Contact:

School of Peace Studies

Contact: Marisa Alioto
mnalioto@sandiego.edu
Phone: (619) 260-7929
Fax: (619) 849-8109

Location: KIPJ Room 113
Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies
5998 Alcala Park
San Diego, CA 92110

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Academic Programs

Master's Seminars and Workshops

Core Courses

  1. Conflict Analysis, Prevention and Resolution
  2. International Justice and Human Rights
  3. Development and Conflict
  4. Research Methodology

Areas of Emphasis

  • Conflict Analysis and Resolution
  • Human Rights
  • Development and Human Security

Peace and Justice Studies Program Courses

Please note that courses below may not be offered every semester. 

PS 510 - Religion and Conflict Transformation

PS 540 - Research Methodology

PS 550 - Conflict Analysis, Prevention and Resolution

PS 553 - International Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding

PS 556 - International Negotiations

PS 558 - Peace and Justice in World Politics: Theory and Practice

PS 563 - Nonviolence and Peace Education

PS 570 - Development and Conflict

PS 572 - Environmental Justice

PS 574 - Civil Society, Peacebuilding and Development

PS 580 - International Justice and Human Rights

PS 582 - Transitional Justice and Responding to Mass Atrocities

PS 588 - Human Rights Advocacy

PS 594 - Special Topics in Peace and Justice Studies

PS 595 - Peace and Justice Studies Capstone

PS 598 - Internship

PS 599 - Independent Study

PS 510 Religion and Conflict Transformation (3)

An exploration of the relationship between religion and the dynamics of conflict, focusing on the role of religion in conflict, peacebuilding and conflict transformation. Selected religious traditions will be considered, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, giving attention to such topics as their impact on processes of conflict, their function in violence prevention, reconciliation, and social change, and their resources for promoting peace and justice as human development.

PS 540 Research Methodology (3)

This course introduces students to philosophies behind social science research, as well as the elements of the research process, and consists of three units. The first unit addresses the philosophy of social/scientific research and the importance of policy and information underpinned by credible research. The second unit focuses on general research design issues and an overview of qualitative and quantitative methods. The final unit focuses on two types of research: case study and evaluation/assessment.

PS 550 Conflict Analysis, Prevention and Resolution (3)

This course will examine how conflicts are identified and analyzed, from low-level political violence to major armed conflict, and what theories and tools exist to resolve these conflicts. Students will read classic works in this interdisciplinary field, gaining an understanding of the different scholarly approaches taken to prevent and resolve armed conflict. Students will work in teams on particular case studies, applying theories learned.

PS 553 International Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding (3)

This course focuses on third-party strategies for ethical intervention in civil and international conflicts. The particular focus is on environments where one party contests the legitimacy of an existing political authority or arrangement. The course studies the special dynamics of these cases in ongoing armed conflict and post-war environments: widespread insecurity, lack of effective government control or functioning, and collective trauma.

PS 556 International Negotiations (3)

This is an analytical and skills training course offering advanced training in the theory and practice of negotiations. Simulated negotiations of increasing complexity are carried on, both inside and outside the classroom. In the course, students are introduced to various negotiation contexts including cross-cultural and cross-gender issues. Course participants from the Peace and Justice Studies program will be integrated into the law school course which is composed of a mixture of U.S. law students and non-U.S. lawyers who are enrolled in USD's LLM-CL program.

PS 558 Peace and Justice in World Politics: Theory and Practice (3)

An analysis of the theoretical literature on the causes of war and conditions of peace and justice focusing on issues of sovereignty, global governance, military, and non-military aspects of security human rights, and positive and negative peace.

PS 563 Nonviolence and Peace Education (3)

This course examines the dynamics, strengths and limitations of nonviolent actions, social movements and peace education as alternatives to violence and as means for insuring human security. Drawing from history, international relations, political science, military, state security and public policy frameworks, students will seek explanations, estimate costs, and assess justifications of violence and of nonviolence. The course will examine ways, through action and education, to encourage people to opt for personal and collective practices of nonviolence.

PS 570 Development and Conflict (3)

This course will examine (1) the main economic theories of development and conflict (paying particular attention to the ways in which the two may be linked), (2) the great debates in conflict economies, and (3) the spatial dimensions of violent conflict. It will build a logical and intuitive appreciation of concepts covered by employing both deductive (theoretical) and inductive (empirically-grounded theory-building) exercises.

PS 572 Environmental Justice (3)

Examination of environmental justice and its relationship to sustainability and the protection of the non-human world. Local, national, and global issues and cases will be considered. Multidisciplinary pedagogical approaches grounded by political and environmental philosophy will be used. Particular attention will be drawn to environmental, social, political, and economic inequalities, injustices and oppression based on differences of gender, race, ethnicity, class, national origin and species membership.

PS 574 Civil Society, Peacebuilding and Development (3)

This course, drawing on political theory and democratization literature, will explore the strengths and weaknesses of civil society organizations seeking to build peace, development and democracy after violent conflict. Through case studies, the course will examine places where poverty and inequity were root causes of conflict, requiring social change to meet basic human needs, ensure rights and guarantee security.

PS 580 International Justice and Human Rights (3)

An introduction both to the international law of human rights and to the principal institutions, organizations, and processes designed to protect those rights. Some attention will also be given to a few more "theoretical" issues, such as: What is the relationship between religion and human rights? Does the international law of human rights unjustifiably favor "western" over "non-western" moral perspectives?

PS 582 Transitional Justice and Responding to Mass Atrocities (3)

This course examines the range of possible legal, institutional, and policy frameworks that have been marshaled in an attempt to respond to large-scale human rights atrocities in the wake of conflict, from tribunals to truth commissions and beyond. It will also examine debates about stopping ongoing mass atrocities through "humanitarian intervention" and the "responsibility to protect" doctrine.

PS 588 Human Rights Advocacy (3)

An examination of the actors and organizations conducting modern-day human rights advocacy and the techniques central to their work, including fact-finding, monitoring, report writing, and media work. The course will balance practical skill development (interviewing, press release writing) with a critical and reflective examination of the ethical and strategic dilemmas faced by human rights advocates today.

PS 594 Special Topics in Peace and Justice Studies (1-3)

A specialized course focusing on a topic in conflict resolution, development, human rights or human security. The course can be repeated if the topic changes.

PS 595 Peace and Justice Studies Capstone (3)

A study of a current or developing problem threatening or preventing peace and/or justice. The case study will integrate skills and perspectives acquired in th eprogram. Prerequisite for the course is approval of a case study prospectus. Students must achieve a B or higher to receive credit.

PS 598 Internship (3)

This course involves participation in an internship related to one of the four areas of specialization within the Peace and Justice Studies Master's curriculum: conflict analysis and resolution, development, human rights, or human security. Internship placements will take place during the summer for 10 weeks with a follow-up course in the fall semester. Prerequisite: Students must be in the Peace and Justice Studies master's program. Grading for the course is on a Pass/Fail basis.

PS 599 Independent Study (1-3)

An independent study project for up to three units provides students an opportunity to research a topic of particular interest to them relevant to Peace and Justice Studies. The faculty supervisor, program director, and dean of the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies must approve the project proposal prior to the beginning of the relevant semester. The course may be repeated up to a maximum of 3 units. Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least one semester in the Peace and Justice Studies master's program.

Peace and Justice Studies Program Workshops

Master's students also have the opportunity to take weekend workshops to enhance their skills.  Some examples include Project Management, Mediation, Grant Writing, Restorative Justice, and Interpersonal and Small Group Conflict Resolution.