation needs of the vulnerable senior population in North County. Mary Jo Schumann, Ph.D., associate director of the Caster Center at USD, concluded in the report that “seniors don’t eat well alone,” and that transportation is a key issue in North County. The report suggested “bringing the food to the seniors” via a food truck.  (Full Story)

11.19.14

Bloomberg Businessweek -- The litigation is “mushrooming,” Orly Lobel, a University of San Diego law professor, said in an interview. “Once there’s a visible test case, you look around to see where else it’s happening, and the next cases are easier to put together.” (Full Story)

11.18.14

Times of San Diego -- Alan Jin, a professor of economics at the University of San Diego, said President Obama’s veto power means there could still be gridlock, but predicted “a little bit of compromise” with benefits for San Diego’s military-based economy. (Full Story)

11.18.14

Voice of San Diego -- Orly Lobel, a labor and employment law professor at the University of San Diego, argues this pro-employee law has contributed to success of serial software and biotechnology entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley and San Diego alike.

“That prohibition against non-competes has actually invigorated the economy,” she said.  (Full Story)

11.18.14

KPBS -- Laura Deitrick heads the Caster Family Center for Nonprofit and Philanthropic Research at the University of San Diego. She said reversing generations of disinvestment in City Heights is going to take, well, generations.

"Everyone wants to talk about impact, and if you're not making an impact in, like, five minutes, then you must not be doing it right," Dietrick said. "But, you know, if you think back to the beginning of a big company like eBay or Amazon and you look at how long it took them to even break even, investors didn't blink an eye. We think that's normal. I think we need to be realistic about what we're trying to achieve and how long that's going to take."  (Full Story)

11.12.14

Education World -- The University of San Diego was awarded a $600,000 grant from The National Science Foundation to hire more female STEM professors. The university hired eight professors to begin teaching classes in fall 2014. (Full Story)

11.11.14

U-T San Diego -- Tuesday’s parade paid tribute to Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, the first time that the annual event has ever focused on the post-9/11 generation.

Throngs of student veterans from San Diego State, the University of San Diego and other local colleges formed the largest group representing that era. (Full Story)

11.11.14

U-T San Diego -- This year, the county sent out property tax bills expecting to collect $5.07 billion in property tax revenue. That trounces the fiscal year 2012-13 total of $3.8 billion. Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said the increased property tax revenue may not solve the shortfall, but it’ll help.

“When the recession ended, that meant that we stopped dropping, but coming back from it just took a long time,” he said. “Property tax revenue would be impacted due to declining home values, sales tax revenue would be affected because consumers weren’t spending as much, and then you have greater need.” (Full Story)

11.10.14

Voice of San Diego -- TFA’s targeted efforts help them land students like Liset Godinez, a senior at the University of San Diego who started the school’s first Latina sorority. Godinez grew up in Sherman Heights and was attracted to TFA specifically because it would allow her to give back to the neighborhoods like the one she grew up in.

After she sent in her application, she met with Lopez and asked him about the chances of being placed locally. Lopez told her he doesn’t have final say over where corps members land, but told her she did three things right: She got her application in on time, she’s from San Diego and she’s bilingual.

Next year she’ll be in a San Diego classroom near you, teaching bilingual studies. (Full Story)

11.10.14

KPBS -- Once again, the home base for the Festival is the UltraStar Theaters at Hazard Center. Closing night will be at Sherwood Auditorium at The Museum of Contemporary Art in La Jolla. The centerpiece film, "Fresh Off the Boat" on Nov. 8, will be screened at the University of San Diego Shiley Theater where this festival first began 15 years ago. (Full Story)

11.07.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said the wage growth reported doesn't necessarily mean the same person in the same job got a 2 percent raise.

"Some people are going to get raises, other people are going to move on to a higher paying job, and some low paying jobs will be lost," Gin said.

Gin said recent increases to the minimum wage, such as California's recently moving to $9 per hour, aren't large enough to make a sizeable impact on the national data.  (Full Story)

11.05.14

Triple Pundit -- Consumers are already seeing a difference. Walter Wang, an adviser with ZSA and Adjunct Professor at the University of San Diego School of Law, pointed out that many utility ratepayers have seen a “climate credit” on their bills this year. “There is real value in these programs going forward,” Wang said, “and while ‘energy efficiency’ isn’t sexy, there is immediate value and a short payback period.” (Full Story)

11.04.14

U-T San Diego -- To University of San Diego adjunct professor of theatre arts, Ryan Beattie Scrimger, the connection is precisely as the Bard doth quote: “All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.”

“Most of us already use the life skills that acting courses can help sharpen and define,” said Scrimger, a mainstay of San Diego’s theatre scene. “They are the basic skills of problem-solving, collaboration, persuasion, negotiation, and self-confidence.” (Full Story)

11.04.14

KYMA News 11 -- "We know that water is a scarce resource in California. The idea is that we would invest in shoring up the resources we have," University of San Diego Professor Casey Dominguez said.

The programs would include watershed restoration and protection… ground water storage and ecosystem sustainability.

"This bond initiative is not going to do anything to fix a short term water problem but in terms of managing the Delta and the water supplies out of the Delta, restoring ecosystems and watersheds to protect future water supplies," Dominguez said. (Full Story)

10.29.14

KYMA News 11 -- University of San Diego Professor Carl Luna predicts the proposition will go in favor of the medical field.

Luna says usually when there’s a lot of money backing the proposition it wins.

"There has been a massive amount of money spent by the medical community against this and in general the more money you spend the better you have a chance to win," Luna said. (Full Story)

10.28.14

Tech News World -- "The licensing decision is another devastating decision -- albeit somewhat expected -- for Aereo," said Orly Lobel, professor of law at the University of San Diego.

"The judge in the decision nodded to Aereo ... 'doing its best to turn lemons into lemonade,'" she told the E-Commerce Times. (Full Story)

10.21.14

U-T San Diego -- In September, foreclosure resales made up 3.3 percent of transactions in the county. Norm Miller, a real-estate professor at the University of San Diego, said about six months ago the university stopped using foreclosures in its models for predicting prices.

“The home prices have gone up enough now that we’re not seeing strategic defaults anymore,” he said. “There are a few pockets still with lingering inventory, and still some even here, but they’re not enough of the market to drive prices the way they were.”  (Full Story)

10.21.14

U-T San Diego -- “Those are the type of jobs that we want in this economy,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “Because they’re high paying, people spend in the economy. That boosts the housing market, car dealerships, and restaurants.”  (Full Story)

10.21.14

U-T San Diego -- Zachary Green, a University of San Diego professor, said another challenge will be drawing young people into civic discourse when they are more focused on Facebook than newspapers and more traditional media.

“There’s a new generation of people who are wired differently,” he said.  (Full Story)

10.16.14

KPBS -- Kellie Sandman-Hurley has a doctorate in literacy with a specialty in dyslexia. She runs the Dyslexia Training Institute through the University of San Diego.

This is how she describes the disorder:

“Dyslexia is a phonological processing disorder. It affects the student’s ability to decode and encode. And so it affects their fluency rate, it affects their spelling. It just makes reading more difficult.”  (Full Story)

10.11.14

Los Angeles Times -- Undisclosed emails and other private conversations are representative of the "endemic corruption" in state government created by "the imbalance" in lobbying power between wealthy corporations and advocacy groups that speak for consumers and utility ratepayers, said Robert Fellmeth, a regulatory law expert and director of the Center for Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

10.11.14

U-T San Diego -- “I am not a proponent of the idea that we can conserve our way out of those policy problems,” said John Minan, a law professor at the University of San Diego and a former chairman of the California Regional Water Quality Control Board. “Clearly, additional conservation is necessary. But you reach a point where conservation simply doesn’t produce additional water resources. So the struggle and challenge will be to find additional water resources.” (Full Story)

10.11.14

U-T San Diego -- This is why RISE, in collaboration with the University of San Diego’s Leadership Institute, is creating a program to nurture rising leaders to engage in community change work. (Full Story)

10.10.14

Mission Valley News -- Where Trans-Border Institute Director Everard Meade sees the need for the U.S. to fix dysfunctional immigration courts, University of San Diego Professor David Shirk said the U.S. should invest more in the immigrants’ home countries so people wouldn’t have to leave — and spend less on fortifying our borders to stop them after they’ve started the journey. (Full Story)

10.10.14

U-T San Diego -- Question: Will continued security breaches at banks, retailers and other businesses start to harm the economy anytime soon?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

But there may be some long-term concerns. (Full Story)

10.09.14

“The outlook is for continued solid growth in San Diego’s economy at least through the first half of 2015,” said USD professor Alan Gin. “The local economy has done well so far this year, with the county on a pace to add 31,000 jobs.”  (Full Story)

10.07.14

National Catholic Reporter -- Even though the synod is still in its earliest stages, NCR asked University of Notre Dame sociologist Mary Ellen Konieczny and University of San Diego theologian Emily Reimer-Barry, both of whom study Catholic family life, to weigh in....  Reimer-Barry wrote: "I am uplifted by the descriptions of the Synod's first session because Pope Francis, Cardinal Erdo, and Ron and Mavis Pirola have captured just the right tone in their remarks. All emphasized the need to listen with humility. I hope the Synod can symbolize for the Catholic faithful that the church is not only a teaching church but a learning church."  (Full Story)

10.07.14

National Catholic Reporter -- "Millennials are not hopelessly relativistic," said Emily Reimer-Barry, an assistant professor of theology at the University of San Diego. "My students are not interested in 'anything goes' or 'it's all relative,' but they are focused on getting away from a strict, rule-based 'this is the truth because we say so' attitude. They want attention paid to a variety of people's experiences."  (Full Story)

10.02.14

KUSI -- David Shirk at the Institute for Peace and Justice at the University of San Diego said, it is possible that the Mexican government could, and especially the prosecutors, could choose to treat this as a special case.

He added not to jump to conclusions.

"I think we have to recognize this is a very different system than our own, and we don't want to make any assumptions about where things are headed," said Shirk.  (Full Story)

9.30.14

NPR -- Mexico's support for DACA applicants may seem counterintuitive, says Emily Edmonds-Poli, a professor who teaches Mexican politics at the University of San Diego, but she said it shows that the Mexican government is acknowledging a decades-long migration trend that led to 9 percent of people born in Mexico now living in the U.S.

That has driven Mexico to build better relations with Mexicans abroad in hopes of maintaining remittance flows and other cross-border economic activity.

"I think the message that it's trying to send is that the Mexican government supports its population living in the U.S.," Edmonds-Poli says. "I don't think that that is the message that will be received in the U.S." (Full Story)

9.29.14

NBC San Diego -- The military investigates allegations of extra-marital affairs out of necessity, said George E. Reed the Associate Dean of the School of Leadership and Sciences at USD.


“The reason for that predominantly is that they have access to an extraordinary of destructive potential and therefore we want people who have that access to also exercise good judgment and exercise control,” Reed said. (Full Story)

9.25.14

NBC San Diego -- "That's business that people don’t do because they decide not to go to the San Diego Zoo because the border wait is too long. Or people in San Diego are saying, I don’t want to go to wine country in Ensenada,” explained David Shirk, an associate professor at the University of San Diego who studies Mexico and border issues.  (Full Story)

9.23.14

U-T San Diego -- “The further away you are from the economic activity, the center of the cities, the less expensive housing is,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “There’s a trade-off. You take the better housing and in exchange pay more in terms of gas and also the time of commuting.”  (Full Story)

9.23.14

U-T San Diego -- “It’s encouraging that you’ve got strengths in all sorts of areas, particularly in professional and technical services, construction and health care,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “Those categories I think indicate pretty good news.”  (Full Story)

9.22.14

U-T San Diego -- Carl Luna, a political scientist at Mesa College and the University of San Diego, said he was optimistic it would boost transparency.

“It’s an attempt to let people know who’s placing bets on which candidate,” Luna said. “Despite the Supreme Court saying contributions don’t come with expectations you’ll get something back, I think voters deserve the right to weigh in and know who’s putting up big money to support somebody.”  (Full Story)

9.21.14

U-T San Diego -- “When you’re causing bleeding, when you’re leaving scars, that’s a very, very obvious line that shouldn’t be crossed,” said Robert Fellmeth, a lawyer who heads the Children’s Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego. “You cause that kind of injury, you’re a child abuser.” (Full Story)

9.08.14

U-T San Diego -- With the breakup of dominant drug cartels in many parts of Mexico, smaller criminal groups have sought to make money by targeting businesses through crimes such as larceny, kidnapping and extortion, said David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego and head of the Justice in Mexico project. (Full Story

9.08.14

U-T San Diego -- Alain Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said he wasn't concerned about the monthly slowdown, noting that recent gross domestic product numbers were strong, showing annual 4.2 percent growth in the second quarter. (Full Story

9.08.14

U-T San Diego -- “It’s going to make the race tighter than it might have been,” said Carl Luna, a political science professor at Mesa College and the University of San Diego. “It could offset the advantage you’d expect the Republican to have from lower turnout in a mid-term election.” (Full Story

9.02.14

U-T San Diego -- “I would use the word ‘great’ as far as the local economy is concerned,” said University of San Diego economist Alan Gin. (Full Story

9.02.14

U-T San Diego -- “In an economy there’s always going to be some displacement, there’s going to be some churning. Businesses move, they go out of business, they lay people off,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

8.29.14

Education News -- While every child should be able to have the same access to learning devices as every other student, there are still other issues that could cause disadvantages at home, says Scott Himelstein, director of the Mobile Technology Learning Center at the University of San Diego. Many do not have access to broadband Internet at home. (Full Story

8.28.14

Bloomberg -- Orly Lobel, a law professor at the University of San Diego who specializes in labor and employment issues, said Koh’s suggestion of $380 million is a “threshold” and doesn’t necessarily meet her interpretation of the required legal standard for what’s reasonable, fair and adequate. (Full Story

8.11.14

Bloomberg Businessweek -- Orly Lobel, a law professor at University of San Diego who specializes in labor and employment issues, agreed that the dollar amount proposed in the settlement is “problematic.” (Full Story

8.05.14

U-T San Diego -- The new approach doesn’t mean students avoid punishment, said Justine Darling, who founded the restorative justice program at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

7.29.14

Fox News -- Here are some answers to questions frequently asked about the case, which will next be taken up in a Tijuana federal court on Aug. 4. Compiled interviews with University of San Diego legal expert Octavio Rodríguez Ferreira, who also serves as Coordinator for the school’s Justice in Mexico Project. (Full Story

7.29.14

National Catholic Reporter -- According to David Shirk, a professor of political science and international relations at the University of San Diego, "The key difference between the kind of violence we saw in most of the 20th century in Central America and the kind of violence that we see today is that we've moved from ideological conflict to essentially a conflict between criminals and the state, outlaws who have no explicit political objective.

"The economic objectives are those that loom largest," he said, "but I think that there is more to it than that. It's not just about making money -- it's also about belonging." (Full Story

7.29.14

KPBS -- In contrast, tens of thousands of other Central Americans have become caught up in a cycle of deportation and reentry that has had far-reaching consequences, said Ev Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

7.21.14

KPBS -- The San Diego City Council unanimously approved a deal on Monday to keep the manufacturing facilities of Illumina, a medical device company, in the city for 10 years in exchange for a $1.5 million tax rebate.

Alan Gin is economics professor at the University of San Diego and author of USD's Index of Leading Economic Indicators. (Full Story

7.20.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said it’s getting harder for low-wage workers because pay hasn’t kept up with living costs. (Full Story

7.18.14

San Diego 6 News -- "I find it kind of frustrating, you know, because Omnitracs started with Qualcomm, a San Diego company, and it’s tough to see them leaving like this,” said Alan Gin, an economics professor at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

7.11.14

U-T San Diego -- Question: Is there a long-term economic impact of thousands of undocumented children entering the U.S. from Central America?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

There may be a local economic impact in the communities directly involved. (Full Story

7.09.14

highervisibility.com -- John Bertino is an SEO instructor at USD. 

There is tremendous value in educating today’s marketing students about SEO as well as search engine theories and concepts in general. As students gain a better understanding of how search engine’s actually work, they’ll also understand how SEO plays into many – perhaps most – of their digital marketing efforts. There are actually many offline marketing and SEO tie-ins as well! (Full Story

7.07.14

NBC Channel 4 -- The immigration debate in the U.S. generally operates with a different set of facts, according to Everard Meade, Director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

7.07.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Low interest rates

The most surprising thing to me about the economy in the first half of 2014 has been that interest rates have not increased. (Full Story

7.07.14

U-T San Diego -- “I think it’s a victory for Dumanis,” said Robert Fellmeth, director of the University of San Diego’s Center for Public Interest Law and a former deputy district attorney. (Full Story

7.02.14

CBS 8 -- However, University of San Diego Trans-Border Institute Director Ev Meade says their research on immigration issues proves there is no need for panic. (Full Story

7.02.14

WalletHub.com -- “The Fourth of July falling on a Friday this year means that more people will be traveling for the holiday. It sets up a three day weekend and the fact that it starts on a Friday makes it even more conducive for travel," said USD economist Alan Gin. "People can leave after work on Thursday or even Friday morning and still be able to make an evening event for the Fourth. If it had fallen on a Monday, people would’ve had to travel on the Fourth and missed the events associated with the holiday.” (Full Story)

7.01.14

CBS 8 -- "Most of the fears and things about disease and criminality and about the border being let open to everybody they just are not really true,” said Ev Meade.

He is the director of Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego, a research group studying immigration issues. (Full Story

6.30.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

The economy requires a more educated workforce than ever before, and the CSU and UC systems may not have the capacity to meet that need. (Full Story

6.30.14

KUSI -- University of San Diego law professor Orley Lobel said she didn't think the broadcasters' complaint would fizzle. (Full Story

6.30.14

Public News Service -- Everard Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego, said at a recent city planning commission meeting most in attendance opposed the lease. (Full Story

6.26.14

Bloomberg -- That chart is also key to understanding Tesla’s decision to share its patents in order to grow the electric vehicle industry, as I discussed today with Orly Lobel of University of San Diego. (Full Story

6.20.14

Bloomberg -- While the migrants’ stories couldn’t be independently verified, violent gang recruitment and extortion is pervasive in Central America, said Ev Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

6.20.14

U-T San Diego -- Question: Does the turmoil in Iraq, with a possible impact on oil prices, pose any threat to the economic recovery?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

But the threat is small at this point. (Full Story

6.19.14

Bloomberg -- “There is a tendency to approve these class settlements if they are not on their face egregiously unreasonable,” Orly Lobel, a law professor at the University of San Diego, said in an e-mail. (Full Story

6.17.14

NBC News -- In 2011, during the peak of Mexico’s drug violence, there were more homicides in Ciudad Juarez than there were casualties in Afghanistan. Those numbers dropped nationwide by 15 percent in 2013, mostly because smaller regional cartels were swallowed up by larger “criminal monopolies,” said David Shirk, director of the Justice in Mexico project at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

6.17.14

Fortune -- “This shows a realization that Aereo or similar models will eventually be inevitable and better to find ways to coexist and mutually benefit from these technology leaps and new business models,” Orly Lobel, professor of labor and employment law at the University of San Diego School of Law said. (Full Story

6.13.14

Bloomberg -- There’s a lot of thinking in the research these days on the gap between the codified knowledge that is patentable and gets disclosed versus tacit knowledge that really exists in how you actually produce,” says Orly Lobel, a law professor at the University of San Diego specializing in intellectual property. (Full Story

6.13.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

Student-loan debt now tops $1 trillion, making it second only to home mortgage debt among households. (Full Story

6.09.14

Fox News -- "The initial statements will be submitted and the judge will schedule another hearing to present evidence," said Octavio Rodriguez, Justice in Mexico project coordinator at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

6.09.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego 

Answer: No

Vouchers should be incorporated to provide some flexibility for veterans to get some basic forms of care in the private sector. (Full Story

6.08.14

The New York Times -- “There has been a definite, significant rise in the use of noncompetes, and not only for high tech, not only for high-skilled knowledge positions,” said Orly Lobel, a professor at the University of San Diego School of Law, who wrote a recent book on noncompetes. (Full Story

6.06.14

U-T San Diego -- “Events in Chula Vista are so far to get to,” said Carl Luna, professor at the University of San Diego and an expert on San Diego government. (Full Story

6.05.14

The Boston Globe -- Orly Lobel, a professor of law and innovation policy specialist at the University of San Diego School of Law, says Aereo should be applauded for designing its technology to fit within the Cablevision precedent, not criticized for exploiting some kind of loophole. (Full Story

6.03.14

KPBS -- If the district does offer a halal option, there's a good chance it will see some pushback, Adina Batnitzky said. She's a sociologist at the University of San Diego who studies health disparities related to acculturation. (Full Story

6.02.14

Los Angles Times -- According to Leonard Simon, a San Diego-based attorney with Robbins, Geller, Rudman & Dowd, and adjunct professor at the University of San Diego, Gonzalez might have a case if he can show the Lakers treated him poorly, based on his heritage. (Full Story

5.27.14

Voice of San Diego -- Esteban del Rio, director of the Center for Inclusion and Diversity at the University of San Diego, said that whether a student feels welcome on campus is a huge indicator of campus climate. (Full Story

5.23.14

Fox News -- David Shirk, a political science professor at the University of San Diego, where he heads the Justice in Mexico Project, said the border ports of entry are complicated but that he understands Mexico’s response. (Full Story

5.23.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No 

The fires were tragic for those who were affected, but the damage was much less than the previous fires we have experienced. (Full Story

5.23.14

Fox 5 -- Robert Fellmeth, a University of San Diego School of Law professor and former deputy district attorney, says he expects the manufacturers to challenge the counties’ authority over federally regulated drugs. (Full Story

5.21.14

U-T San Diego -- Norm Miller, a real-estate professor at the University of San Diego, said the monthly uptick was likely due to bank activity and says nothing about the current housing market. (Full Story

5.19.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

No. It could have other negative effects, such as reducing the free flow of information and allowing people to present a sanitized version of themselves online. (Full Story

5.05.14

U-T San Diego -- “The question that I think you’re really asking: can we speculate about how come Jane Doe from La Jolla celebrates it?” said Alberto Pulido, a professor of ethnic studies at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

5.05.14

U-T San Diego -- Said Iris Engstrand, a history professor at the University of San Diego: “People were starting to think, ‘Maybe we can make a statement. Maybe we will amount to something.’ ” (Full Story)

5.05.14

U-T San Diego -- “If that was the only data point we had I would be a little bit worried, but combined with the big job growth numbers, I think the net result is that it’s just positive developments for the labor market,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

4.25.14

The Boston Herald -- Intellectual property law professor Orly Lobel from the University of San Diego said the justices’ questions could foreshadow a narrow ruling, with the court restricting a decision to Aereo rather than setting a precedent for others. (Full Story

4.25.14

The Washington Post -- The settlement is “unsurprising because of all the embarrassing e-mails and orchestration from the top that would come out in trial,” Orly Lobel, a law professor at the University of San Diego, said in an e-mail. (Full Story

4.24.14

U-T San Diego -- “Jobs are growing and that means more money,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “Cars are one place that people put their money when their incomes increase.” (Full Story

4.16.14

U-T San Diego -- Norm Miller, a professor of real estate at the University of San Diego, said it’s expected that real estate appreciation would slow. (Full Story

4.14.14

KPBS -- “They (opera directors) should stop the clock ticking on this April deadline because no person or organization makes good decisions under pressure,” said Pat Libby, director of University of San Diego’s Institute for Nonprofit Education and Research. (Full Story

4.14.14

Fox Business -- “It was about time,” said University of San Diego international business professor Jaime Alonso Gomez who has been following the reform. (Full Story

4.14.14

The Boston Globe -- In the words of Orly Lobel, a University of San Diego law professor, “Every time there’s a new technology, the big content producers and distributors rush to the courts and say, ‘The sky will fall.’ But every time, it proves to be false.” (Full Story

4.04.14

U-T San Diego -- “If they’re counting turnaways as deportations, that does seem to inflate the numbers and change the overall picture of what we’ve seen in the last few years, or what we thought we’ve been seeing, which is a greatly elevated rate of deportations of people who have successfully made it into the U.S. and are presumably were living here for some amount of time,” said David Shirk, an associate professor of political science and international relations at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

4.01.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

While the economy is not great, it is doing better, as evidenced by the declining unemployment rate. (Full Story

3.28.14

Times of San Diego -- Carl Luna is a professor of political science at San Diego Mesa College and the director of the Institute for Civil Civic Engagement at the University of San Diego.

Most schools no longer teach cursive handwriting. Most schools also spend little time on teaching block printing or even keyboarding skills. Indeed, the whole curriculum of language arts—the means, media and skills of effective interpersonal communication—have increasingly been marginalized in an age of mandatory testing and voluntary texting. Our students leave school able to digitally communicate with thumb and index finger on a phone or tablet but not in face-to-face dialogue with their fellow corporeal citizens.

In Solana Beach, a debate over allowing more parties with alcohol at a community center turned rancorous, with invectives hurled, friendships ended and a community divided. In Coronado, a public forum on open-campus policies for students degenerated into parents verbally attacking the character of each other’s children. In San Diego the mayoral campaign became reduced to the labeling of opposing candidates as untrustworthy tools of nefarious special interests. Even after policy and electoral choices are made, the communities involved remained divided, suspicious and angry.

So what do these two separate issues—changing education and uncivil civil engagement—have in common? The answer is that the later—incivility in public discourse around San Diego—is closely tied to the former—the simple fact that we don’t teach the skills of successful civic engagement in our community as well as we should. The result: as the skill of civil engagement deteriorates, so too does civility in our public lives and, so too, do our sense of community and our ability to resolve our common problems. (Full Story)

 

3.24.14

U-T San Diego -- “There was that period in the middle of last year when things looked like they were really dragging,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, who called Friday’s report solid. (Full Story)

3.24.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

Things are more difficult for some businesses in San Diego in terms of the cost of housing, regulations, taxes, etc. than in other metropolitan areas. (Full Story

3.21.14

Los Angeles Times -- "They are the strongest players in Mexico right now and their trafficking routes come through California," said Ami Carpenter, an assistant professor at the University of San Diego who contributed research to the report. (Full Story

3.17.14

KPBS -- University of San Diego economist Alan Gin said the increase in gas prices will reach far beyond the pump. He said a large chunk of the region's economic activity is based on consumer spending. (Full Story

3.13.14

Fox 5 -- University of San Diego economist Alan Gin told the audience that the minimum wage had its greatest buying power in 1968, when it was just $1.65 per hour. If adjusted for inflation, it would be $13.87 today, he said. (Full Story

3.10.14

U-T San Diego -- “The economy seemed to just be able to power through all these things that we worried about,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

3.10.14

U-T San Diego -- “When you talk about community members, you are talking about adults who played the instrument when they were younger, and for whatever reason, they had to stop; that’s the most common,” said Angela Yeung, who also conducts the Coastal Communities Concert Band and teaches at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

3.10.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego 

Answer: No

Other than the initial selloff on Monday, the financial markets don’t seem to be very concerned with the situation. (Full Story

3.02.14

ABC7 -- Guzman outlasted contemporaries by forging temporary alliances with other traffickers and sharing intelligence on rivals with government officials who killed or arrested them, said David Shirk, associate political science professor at the University of San Diego.

"The Sinaloa Cartel brought economies of scale and organizational capacity but, most importantly, they knew how to knock out their rivals," Shirk said. "There's more to this than knowing how to hide the drugs. It's about good intel and good working relations with the authorities." (Full Story)

3.01.14

U-T San Diego -- Much of San Diego’s skilled construction labor base left town — and they are slow to come back, says University of San Diego economist Alan Gin.

“Construction workers don’t want to locate here because there was little work, but the fact that there’s no workers here could affect the number of projects the developers put out,” Gin said.

He predicts that workers will return at some point. Building permits have rebounded from Great Recession lows, rising 46 percent in 2013.

Gin’s analysis of employment and permit trends suggests that it takes two years before an increase in permits translates into strong hiring activity.

“If you build that lag into consideration, what we would expect is a boom in the next couple of years in terms of construction employment,” he said. (Full Story

2.25.14

NPR -- "As long as these other structures remain in place, all things being equal, Sinaloa will be able to continue to operate if not as normal, at least as the most powerful criminal organization in Mexico," said David Shirk, director of the University of San Diego's Justice in Mexico Project. (Full Story

2.25.14

U-T San Diego -- But income inequality has been an issue since the 1980s, long before the Great Recession, said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

2.22.14

U-T San Diego--The 13-year hunt for the world’s most powerful drug trafficker ended without a gunshot Saturday in an oceanview condo building in Mexico’s Pacific port city of Mazatlan.

Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman Loera, leader of the Sinaloa cartel, was captured alongside a companion at 6:40 a.m. in what Mexican attorney general Jesus Murillo Karam described as an “impeccable action” by Mexican Navy commandos.

Murillo said the mission was carried out with backing from Mexican law-enforcement agencies and “very full collaboration” of some U.S. agencies.

Guzman “is such an iconic and legendary figure in Mexico,” said David Shirk, a political science and international relations professor at the University of San Diego and director of the Justice in Mexico Project.

“He’s been so incredibly elusive for so long that many people have interpreted that as having some kind of protection from the Mexican government” Shirk added. “(His arrest) is a very strong statement that they are serious about continuing to wage the war on drugs.” (Full Story

2.21.14

U-T San Diego--Alan Gin, University of San Diego 

Answer: NO

For the immediate future, San Diego is in relatively good shape in terms of our water supply due to our reliance on the Colorado River. There’s not as much trouble with that source this year compared to the rest of California. It is the long-term that is a concern. More demands are being put on the Colorado River and the competition for its use may negatively impact San Diego’s economy in the future. It will become increasingly expensive to supply water for the region’s growing population. Also, in the past, industries such as biotechnology have raised questions about the availability of water, and that might affect their growth. (Full Story)

2.18.14

Los Angeles Times -- "We have not seen ... a smarter border as a result of efforts over the last decade ... to create a 21st century border," David Shirk, a border expert at the University of San Diego and global fellow at the Wilson Center's Mexico Institute, said in a conference call with reporters. (Full Story

2.18.14

U-T San Diego -- “It is not good to send a student where his or her academic qualifications are going to be lower than the average students’,” said Gail Heriot, a University of San Diego law professor who was co-chair of the Proposition 209 campaign in 1996. “To some people, it would seem like they are doing a favor to the student who is getting the preferences, but it ends up being the opposite.” (Full Story)

2.10.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said a move for a company like Websense might make sense. (Full Story

2.10.14

KPBS -- University of San Diego Chicano studies professor Isidro Ortiz said underneath the image lurks a dangerous, and racist, message. (Full Story

1.27.14

KPBS -- Even though Love was found not guilty, Prof. Junichi Semitsu of the University of San Diego School of Law says this case shows Twitter is fair game in libel suits. (Full Story

1.27.14

U-T San Diego -- “A lot of people were blaming that on the weather nationally, but obviously we weren’t impacted by that here,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

1.27.14

U-T San Diego -- “You can’t compete with buyers coming in all-cash because all that the sellers are looking for is a quick close,” said said Joe Bertocchini, residential real estate director at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

1.27.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

The real value of the minimum wage has fallen more than 40 percent since its peak in 1968. (Full Story

1.21.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

San Diego’s economy is heavily impacted by outside forces, e.g., defense spending and tourism. (Full Story

1.21.14

10News -- 10News went to University of San Diego economics professor Alan Gin to ask him his thoughts about all these wage increases.

"I think there are going to be some winners and losers," Gin said. "People will have more money to spend so they'll go out and they'll spend that. That will give a boost to the economy." (Full Story

1.14.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said there’s always job loss in the economy, but without historical data, it’s hard to put the New York Fed’s percentages into context. (Full Story

1.06.14

U-T San Diego -- “You did miss the party in terms of the bottom,” said Norm Miller, a real estate professor at the University of San Diego. “You’re going to be paying more, and you might have this fear that it’s going to get away from you and you have to jump now, but that’s an irrational fear.” (Full Story

1.06.14

U-T San Diego -- “I think things will be positive in 2014 (for San Diego),” said Alan Gin, associate professor of economics at the University of San Diego. “I think we’ll have what I consider good growth. We’ll add about 25,000 jobs to the local economy. That will be enough to push the unemployment rate from about 7 percent to the low 6 percent range.” (Full Story

1.02.14

U-T San Diego -- In the past 12 months, county employers have added 23,000 nonfarm payroll jobs, a number called solid by Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

1.02.14

Lost Angeles Times -- "We've created a new man-made ecosystem of plastic debris," said Lopez, a graduate student at the University of San Diego, during the recent expedition. (Full Story

1.02.14

SF Gate -- UST cites lead 2013 research from Norm G. Miller, PhD, professor at University of San Diego, Burnham-Moores, Center for Real Estate. Miller and other housing experts predict that the trend toward more-efficient use of office space will continue to trend towards using home office spaces and community officing. (Full Story

12.19.13

The Hechinger Report -- That idea makes sense to Scott Himelstein, interim director of University of San Diego’s Mobile Technology Learning Center, which studies how mobile devices in classrooms affect teaching and learning. (Full Story

12.16.13

U-T San Diego -- “Sometimes it appears we’re paying these people quite a bit of money,” said Pat Libby, who directs the University of San Diego’s Institute for Nonprofit Education and Research. (Full Story

12.13.13

The Economist -- A new book, “Talent Wants to Be Free”, by Orly Lobel, a law professor at the University of San Diego, presents a powerful counterblast to this argument. The drawbacks of the free-rider problem are as nothing compared with the advantages conferred by mobility. (Full Story

12.10.13

The Daily Transcript -- "The bar exam is pretty out-of-date at this point and needs to be updated," said Ted Sichelman, a University of San Diego School of Law professor who teaches intellectual property. (Full Story

12.10.13

New York Times -- She cited a paper by the philosopher Matt Zwolinski of the University of San Diego in the December 2011 issue of the journal Basic Income Studies, which also contained other papers by libertarians supporting the basic income concept. While acknowledging that most libertarians would reject explicit redistribution of income, he pointed to several libertarians, including the economists F.A. Hayek and Milton Friedman, who favored the idea of a basic universal income. (Full Story)   

12.09.13

Fox 5 -- James Gump, a history professor at University of San Diego, also feels the sense of loss. He took a group of students to South Africa in 2012 and visited Robben Island where Mandela was imprisoned for 27 years. (Full Story

12.09.13

Denver Post -- "All of these kids that die, there is an adorable picture of each of them," said Christina Riehl, senior staff attorney with the Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego. "When you take that away, it becomes another number on a page." (Full Story

12.06.13

CNN Money -- More and more new hires are being asked to sign these contracts "across all industries and in all kinds of jobs," notes Orly Lobel, a law professor at the University of San Diego and cofounder of its Center for Intellectual Property Law and Markets. She also wrote a new book you might want to check out, called Talent Wants to Be Free: Why We Should Learn to Love Leaks, Raids, and Free Riding. (Full Story

12.06.13

U-T San Diego -- "If you lost your job but you needed a place to stay you'd go with the lowest possible thing you could get," said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

12.01.13

UT-San Diego--...Alan Gin, University of San Diego: Answer: NO

While there may be some minor pullbacks, the environment for stocks remains strong. Of particular importance is the low interest rate environment, which is likely to continue with the appointment of interest rate dove Janet Yellen to chair the Federal Reserve. Also, corporate profits remain strong, with the S&P 500 trading at about 15 times next year’s earnings, which is not an out of line P/E ratio. Companies have been able to maintain profits even in a weakly recovering economy by holding down costs, particularly labor costs, which is contributing to the weak recovery. Thus, a good stock market doesn’t necessarily mean a good economy... (Full Story)

 

12.01.13

Huffington Post-- ...After a survey showed that up to 82% of people find overhearing cellphone conversations annoying, Veronica Galván, a cognitive psychologist at the University of San Diego, decided to study why these are such a pain... (Full Story)

12.01.13

California Lawyer--...Some critics of the dependency court system believe that its chronic underfunding speaks to an uncomfortable truth: Juvenile courts routinely short-change a particularly vulnerable segment of the population.
"We treat these kids like crap on purpose by knowingly underfunding what we know they need," says Ed Howard of the Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego. "And that has only gotten worse." Howard claims that every aspect of the state's dependency courts - from social service investigations and court hearings to foster care placements - fails to deliver... (Full Story)

11.25.13

UT-San Diego--For generations of California's schoolchildren, Father Junípero Serra is the founder of the Golden State's 21 missions and the subject of a fourth-grade mission project.

For Spaniards, he is the erudite Franciscan missionary who made the treacherous journey to an unfamiliar land and spread Spanish culture and the Catholic faith up and down thousands of miles of coastline.

To Native Americans, he is a source of anguish because of the way some Spanish settlers treated the Indians they encountered.

To Iris Engstrand, a professor of history at the University of San Diego and an expert in San Diego and California studies, he's a bit of all three, and a lot more. (Full Story)

11.21.13

National Association of Colleges and Business Officers -- USD is named as one of the top 25 schools that registered the highest average annual percentage changes in net assets from 2000 - 2010. (Full Story)

11.20.13

The Palm Beach Post -- This time I talked to Orly Lobel, Professor of Law at the University of San Diego and author of "Talent Wants to Be Free: Why We Should Learn to Love Raids, Leaks and Free Riding." (Full Story)

11.20.13

U-T San Diego -- "There's now a little bit of bias against people unemployed for a long time. They're in a really difficult situation," said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, also noting an indirect impact on spending. (Full Story)

11.19.13

UT-San Diego--...In the San Diego area, “the market made a comeback in 2012, and while we continue to see vacancy rates decline in all commercial sectors, the overall leasing activity . . . seems to be slowing from what we observed in 2012,” said Dr. Norm Miller, a professor of real estate at the University of San Diego’s Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate. (Full Story)

11.19.13

UT-San Diego--...Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said the region isn’t generally thought of as a tourist destination for history buffs, such as Boston. They come to San Diego for the weather, natural beauty and SeaWorld. But if there are historical attractions that pique their interest, they may not leave as quickly.

“If you can get them to stay and visit these things, they might add a day or two to trips,” Gin said, noting that’s more money to restaurants and hotels. (Full Story)

11.15.13

U-T San Diego -- “All that conserving of cash and cutting costs meant little extra in the way of infrastructure in the ground, permits in process and projects and entitlements,” Fischer said at the Women in Real Estate conference at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

11.15.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said coastal California is expensive because people want to live here but there’s a limited supply of land since the ocean serves as a barrier to expansion. (Full Story)

11.11.13

UT-San Diego--

...“The main reasons that businesses have their information stolen is that they have either little, lax or nonexistent security policies,” said Dr. Carl Rebman, associate professor of Information Systems and Information at the University of San Diego...(Full Story)

11.10.13

The Insighters Scholars Circle--

...David Shirk is Associate Professor of Political Science and International, and Director of the Justice in Mexico Project, at University of San Diego. He has co-authored, Drug Violence in Mexico: Data and Analysis Through 2013, Armed with Impunity: Curbing Military Human Rights Abuses in Mexico, and Contemporary Mexican Politics...  (Full Story)

11.06.13

UT- San Diego--California efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions will come under review Friday, at the fifth annual Climate and Energy Law Symposium hosted by the University Of San Diego School Of Law. (Full Story)

11.06.13

St. John Source--Thanks to a $76,000 grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a study by a researcher from the University of San Diego on how sedimentation impacts coral reefs will continue on St. John.

San Diego marine sciences professor Sarah Gray started looking at sedimentation in the waters around St. John in 2007. While that work will continue with this grant, she said it also covers work by Carlos Ramos-Scharron of the University of Texas at Austin, who Gray said studies the runoff that enters each watershed impacting Coral Harbor.

(Full Story)

11.05.13

U-T San Diego -- In an article about the concept of “administrative evil,” University of San Diego associate dean George Reed describes a bus driver who diligently picks up passengers and delivers them to their destination each day. (Full Story

10.31.13

UT-San Diego--

...Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said increasing auto sales are a sign of confidence in the economy.

"Usually people can't pay cash for cars," he said. "It involves some sort of loan, and you're not going to take on loans if you're worried about your financial or economic situation."

Gin said he believes the recent federal government shut down and furlough of civilian employees may have put off some sales over the past month, but those would be made up in the future as the workers receive their back pay... (Full Story)

10.30.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

Some aspects of the rollout of Obamacare have gone well, such as parents’ insurance coverage of children under 26, the narrowing of the Medicare Part D “donut hole,” coverage of more people through the expansion of Medicaid, complete coverage of preventative services, and the ban on lifetime coverage limits and exclusions for pre-existing conditions. (Full Story

10.24.13

CNBC-- ...Sun Capital has hit like a bomb in the private equity industry, notes Victor Fleischer, professor of law at the University of San Diego and a DealBook contributor. Showing how serious tax experts take this, Tax Notes, the leading tax publication, ran a series of articles on the case and private equity in a recent issue...(Full Story)

10.22.13

U-T San Diego -- Foreclosures and defaults in San Diego County continued to fall, sinking to seven-year lows in September, DataQuick reported Monday.

The trend line, according to University of San Diego real estate economist Norm Miller, points to normalcy in 2014. (Full Story

10.21.13

UT-San Diego-- ..."The expansion of the Convention Center has a big economic impact because it allows more and bigger conventions to be held. This brings in money from outside of the region and has a big impact on the local economy. While the Chargers do bring in some money from the outside and there is the possibility of future Super Bowls, a lot of the funds involved are a recirculation of money already in the region, which has less of an impact. There are other infrastructure projects that would give a boost to the economy or simply improve the lives of San Diegans, such as street repair." --Alan Gin 

(Full Story)

10.21.13

Marketplace-- If you’re looking to book a hotel room for next summer’s World Cup in Brazil, look out. Prices at some hotels have risen 500 percent for World Cup season. Brazil’s president Dilma Rousseff is setting up a committee to head off price gouging. But what is price gouging, exactly? “It’s hard to pin point exactly where price increases stop being the normal operations of the marketplace and start being something morally problematic,” says Matt Zwolinski, who teaches philosophy at the University of San Diego... (Full story)

10.18.13

U-T San Diego -- When that issue starts making news again, its timing will come when consumer spending should be in high gear, said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

10.14.13

U-T San Diego -- “It’s like there’s a little cloud hanging over the Cabrillo National Monument,” said Iris Engstrand, a University of San Diego history professor. “It’s never been exactly what it should have been.” (Full Story

10.14.13

NerdWallet -- In Talent Wants to Be Free: Why We Should Learn to Love Leaks, Raids and Free Riding, University of San Diego Law Professor Orly Lobel relies on original behavioral experiments and case study analyses to argue against conventional notions about competition, innovation and secrecy. She posits that looser control of ideas and talent flow will spur innovation and creativity. (Full Story)

10.14.13

NerdWallet Investing--Government leaders and CEOs want to create innovative environments. But what if the traditional approach to innovation is wrong? In the traditional approach to innovation, companies invest heavily in R&D departments and protect their ideas through patents, lawsuits and non-compete contracts. Companies can only profit from ideas—the thinking goes—when no one else has them. In Talent Wants to Be Free: Why We Should Learn to Love Leaks, Raids and Free Riding, University of San Diego Law Professor Orly Lobel relies on original behavioral experiments and case study analyses to argue against conventional notions about competition, innovation and secrecy. She posits that looser control of ideas and talent flow will spur innovation and creativity.(Full Story)

10.09.13

U-T San Diego -- In 2001, power cost 13 cents per kilowatt hour in Tier 1 and rose to 19 cents in Tier 4 for residential customers of San Diego Gas & Electric Co., according to a recent paper by Scott Anders, director of the Energy Policy Initiatives Center at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

10.08.13

U-T San Diego-- ...“San Diego has never been a major manufacturing center,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “It’s too expensive to make stuff here.”

But, companies do make things here. On Friday, San Diegans learned about beer, paddle boards, guitars, airplane parts and a company that makes prototypes of electronics... (Full Story)

10.08.13

NBC San Diego--As the new common core curriculum standards begin working their way into schools, teachers and parents share their thoughts on whether it will work for students. NBC 7's Education Reporter Rory Devine reports

Interview with Scott Himelstein

(Watch Video)

10.08.13

SD Metro--The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has awarded a $300,000, three-year grant to the University of San Diego to launch a comprehensive suicide prevention program. The grant will allow the university to enhance and strengthen collaborations, trainings and other educational interventions, including increasing the awareness of mental health concerns, suicide risk and create environmental change on campus and beyond that promotes the overall health of the USD community. (Full Story)

10.04.13

U-T San Diego -- If federal dollars stop flowing for an extended period, the defense contracting industry could be in for a “big impact,” said Alan Gin, an associate professor of economics at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

10.04.13

U-T San Diego-- ..."The shutdown won’t cause lasting harm to the recovery, but it will slow it. San Diego will be impacted more than most metropolitan areas because we get more money from the federal government than other places..." (Full Story)- Alan Gin

9.30.13

U-T San Diego-- ..."Earlier this year, San Diego was on a pace to add more than 30,000 jobs to the county’s economy, which would have made 2013 the best year for job growth since 2000. But August’s year-over-year growth was less than 15,000 compared to August 2012. San Diego came out of the Great Recession later but stronger than the rest of the economy, and the slowdown may just be a consolidation of some of those early gains. The slowdown could also be a sign that the sequester is having a strong effect on San Diego, given the dependence of the military and some parts of the sciences on federal funding" -Alan Gin...

(Full Story)

9.30.13

U-T San Diego-- ...With planter boxes full of fresh herbs on the patio and an Organic Soyrizo Tofu Scramble special on the menu, the University of San Diego’s recently remodeled La Paloma Cafe seemed like the perfect place to start my day. If I had spare time by the bushel and willpower by the pound. (Full Story)

9.25.13

U-T San Diego -- Students at the University of San Diego kicked off a campaign for immigration reform and are hosting a series of events on Wednesday that include a mass, vigil and a march to the campus chapel. (Full Story

9.23.13

U-T San Diego-Altobello currently has a perform rating on the security. He said regular WD-40 is as strong as ever, but that the company is branching out into more international territories and it is finding niches with new, targeted products. (Full Story)

Garry Ridge earned his master of science in executive leadership degree from USD in 2001. He received the Author E. Hughes Award for Career Achievement, from the School of Business Administration in 2004. 

 

9.23.13

The Washington Post-UNITED NATIONS — As President Obama weighed his options last month in response to the use of chemical weapons in Syria, he made clear that he was prepared to bypass the United Nations on the way to war. (Full Story)

9.23.13

UT San Diego- ...The case “in my view is an illustration of why Mexico needs reform,” said David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego and director of the Justice in Mexico Project, a research initiative on security and rule of law in Mexico. “These are questions that are being raised some 30 years after the fact that should have been raised at the time of the arrest.” (Full Story

9.23.13

Reuters- ..."The main question in my mind is, 'do they know what they're doing?'" said David Shirk, director of the Trans-Border Institute and a drug war specialist, calling the gendarmerie a "gimmick."

"Do they have a well thought-out strategy that they're trying to employ? Or are they figuring out things as they go?" (Full Story)

9.22.13

U-T San Diego- ...The situation exasperates Susan Lord, an engineering professor at USD. Using her fingers to tick things off, Lord said, “Law, medicine, science — women have made progress in all of these areas. But not in engineering." (Full Story)

9.19.13

U-T San Diego- The number of people living in poverty and the median household income in the San Diego region stayed virtually the same between 2011 and 2012 despite some improvements in the economy, according to new census data. (Full Story)

9.17.13

Nonprofit Quarterly- It’s important for nonprofits to advocate on behalf of their causes and weigh in on important public policy issues and community challenges, but a recent development in the drama over former San Diego mayor Bob Filner shows that nonprofit leaders need to be careful about how it’s done and mindful of the rules and regulations governing nonprofit advocacy. (Full Story)

9.17.13

ESPN W.- It just makes sense for there to be great volleyball played in San Diego, right? Well, this year, the University of San Diego women's volleyball team indeed might be on a path to greatness. If nothing else, the Toreros certainly have had a great start to their 2013 season. (Full Story)

 

9.17.13

Engineering News Record-Chell A. Roberts is named founding dean of the Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering at the University of San Diego (USD), Calif., which will be formally inaugurated on Sept. 26. He had been executive dean of the College of Technology and Innovation at Arizona State University, Tempe, and also served as its engineering chair. (Full Story)

9.10.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

July Is usually the worst month of the year for the unemployment rate due to new graduates coming on the market as well as school support personnel being let go for the summer. (Full Story

8.22.13

KPBS — Tom Reifer, associate professor of sociology and affiliated faculty for Ethnic Studies at the University of San Diego appeared on KPBS’ Midday Edition at noon and on KPBS TV at 5 p.m. to discuss San Diego Mayor Bob Filner. Also appearing on both shows was Carl Luna, a visiting political science professor at USD, and professor at San Diego Mesa College.

KPBS Midday Edition 

KPBS TV video

8.22.13

KPBS Midday Edition — University of San Diego sociologist Thomas Reifer said the new policy is disturbing because of the human rights issue, but also for another reason.

(full story)

8.18.13

U.K. Sky News — Carl Luna, a visiting political professor at University of San Diego, said politicians are learning some hard lessons about the impact of scandals.

(full story)

8.16.13

Cardhub.com — Still, foreclosures offer would-be homeowners and investors an attractive opportunity, as long as you are careful. The experts, including Norman G. Miller, professor for the University of San Diego’s Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate, offer advice on staying out of trouble. (Full story)

8.11.13

 

U-T San Diego -- USD economists Norm Miller and Alan Gin agreed that Janet Yellen, vice chairwoman of the Federal Reserve, is the best replacement for Chairman Ben Bernanke. (Full Story)

8.08.13

U-T San Diego -- That would cut the number of home sales in most markets, according to research by Norm Miller, a professor at the University of San Diego’s Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate. (Full Story

8.07.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said he wasn't surprised by the study’s findings, noting that the U.S. economy has become more service oriented. (Full Story

8.07.13

U-T San Diego -- Shelley Hawkins, director of the Advanced Practice Nurse Practitioner Program at the University of San Diego, said many other states have put similar independent practice laws in place with no negative consequences. (Full Story

8.05.13

Sacramento Bee -- "The border has never been more secure than it is now. The level of enforcement is unprecedented," said David Shirk, associate professor of political science and international relations at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

8.05.13

U-T San Diego -- Question: Excluding any city budget impact, is there an economic price to pay for the continuing Filner sexual harassment scandal?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Annswer: No

The story is national and international news now, so most business people considering doing business in San Diego have heard of it. (Full Story

7.29.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

A lot of tourists would come here even without advertising. People know about the desirability of San Diego in terms of the weather and things to do, perhaps from past experience. (Full Story

7.26.13

USA Today -- Those admissions alone warrant his resignation, said Lori Watson, director of the women's and gender studies program at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

7.23.13

KPBS -- Economist Alan Gin of the University of San Diego said a spike in diesel consumption is a good thing for the state. (Full Story

7.19.13

U-T San Diego -- Those push-and-pull dynamics and declining distressed-housing stock have contributed to a market that’s “close to equilibrium,” said Norm Miller, a real estate professor at the University of San Diego’s Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate. (Full Story

7.19.13

Catholic News Service -- Speaking during the teleconference, Mary Lyons, president of the University of San Diego, observed that her institution is just 15 miles from the Mexican border, the only U.S. Catholic school within that short a distance. Any immigration reform, or the failure to pass it, will have an effect on the university's students and their families. (Full Story

7.17.13

U-T San Diego -- "I think it’s virtually impossible," said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. "California's economy has a little bit of momentum behind it and especially in the recovery in the housing market." (Full Story

7.09.13

U-T San Diego -- “The recovery has been slow and uneven,” said Alan Gin of the University of San Diego. (Full Story

7.08.13

U-T San Diego -- The reformist John XXIII, who was pope from 1958 until his death in 1963, was hailed by University of San Diego Msgr. Dan Dillabough for convening the Second Vatican Council and modernizing the church. (Full Story

7.08.13

The Daily Transcript -- Alan Gin, a professor at the University of San Diego and the author of the monthly index of leading economic indicators for San Diego County, said the most recent report showed, “the firing front was more positive, with the local unemployment rate decreased to 6.7 percent in May, the first time it has dropped below 7.0 percent since November 2008. That compares to 8.8 percent in May 2012.” (Full Story

7.08.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

With no change in the total amount spent compared to the old enterprise zone program, the impact is likely to be small, but still positive. (Full Story

7.02.13

U-T San Diego -- “This is clearly a historic moment in our nation’s immigration history, since the Senate bill is the closest we have come to a comprehensive immigration reform in many years,” said David Shirk, associate professor of political science at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

7.02.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

Growth in the Chinese economy has helped pull the global economy through the Great Recession. (Full Story

6.24.13

NBC Bay Area -- The fight over money undoubtedly has a ripple effect throughout the drug smuggling business, observers said. When U.S. attorneys set weight thresholds for drug prosecution, traffickers immediately start smuggling smaller loads, said David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego and an expert on drug trafficking. (Full Story

6.24.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

While there is positive growth in the economy, there is a long way to go before full recovery is achieved. (Full Story

6.19.13

The Daily Beast -- When U.S. attorneys set weight thresholds for drug prosecution, traffickers immediately start smuggling smaller loads, said David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego and an expert on drug trafficking. (Full Story) 

6.17.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

I don’t believe in trying to trade the stocks, so I would not advocate completely exiting the market, even though a correction is possible. (Full Story

6.13.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, said he believes the local economy is recovering solidly. (Full Story

6.13.13

U-T San Diego -- “In developing countries, it’s always more of a challenge,” said Michel Boudrias, a professor of marine science and environmental studies and director of sustainability for the University of San Diego.

... Despite disagreements about global feasibility and economic hardships, Dave De Haan, a University of San Diego chemistry professor who has researched particulate pollution, said the new report leaves little doubt about the need to rein in diesel emissions. (Full Story

 

6.10.13

U-T San Diego -- Scott Himelstein, director for the Center for Education Policy and Law at the University of San Diego

Gov. Brown’s plan represents a terrific opportunity to re-engage parents, business and students in how school districts determine priorities and expend resources. (Full Story

6.10.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego 

Answer: No

Since reaching a low in May 2009, home prices have risen almost 15 percent, according to the Case-Shiller Home Price Index. (Full Story

6.03.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

For the first time in almost a decade, the state of California has a budget surplus. (Full Story

 

5.28.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

The Great Recession was the worst downturn since the Great Depression, and drastic action needed to be taken. (Full Story

5.28.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, said the state is rebounding rapidly because it took such a large hit during The Great Recession. Now, it's making up for it. (Full Story

5.20.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

San Diego has too many problems with its transportation infrastructure to allow it to ever become a big player on the export front. (Full Story

5.20.13

Huffington Post -- University of San Diego law professor Gail Heriot told CNN that "the problem is what is called mismatch." (Full Story

5.17.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, said there's some bias in the job market against people who have been unemployed for a long-time. (Full Story

5.13.13

U-T San Diego -- Leach and co-lead investigator Ann M. Mayo, RN, DNSc, professor in the Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science at the University of San Diego, conducted in-depth interviews with individual RRT members and observed teams in action to collect data for their analysis. (Full Story

5.13.13

U-T San Diego -- One problem with the Heritage Foundation report is that it uses static analysis and doesn’t fully take into account the positive impact of immigration reform on the economy. (Full Story

5.13.13

The New York Times -- “People here tend to think about ourselves as the edge of the Earth, as if there’s nothing beyond the border,” said Denise Moreno Ducheny, a former state senator and an analyst at the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (full story)

5.07.13

Bloomberg Businessweek -- The inaugural first-place individual finisher, Daniel McAllister, is an MBA candidate at the University of San Diego and a former financial analyst for Jack in the Box (JACK), the San Diego-based quick-service restaurant company. (Full Story

5.06.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

It would level the playing field between the traditional brick-and-mortar retailers and the online ones. (Full Story

5.06.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, said the unemployment rate is still high enough where employers have the advantage in the job market and can find people willing to take fewer hours. (Full Story

4.29.13

U-T San Diego -- Speaking with intense somberness, Derrick Cartwright describes the renowned “Miserere” series as a “monumental” group of 58 etchings the French artist Georges Rouault created in response to the unspeakable horrors of World War I.

Cartwright, director of University of San Diego Galleries and an art history professor, considers this unfinished yet deeply moving body of work one of the most important expressions of 20th-century printmaking. (full story)

4.27.13

U-T San Diego -- Scott Himelstein, Director for the Center for Education Policy and Law at the University of San Diego

The more “complex” tests are being piloted and yet to be approved. It remains to be seen how quickly the new system will be fully operational. (full story)

4.26.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

ANSWER: YES

With the U.S. economy moving away from an industrial economy to one that is more knowledge-based, increasing importance will be put on the creation of intellectual property. (Full Story)

4.25.13

KPBS -- Carl Luna, a visiting political professor at University of San Diego, stopped while on his way to class one busy afternoon to talk about San Diego mayors. (Full Story

4.24.13

ABC News -- "It's one thing to have data coming from a drone; It's another thing to be able to respond to it," said David Shirk, an expert on border security at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

4.22.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said if the 30,000-plus pace keeps up by the end of the year, it would be the fastest job growth since 2000 and could force the unemployment rate below 7 percent. (Full Story

4.22.13

U-T San Diego -- University of San Diego lecturer Pete Nunez said Friday that it is doubtful the brothers’ Chechen ties were a factor in the attacks, considering the U.S. was not heavily involved in the conflicts in Chechnya. (Full Story

4.15.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said at first the change would be minimal, but would become more noticeable over time. (Full Story

4.15.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

Social Security is not currently adding to the deficit. (Full Story

4.09.13

U-T San Diego -- As recently reported in this newspaper, a University of San Diego study revealed firearms bought in the U.S. and smuggled into Mexico is a $127 million a year business for the gun industry. (Full Story

4.09.13

San Diego Business Journal -- Douglas Burke, the Director of Network, Infrastructure, Systems and Services, University of San Diego, and his team have made USD one of the most “virtualized” institutions of higher education in the country. (Full Story

4.09.13

The National -- In other words, the technologies are not responding to the tensions before they escalate into violence, but trying to minimise violence if an incidence occurs, says Zahra Ismail, a programme officer at the Institute for Peace & Justice at the University of San Diego's School of Peace Studies. (Full Story

4.09.13

U-T San Diego -- One chapter, “Drugs, Crime and Violence,” written by University of San Diego professor David Shirk together with Luis Astorga of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, urges that the United States and Mexico lead a hemisphere-wide campaign to reduce drug demand. (Full Story

4.09.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

San Diego is a center for scientific research and development, so any additional funding in that area will benefit the local economy. (Full Story

4.03.13

The Yakima Herald -- David Shirk, of the University of San Diego’s Trans-Border Institute, said there is a dearth of reliable intelligence that cartels are dispatching operatives from Mexico on a large scale. “We know astonishingly little about the structure and dynamics of cartels north of the border,” Shirk said. “We need to be very cautious about the assumptions we make.” (Full Story)

4.02.13

Huffington Post -- David Shirk, of the University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute, said there is a dearth of reliable intelligence that cartels are dispatching operatives from Mexico on a large scale. (Full Story

4.01.13

Fox News Latino -- David Shirk, of the University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute, said there is a dearth of reliable intelligence that cartels are dispatching operatives from Mexico on a large scale. (Full Story

4.01.13

U-T San Diego -- “This is a sign that the local economy is in pretty good shape in terms of growth,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

4.01.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Yes. 2012 was a good year for job growth; even after the annual benchmarking of data, job growth for the year was more than 25,000, the largest increase since 2000. (Full Story

4.01.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

While housing prices have increased, they are still far from the post-crash highs. (Full Story

4.01.13

Fox News -- David Shirk, of the University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute, said there is a dearth of reliable intelligence that cartels are dispatching operatives from Mexico on a large scale.

"We know astonishingly little about the structure and dynamics of cartels north of the border," Shirk said. "We need to be very cautious about the assumptions we make." (Full Story)

 

3.21.13

Bloomberg Businessweek -- Such special allocations reflect the different economic circumstances of multiple properties inside a single partnership and the varying contributions and levels of risk to individual partners, said Karen Burke, a tax law professor at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

3.20.13

Yahoo! News -- "People find cellphone conversations annoying — survey results indicate that up to 82 percent of people do," Veronica Galván, a cognitive psychologist at the University of San Diego, told TechNewsDaily. "We were curious to see what cognitive effects overhearing cellphone conversations might have, since they are now so pervasive in everyday life." (Full Story

3.20.13

Wired -- “We thought it would be interesting to see, since people consider them annoying and distracting, whether they have any impact on attention and memory,” said Veronica Galvan of the University of San Diego, lead author of findings published March 13 in PLoS One. (Full Story

3.20.13

MSN -- "There is a period of silence in the cellphone conversation … and the brain wants to understand, 'Why is that person saying that and what context is there for this conversation?'" Veronica Galvan, assistant professor of psychology at the University of San Diego, told CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks in an interview that airs Saturday. (Full Story

3.19.13

FOX News Latino -- "The reality is that a lot of Mexicans have sort of given up looking for work in the U.S. and have started to return home,” said David Shirk, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

 

3.18.13

The New York Times -- “Of all the national churches in Latin America, Argentina is where ties were closest between the clergy and the military,” said Kenneth P. Serbin, a historian at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

3.18.13

U-T San Diego -- Marie Simovich, a biology professor with the University of San Diego, said she brings students to the park during spring break, and said the new center will allow them to explore the area more easily. (Full Story

3.15.13

Voice of America -- At the University of San Diego, law student Rosibel Mancillas Lopez meets with a friend, Wendy Romero. Wendy is one of 1.7 million young people covered by the program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which the Obama administration announced last June. She is now safe from deportation. (Full Story

3.14.13

The Washington Post -- “He is a theologian and represents the views of the Vatican, but he’s also coming from a social reality where there is a marked difference from what the church actually teaches,” Kenneth Serbin, a University of San Diego historian whose research has focused on the Brazilian Catholic church. (Full Story

3.14.13

U-T San Diego -- The new coalition will have to provide details on how to halt incentives that encourage illegal immigration if it wants to influence Congress, said Peter Nunez, a former U.S. attorney and a lecturer on immigration policy at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

3.13.13

Think Progress -- “Patriotism came to be associated with Catholicism,” said Kenneth P. Serbin, a history professor at the University of San Diego who has written about the Roman Catholic Church in South America. (Full Story

3.13.13

Reuters -- David Shirk, the director of the University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute, said that it is hard to say whether border security will be significantly compromised by the budget cuts known as "sequestration" because multiple factors are at play. (Full Story

3.11.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, said the report was good, but said 250,000 to 300,000 in monthly growth would really put a hit on the jobless rate. (Full Story

3.11.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

The benefits to employers include less need for office space, the ability to employ workers (particularly parents with children) who otherwise would not be able to work outside the home, improved employee morale, and reduced employee turnover. (Full Story

3.11.13

Huffington Post -- "That region has produced many of the best leaders of the Brazilian church over the past 30 or 40 years. It is one of the most dynamic areas in terms of producing priestly vocations, nuns and other religious personnel," said Kenneth Serbin, chair of the University of San Diego history department whose research has focused on the church in Brazil. (Full Story

3.08.13

ABC News -- "That region has produced many of the best leaders of the Brazilian church over the past 30 or 40 years. It is one of the most dynamic areas in terms of producing priestly vocations, nuns and other religious personnel," said Kenneth Serbin, chair of the University of San Diego history department whose research has focused on the church in Brazil. (Full Story

3.07.13

U-T San Diego -- “The economy is better now than it was a year ago,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “We have more jobs, so as a result car sales are going to be up.” (Full Story

3.06.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, Economist at the University of San Diego

"There's a disconnect now between what companies are doing and how the population is feeling. What companies have done is they've cut back on workers, streamlined operations, held down wages. That's what's made them profitable. They're making profits but the general population is not viewing it." (Full Story

3.04.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

Even though the economy is growing, the pace of the growth is very slow and the unemployment rate remains high. (Full Story

3.04.13

Coronado Eagle and Journal -- Historic preservation is important for the economic health of our island. University of San Diego economics professor and Equinox Foundation expert advisor Andrew Narwold has shown irrefutable evidence that a large inventory of historic homes has positive, long-term economic consequences for our city. (Full Story

3.01.13

KFMB San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, said he didn't think the price increase would affect demand for gasoline, but said it would gradually hit consumer spending. (Full Story) 

2.21.13

Los Angeles Times -- In the last six years, 45 mayors and former mayors have been killed in Mexico, according to the University of San Diego’s Trans-Border Institute. (Full Story) 

2.20.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, a University of San Diego economist, said San Diego has not had a sizable increase in heavy industrial or infrastructure spending, but any increase in the local contract backlog may be tied to declining office vacancies and a rising demand for new space. (Full Story

2.19.13

The New York Times -- The bloodshed continued despite some indications that the violence leveled off last year, according to a report released on Feb. 5 by the University of San Diego’s Trans-Border Institute, which analyzed a range of government homicide statistics. (Full Story

2.18.13

U-T San Diego -- That transfer of authority will have a more significant day-to-day impact on the local church and its parishioners than the papal switch, said Msgr. Dan Dillabough, vice president for mission and ministry at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

2.18.13

The Voice of San Diego -- David Shirk, director of the University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute, zeroed in on Filner's technological proposals.

Video conferencing or walkie-talkies that endure during disasters would be more effective than a desk phone that connects the two mayors, Shirk said. (Full Story

 

2.13.13

U-T San Diego -- “There’s a significant amount going on globally, as it relates to using gaming systems or methodologies to improve student achievement,” said Shawn Gross, director of technology and innovation for the University of San Diego’s Mobile Technology Learning Center. (Full Story

2.11.13

U-T San Diego -- University of San Diego real estate professor Norm Miller said the average discount for a foreclosure compared to a regular sale in 2012 was 14 percent. In 2008, it was 35 percent. (Full Story

2.11.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

Texas has an advantage in energy-related industries and low value-added jobs, the latter due to lower land and labor costs (median household income is 17% less than California’s and the proportion making the minimum wage or less is five times greater). (Full Story

 

2.08.13

Bloomberg Businessweek -- “Depending on what the rule is, there might be so much wiggle room in the valuation that it won’t be as useful,” said Frank Partnoy, a professor of law and finance at the University of San Diego who previously structured derivatives at Morgan Stanley, in a telephone interview. (Full Story

2.07.13

U-T San Diego -- “Anyone who has ever been in love with someone in the era of letters knows it tickles you when you get a letter from someone you love,” said Esteban del Rio, associate professor of communication studies at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

2.04.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, said the revision shows a movement toward a desired 200,000 to 250,000 monthly average, which he said would start to really knock down the unemployment rate. (Full Story

2.01.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

One aspect of the proposal calls for improved border security, which would mean more jobs for border agents and a boost to San Diego companies specializing in security technology. (Full Story

1.28.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

A longer extension would have been better, but this gives Congress some time to come to an agreement. (Full Story

1.23.13

The Daily Transcript -- Alan Gin, an economics professor at the University of San Diego, agreed. He is forecasting the region could add as many as 30,000 new jobs in 2013. (Full Story

1.23.13

The Coast News -- Alan Gin, an economist with the University of San Diego, noted that the report isn’t seasonally adjusted. As such, the county’s rate is actually closer to 8.7 percent. (Full Story

1.22.13

Sacramento Bee -- Shaun Martin, a law professor at the University of San Diego, said a key criminal statute that may have been violated is Penal Code section 424. (Full Story

1.10.13

Voice of San Diego -- But the tide may be changing, said David Shirk, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

1.09.13

NPR -- Opponents worry that the class will be adopted in schools across the nation. They point to the Jois Foundation's funding of researchers at the Universities of San Diego and Virginia to study whether the yoga classes affect things like attendance, behavior and student achievement. (Full Story

1.07.13

U-T San Diego -- His character is resonating with Americans today as the country grapples with issues of economy, war and torture, said Tom Reifer, a race and freedom scholar who teaches sociology at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

1.07.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin at the University of San Diego said the national job production rate fell in line with what occurred through all of 2012. (Full Story

1.07.13

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

I expect the GDP growth rate will be higher and the unemployment rate lower in 2013 than in 2012. (Full Story

1.03.13

KPBS -- David Shirk, director of the University of San Diego’s Trans-Border Institute, called the general the “unsung hero” of Tijuana’s improved security situation. (Full Story

1.03.13

U-T San Diego -- University of San Diego economist Alan Gin agreed, particularly when it comes to housing in San Diego County.

"I think that took out a lot of uncertainty," he said of the tax measure. (Full Story

1.02.13

New York Magazine -- This is the main triumph of the Mexican drug war, but it may itself reflect an unintentional compromise. David Shirk, who is the director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego, believes that the pattern of violence in Tijuana doesn’t support the official narrative of a slow triumph of the police over the gangs. (Full Story

12.31.12

San Diego Catholic Worker -- Tom Reifer is a professor of sociology at the University of San Diego.

I was born in Spanish-Harlem in 1967, to heroin-addicted parents, though raised behind the Orange Curtain, the border of Orange and Los Angeles counties, where I grew up in a household whose only certainty was the apocalyptic violence and torture that came with being physically attacked, assaulted and strangled over and over again. In 1980, when I was 13 years old, I got up the courage to run away from home. (Full Story

12.21.12

Network World -- Robert C. Fellmeth, founder and executive director of the University of San Diego's Center for Public Interest Law said earlier in the week he wanted that Instagram should seek consent in advance from parents in each case before using information posted online by a child in advertisements. (Full Story

12.20.12

U-T San Diego -- “There are a number of religions that promise an ecstatic afterlife, and there are other religions that promise a better rebirth, so there is this promise of something better coming after the world ends,” said Evelyn Kirkley, associate professor of theology and religions studies at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

12.18.12

U-T San Diego -- “Because of the economy, nonprofits are doing more with less and are being smart about how they are going about doing business,” said Carole Fish, a professor at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

12.18.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego 

Answer: Yes

Unions are needed because there has been a big shift in power from workers to companies and management. Because of that, wages and salaries as a share of GDP fell to 43.5 percent in the third quarter, the lowest level on record, while corporate profits were 11.1 percent, the highest percentage ever. (Full Story

12.18.12

U-T San Diego -- “This doesn’t fit any pattern of autism or Asperger’s that any of us know of,” said Anne Donnellan, director of the Autism Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

12.14.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, said he didn’t know how much the uncertainty would translate to fewer sales. (Full Story

12.14.12

Fronteras -- But Octavio Rodriguez with University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute said despite the possible duress, smuggling is still a crime. (Full Story

12.10.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, called it a fairly good report. He said while the labor force did get smaller, the U-6 rate — which includes people who want a job but aren’t looking and part-timers who can’t find full-time work — dropped from 14.6 to 14.4. (Full Story

12.10.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego 

Answer: No

It makes sense to replace the dollar bill with a coin, but it has not been successful when it has been tried in the past. (Full Story

12.06.12

The Kansas City Star -- “She does have that point guard mentality; the driver, the catalyst. She wants to be the one out front pushing the agenda and driving the body forward,” said Ed Luck, dean of the University of San Diego’s Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies, a former special adviser to the United Nations secretary-general and a Rice fan. “I’m sure, through the years, her more abusive side has stuck with some people.” (Full Story)

 

12.04.12

The Washington Post -- All eyes on Susan Rice now that she’s presumptive front-runner to become secretary of state.

“She’s not a typical diplomat,” says Ed Luck, a former special adviser to the U.N. secretary-general. “She doesn’t suffer fools gladly, and I don’t see why she should.”

11.30.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

Although the unemployment rate has dropped, it is still high by historic standards. (Full Story

11.30.12

Fox News Latino -- Ami Carpenter, associate professor in the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies at the University of San Diego, said the international implications of cross-border shootings are profound. (Full Story

11.29.12

U-T San Diego -- Potential buyers in certain ZIP codes are fighting for a limited supply of homes, sparked by fewer foreclosures and a high share of underwater homeowners who can’t put their homes on the market, said Norm Miller, real estate professor at the University of San Diego’s Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate. (Full Story

11.27.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, said losing the checks could also hurt the economy because people generally spend most of the money on necessities. (Full Story

11.27.12

North County Times -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, said losing the checks could also hurt the economy because people generally spend most of the money on necessities. (Full Story

11.27.12

U-T San Diego -- "Gov. Jerry Brown appointed San Diego lawyer Paula S. Rosenstein to a seat on the Superior Court bench, the governor’s office announced Wednesday.

Rosenstein, 52, has been an attorney and shareholder at Rosenstein Wilson & Dean since 1997. There, she provided advice and litigation services particularly on employment-related matters, such as discrimination, sexual harassment and wrongful termination cases.

Rosenstein, a registered Democrat, has also worked as a sole practitioner, and an associate attorney at two other firms. She graduated from the University of California San Diego and received her law degree from the University of San Diego." (Full Story)

11.17.12

U-T San Diego -- "The images seem like something from a gory Halloween event: a raised machete, a bloodied face, a severed arm. But these photos, in an exhibit at the University of San Diego’s Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace & Justice, are part of an eyewitness account of post-election violence in Kenya following their last elections in 2007." (Full Story)

11.12.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego 

Answer: Extend the debt ceiling

I think that extending the debt ceiling cleanly would help the recovery immensely. (Full Story

11.05.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

The national economy is in better shape than it was in four years ago. (Full Story

11.02.12

KPBS -- An index of San Diego County's leading economic indicators rose 0.6 percent in September, compared to 0.1 percent decline in August, according to figures released today by the University of San Diego Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate today. (Full Story

10.29.12

FARC -- Milburn Line of the Institute Peace and Justice at the University of San Diego warned that a "negative peace" is the likely goal of the process. "Negative peace is just ending the fighting," he said. "Positive peace is actually addressing the causes of conflict. (Full Story

10.29.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

The charge is that China is manipulating its currency by keeping it lower in value than what would occur in a free market. (Full Story

10.29.12

Voice of San Diego -- “Yes, San Diego got a park in 1868,” said University of San Diego law professor Nancy Carol Carter, “but from that day forward the question of whether or not we can keep it has been on the table.” (Full Story

10.26.12

Columbia Reports -- “Negative peace is just ending the fighting. Positive peace is actually addressing the causes of conflict,” explained Milburn Line of the Institute Peace and Justice at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

10.23.12

KYMA News 11-- "This is not going to release any prisoners. It’s simply going to keep people who otherwise might have been sentenced to death to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole," Political Science Professor of University of San Diego Virginia Lewis said. (Full Story)

10.23.12

KPBS-- “It’s based on a presumption that more arrests and stiffer penalties are going to decrease the levels of trafficking,” said Ami Carpenter, a University of San Diego professor and member of a commission that advises San Diego County on the problem of sex trafficking. (Full Story)

10.22.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, said the declining year-over-year trend doesn’t concern him because 28,000 is still strong. (Full Story

10.22.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

If people have a choice of watching the game for free at home or paying to see the game in person, most people will choose the former, which would hurt attendance. (Full Story

 

10.19.12

The XII Project -- Milburn Line, Executive Director of the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice at the University of San Diego, joins the XII Project, from San Diego, to speak about the nascent peace talks currently underway in Colombia between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). (Full Story

10.18.12

U-T San Diego -- "That’s really good news," said Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego. "Car sales are important economically. They're big ticket items that would suggest people have some confidence." (Full Story

10.18.12

The Arizona Republic -- David Shirk, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego, called the judge's ruling "a legitimate legal interpretation in the absence of any higher court ruling that suggests otherwise . . . It exposes one of the many challenges of the border region that are not well captured in national law." (Full Story)

 

10.16.12

Associated Press -- The significance of the arrest will depend on what Guzman Salazar can tell authorities about her father, like whether she can provide phone numbers, said David Shirk, director of the University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute. (Full Story

10.15.12

Education News -- “Simply not credible,” said Scott Himelstein, director of the Center for Education Policy and Law at the University of San Diego. “No one would believe that in any public or private entity.”  (Full Story)

10.11.12

Baseball America-- Griffin, a former University of San Diego star, wears a Carpe Diem tattoo on his chest, and the A's definitely seized the day, just as Griffin has seized his opportunity. (Full Story)

 

10.11.12

The Washington Times-- “We will work with the governor and anyone else to ensure that this [veto of SB 1476] will not endure,” said Ed Howard, senior counsel for the Children’s Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law. (Full Story)

 

10.10.12

NBC San Diego -- According to University of San Diego profession Alan Gin, every 10-cent rise in gas prices drains $8 to $10 million dollars out of San Diego’s economy every month. (Full Story)

 

10.10.12

U-T San Diego -- The University of San Diego Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate’s Index of Leading Economic Indicators was unchanged from July to August. That means positive economic indicators such as a rise in building permits in San Diego County were canceled out by activities like a decrease in consumer confidence and stock prices of local companies.  (Full Story)

10.08.12

All Africa-- The Joan Kroc Institute of the University of San Diego in the United States of America has awarded National Cohesion and Integration Commission (NCIC) Commissioner Alice Nderitu, as a woman Peace-Maker of the Year. (Full Story)

10.08.12

U-T San Diego-- The positions that have disappeared are the ones most people would call “middle-class jobs, relatively good pay with benefits,” said Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego.  (Full Story)

10.08.12

U-T San Diego-- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

ANSWER: NO

Obama: B

Romney: Incomplete

"President Obama needed to more forcefully push the case for an additional stimulus package to to boost demand. He did correctly point out that the budget deficit was already $1 trillion plus when he took office. The lack of detail in Gov. Romney’s proposals makes it difficult to give him a grade."  (Full Story)

10.08.12

CNN-- "What we're seeing now is affirmative action is backfiring quite badly," said Gail Heriot, a law professor at the University of San Diego and a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. (Full Story)

10.05.12

Bleacher Report -- Griffin, a former Team USA alumni, rose quickly through the Oakland system after being drafted out of the University of San Diego. His 7-1 record and 3.06 ERA give the A's bright hopes about his future with the organization. (Full Story

10.05.12

The Coast News -- Pat Libby, a nationally recognized expert in the field of nonprofit governance issues and the Director of the University of San Diego’s Institute of Nonprofit Education and Research said she thought the relationship between the school board and the group sounded “odd.” (Full Story

10.04.12

North County Times-- "The San Diego County economy slipped into neutral in August, hinting at potential weakness in the job market in the coming year, according to the University of San Diego Index of Leading Economic Indicators. The index, produced by economist Alan Gin, combines 10 streams of economic data to predict changes in the number of seasonally adjusted jobs six to 12 months in the future." (Full Story)

10.04.12

KPBS News-- "The University of San Diego Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate's index's six economic indicators were mixed last month, but August's overall value was the same as July's. 

"Developers now are starting to build more," said USD Economist Alan Gin, who complied the index." (Full Story)

10.04.12

U-T San Diego-- “(Romney) is also just very personable. He is actually bringing in humor and talking a little more on our level rather than very elevated,” said Avery Johnson, a student at the University of San Diego, where she’s part of a Republican campus group. “It almost seems like Obama is very condescending, and he was talking down.”

Fellow student, Erik Skyhar, also had an upbeat assessment of Romney. “He is very confident,” Skyhar said. “I have not felt this much confidence from him as I do now … like he’s done his homework.” (Full Story)

10.01.12

U-T San Diego-- “The county is expected to gain 25,000 jobs in 2013, so the loss of 3,000 science positions would have an impact, especially since many of those are high-paying jobs,” said Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

10.01.12

U-T San Diego--Alan Gin, University of San Diego

ANSWER: YES

"Consumer confidence has the possibility of being a self-fulfilling prophecy. If consumers become more confident, they are more likely to spend money." (Full Story)

10.01.12

U-T San Diego-- David Shirk, Director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego

"First, (the policy of) deferred action notwithstanding, this is further evidence that the Obama administration is not solely deporting hardened criminals, but also breaking up families and contributing to an even tougher environment for our new immigrants." (Full Story)

10.01.12

Poway Patch-- "A big increase in residential building permits taken out in August and moderate climb in the amount of help-wanted advertising were offset by higher unemployment and declines in local stock prices, consumer confidence and the outlook for the national economy," USD professor Alan Gin said. (Full Story)

9.24.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

ANSWER: NO

"Cutting taxes is supposed to boost the economy by giving consumers more money to spend. But you can’t force people to spend money." (Full Story)

9.20.12

U-T San Diego -- University of San Diego economist Alan Gin said falling household income is symbolic of a decline in “quality jobs,” which doesn’t necessarily push people into poverty but limits their spending ability and impacts overall economic recovery. (Full Story

9.20.12

WaZillo Media -- Professor Tammy Dwyer, chair of the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, was on the web show Career Stop, talking about how to prepare for careers in chemistry. (Full Story

9.17.12

TEMECULA ---- The Law Offices of Rosenstein and Hitzeman have announced the additions of Amber Condron and Diana Malhis... Malhis's areas of practice include business transactional matters and estate planning and is a graduate of University of San Diego School of Law. (Full Story)

9.17.12

Noodls--"Back then, there were very few players in the marketplace. It was likely a very attractive proposition," said Scott Anders, the director of the University of San Diego Energy Policy Initiatives Center. (Full Story)

9.17.12

U-T San Diego-- “It’s a shame we subordinate policy and the best interests of the children to the cultural war battles,” said Bob Fellmeth, executive director of the Children’s Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law.  (Full Story)

9.17.12

Reason.Com--Michael Ramsey, a constitutional scholar and law professor at the University of San Diego, believes that the Constitution grants the president fairly broad war powers, especially in response to attacks, but even he argues that President Obama's recent Libya intervention has no Constitutional justification. (Full Story)

9.14.12

U-T San Diego -- “Back then, there were very few players in the marketplace. It was likely a very attractive proposition,” said Scott Anders, the director of the University of San Diego Energy Policy Initiatives Center. (Full Story) 

9.14.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

The Fed’s action will have some impact, particularly on the housing market. There are signs the housing market is firming, as prices are rising in many markets. (Full Story

9.13.12

U-T San Diego -- "I don’t think it’ll hurt, I’m just not sure how much impact it's going to have at this point," said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

9.11.12

U-T San Diego -- University of San Diego real estate professor Norm Miller said the transaction appears to be beneficial for Fannie and Pacifica.

"The deal is structured so that Fannie gets priority on returns and then the returns shift more to Pacifica," Miller said. (Full Story

9.10.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

Four years ago, in the fourth quarter of 2008, the Gross Domestic Product fell by 8.9 percent, the largest quarterly drop in GDP in over 50 years. (Full Story

9.07.12

U-T San Diego -- His news conference in August largely looked at a study that showed great disparities between the performance of students throughout the city depending on where they lived. The study was produced by the Center for Education Policy and Law at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

9.07.12

U-T San Diego -- “If you get less buying power in the economy that’s going to have a negative impact, particularly since the people who are unemployed tend to spend most, if not all of that money,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

9.05.12

10 News San Diego -- David Shirk, a University of San Diego professor and a director of the Trans-Border Institute, said, "There's a new tentacle to the serpent operating in Baja California -- the Sinaloa cartel. Ten years ago, there were four major cartels operating -- the Gulf cartel, the Tijuana cartel, the Sinaloa cartel and the Jurez cartel. Now down to one, Sinaloa … fighting against a new organization that used to work for Gulf, called the Zetas, a paramilitary organization." (Full Story

9.04.12

U-T San Diego -- “I think if you look at the country as a whole right now, that is the situation,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

9.04.12

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

I think the employment situation will improve in the next 12 months, both in terms of job growth and the unemployment rate. (Full Story

8.31.12

KPBS -- The University of San Diego Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate's Index of Leading Economic Indicators for San Diego County rose 0.3 percent in July over the previous month, the ninth monthly advance in a row. (Full Story

8.31.12

KPBS -- The Scripps Institution of Oceanography has partnered with the University of San Diego’s Climate Education Partners, an educational project funded in part by a National Science Foundation grant.

The project’s goal is to educate the community, government and local business on the impact of regional climate change and how to adapt. (Full Story

8.30.12

CNN -- A recent Trans-Border Institute report looks systematically at Mexico’s National Human Rights Commission’s (CNDH) filings on human rights violations. (Full Story

8.28.12

LA Times -- Travelers might want to dip into “Drug Violence in Mexico,” a recent report by The Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

8.28.12

LA Times -- Milburn Line, executive director of the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice at the University of San Diego in California, said the announcement could be "the breakthrough many Colombians and people who follow Colombia have long waited for." (Full Story

8.28.12

New York Times -- Fewer than a quarter of crimes in Mexico are reported and over all, just 2 percent result in sentences, according to a 2010 report by the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story

8.28.12

U-T San Diego -- Associate professor, Department of Political Science and International Relations, University of San Diego

The conventions are still important to America’s political process because they are the formal mechanism by which the parties nominate their presidential candidates. (Full Story

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