Robert Donmoyer

Professor

  • Leadership Studies
  • Ph.D Stanford University, Education
  • M.A. Stanford University, Political Science
  • M.S. City College of New York, Education

Robert Donmoyer received both a Ph.D. in Education and an M.A. in Political Science from Stanford University. Throughout his career he has explored the use—or, often, the lack of use—of research and evaluation findings in policymaking and practice. One line of research-utilization-related inquiry has involved developing and experimenting with a variety of innovative research and research-reporting strategies designed to increase the utility of research for practitioners and policymakers. The substantive focus of his experimentation with different modes of doing and reporting research has, more often than not, been educational leadership and educational reform. In recent years he also has focused on the nonprofit and philanthropy sector, especially this sector.

This new focus on nonprofit organizations and foundations reflects the fact that Dr. Donmoyer was a founding co-director of the Caster Family Center for Nonprofit and Philanthropic Research within the Department of Leadership Studies and is the current coordinator of the nonprofit and philanthropy specialization within the Leadership Studies doctoral program. He also has served as a consultant and/or evaluator for a number of foundations including the Rockefeller Foundation, the Rockefeller Brother’s Fund, The Getty Center for the Arts and Education, The Ball Foundation and the KnowledgeWorks Foundation.

Dr. Donmoyer has taught the following doctoral-level courses during the past two years: Inquiry and Leadership I: Conflicting Conceptions of Leadership, Knowledge, and Research; The Policymaking Process; Qualitative Research Methods; Mixed-Methods Research Design; Seminar on Nonprofit and Philanthropy Research (LEAD 579); and Leading and Learning in Cree Culture, a SOLES international course taught primarily on the Saddle Lake Reserve in Canada.

Dr. Donmoyer has published articles in research methods, educational leadership, and nonprofit/philanthropic studies journals. His most recent publication (co-authored with his wife, June Yennie-Donmoyer and Departmental colleague, Fred Galloway), “The Search for Connections Across Principal Preparation, Principal Performance, and Student Achievement,” appeared in the April 2012 issue of UCEA’s Journal of Research on Leadership Education. In addition, two other single-authored publications, “Two (Very) Different Worlds: The Cultures of Policymaking and Qualitative Research” and “Can Qualitative Researchers Answer Policymakers’ What-Works Question?” appear in recent issues of the journal Qualitative Inquiry.

Recent Publications:

Donmoyer, R. (in press). Researching leadership for social justice: Are some methods better than others. In Shields, C. and Bogotch, I. The International Handbook on Social (In)justice and Educational Leadership. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

Donmoyer, R. (2012). Two (very) different worlds: The cultures of policymaking and qualitative research. Qualitative Inquiry, 18, 9, 798-807.

Donmoyer, R. (2012). Attributing causality in qualitative research: Viable option or inappropriate aspiration? Qualitative Inquiry, 18, 8, 651-655.

Donmoyer, R. (2012). Can qualItative researchers answer policymakers' what-works question? Qualitative Inquiry, 18, 8, 662-673.

Donmoyer, R., Libby, P., McDonald, M., & Deitrick, L. (2012). Bridging the theory-practice gap in a nonprofit and philanthropic studies master's degree program. Nonprofit Management and Leadership, 23, 1, 93-104.

Donmoyer, R., Yennie-Donmoyer, J., & Galloway, F. (2012). The search for connections across principal preparation, principal preformance, and student achievement in an exemplary principal preparation program. The Journal of Research on Leadership Education, 7(1), 5-43.

Donmoyer, R. (2011, January-March). Cultural connections in leadership education and practice. The International Journal of Leadership in Education, 14(1), 119-125.

Donmoyer, R. (2011). Why writers should also be reviewers. In Rocco, T. and Hatcher, T.(Eds.), The Handbook of Scholarly Writing and Publishing. San Francisco, CA Jossey-Bass.

Donmoyer, R. and Galloway, F. (2010). Reconsidering the utility of case study designs for researching school reform in a neo-scientific era: Insights from a multi-year, mixed-methods study. Educational Administration Quarterly, 46 (1), 3-30.

Donmoyer, R. (2010). Preparing a dissertation proposal. In Calabrese, R. and Smith, P. (Eds.), The Faculty Mentor’s Wisdom: Conceptualizing, writing, and defending the dissertation. Lanham,Md: Rowman and Littlefield Education.

Donmoyer, R. (2009). Theories about theory in nonprofit and philanthropic studies. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 38(4), 710-713.

Donmoyer, R. (2009). Ethnographic research. In Kridel, C. (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Curriculum Studies. Thousand Oaks,CA: Sage

Donmoyer, R. and Yennie-Donmoyer, J. (2008). Readers Theater as a Mode of Qualitative Data Display. In Knowles, G. and Cole, A. (Eds.), The Arts in Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks,CA: Sage.

Donmoyer, R. (2008). Generalizability. In Givens, L. (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research.Thousand Oaks,CA: Sage.

Donmoyer, R. (2008). Psychological generalization. In Givens, L. (Ed.). Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Donmoyer, R. (2006). Take my Paradigm…please! The legacy of Kuhn’s construct in educational research. The International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 19(1), 11-34.

Donmoyer, R. (2005). Aesthetics. In S. Mathison(Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Evaluation. Thousand Oaks,CA: Sage Publications.

Donmoyer R. (2005). Artistic evaluation. In S. Mathison(Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Evaluation. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Donmoyer, R. and Garcia, J. (2005). Systemic reform up close (and in the trenches): A multi-year case study of an outlier school. Theory and Research in Educational Administration.

Garcia, J. and Donmoyer, R. (2005). Rethinking technical assistance for low performing schools: Insights from the collaborative inquiry project. Theory into Practice.