Student Outcomes

Ph.D. in Leadership Studies

Department of Leadership Studies

Our Students

Our students are incredibly diverse in their backgrounds, research interests and career trajectories. Click on our featured student profiles below to learn about the types of students in our doctoral program. View additional doctoral student profiles.

Learning Outcomes

Outcome 1: Ph.D. candidates will articulate prominent leadership theories in Leadership Studies, analyze and critique these theories, and apply these theories in the course of addressing a variety of organizational issues and problems.

Outcome 2: Ph.D. candidates will realistically appraise their personal strengths and weaknesses exercising leadership. They will actualize leadership in real and complex situations.

Outcome 3: Ph.D. candidates will be able to use a range of perspectives and theoretical constructs from various social science/humanities disciplines/fields of study to analyze, critique, and make decisions about an array of leadership and organizational issues and problems.

Outcome 4: Ph.D. candidates will demonstrate the methodological skills necessary to design, analyze, critique, and conduct research using both qualitative and quantitative research techniques.

Outcome 5: Students’ written and oral communication will be clear, coherent, well organized, and technically correct. 

Outcome 6: Students will critically examine culture other than own, and apply the knowledge gained within their personal and professional lives.

Alumni Outcomes

There are over 300 alumni of the doctorate in Leadership Studies. Our alumni include professors, researchers, educators, policymakers, school leaders, university administrators, consultants, executive directors of nonprofits, business leaders, and more.

Dissertation Directory

Explore our searchable directory of doctoral alumni below. To learn more about any individual click the arrow to the right of his or her name.

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First Name
Last Name
Year Graduated
Title
RobertFink1990Vision: An Essential Component of Transforming LeadershipMore detail
JaimeRomo1998Voices Against Discrimination and Exclusion: Latino School Leaders' Narratives for ChangeMore detail
JanSecrist1996Voices of Midlife Tomboys: A Narrative StudyMore detail
LindseyMcDougle2011Voluntary Sector Rich and Voluntary Sector Poor Communities: What Difference Does the Distinction Really Make?More detail
EllaSloan2003W.E.B. Dubois's \Talented Tenth\: A Pioneering Conception of Transformational Leadership"\""\"""""More detail
JeffreyBolster2011What Do They Say? Students from a Private, Faith-based, Four Year University Share Their Perspectives on College as a Mentoring EnvironmentMore detail
JeffreyCarlstead2004What Effect Does the Hampton Inn 100% Unconditional Satisfaction Guarantee Have on Customer Loyalty?More detail
RaymondRoll2007Wherry Revisited: An Empirical Examination of the Nonperformance Factors that Influence Variation in a Performance RatingMore detail
DavidHerrera2004Why Participate? Finding Meaning by Partaking in Decisions affecting Us, Our Work and Our LivesMore detail
LorriSulpizio2010Women and Authority: Transitioning Into A Role Of Assigned Authority As A Graduate Teaching Assistant in A Leadership ClassMore detail
StevenRobbins1995Women and Men in Collaborative Working Partnerships: Connecting Two Disparate Modes of ExperienceMore detail
JacquelineFitzpatrick1996Women Mentoring Women: A Phenomenological StudyMore detail
PressleyRankin IV2013Work/Life Boundary Management In An Integrative Environment: A Study Of Residence Life Professionals Who Live At Their Place Of WorkMore detail
AlanaNicastro2004Wresting and Arresting Sense In Academe: The Complicated Discursive Structures of Female Assistant ProfessorsMore detail
HelenEckmann2003\You Are With Someone Who is a Fighter"\"": Constructing a Model of Personal Transformation That Can Occur in Surviving Breast Cancer\"""""More detail
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