USD in the News

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5.31.16

Automotive News -- Robert Hoehn might be the only automobile dealer ever to employ valuable prints by the great artist Rembrandt van Rijn as props to motivate his sales staff. Hoehn, 63, co-owner of a Carlsbad, Calif., dealership group with 10 franchises (see box, Page 20), has shared the masterpieces he owns with his staff and with the University of San Diego in the form of two galleries he and his wife, Karen, have endowed. (Full Story)

5.26.16

The Hollywood Reporter -- Each year, only seven students are accepted (about 2 percent of applicants) to this joint venture between the university and the city's esteemed Old Globe theater (where students participate in a renowned summer Shakespeare festival). (Full Story)

5.25.16

U-T San Diego -- It’s no secret that two of the top graduate theater programs in the country are situated here in San Diego. But a new survey from The Hollywood Reporter reaffirms not just the national but the world stature of the MFA program at the University of San Diego. (Full Story) 

5.24.16

Online Accounting Degree Programs --  Whether you are looking to ascend the corporate ladder to an executive role or are just stepping up onto the first rung, the University of San Diego’s Master of Science in Accountancy and Taxation program is sure to provide both the challenge and opportunities you need to succeed. (Full Story)

5.20.16

Innovation Hub -- Conservatives and libertarians don’t usually support government handouts. But Matt Zwolinski, a philosophy professor at the University of San Diego and founder of the Bleeding Heart Libertarians blog, likes the idea of a basic income. He says it gives poor people more agency than the current “paternalistic” way welfare is distributed. (Full Story)

5.20.16

U-T San Diego-- USD’s Torero Renaissance Scholars provides a variety of services to create a supportive network that connects students to tutors, provides leadership opportunities, helps engage them on campus and promotes overall well-being. Alejandra Lopez-Cuellar, 22, is graduating Sunday and is one of the first students to go through the USD program over four years. (Full Story) 

5.07.16

Standard-Times -- Ev Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego, said the region is a hot spot for drug smuggling.

“San Diego and parts of Arizona have seen this proliferation of tunnels. That’s not true in other parts of the border. Some of it is geography, but it’s also the nature of the business. According to the DEA and most authorities, we’re still in the general territory of the Sinaloa Cartel,” he said. (Full Story)

5.06.16

The New York Times -- Victor Fleischer, a law professor at the University of San Diego, is another who has recommended that the Treasury get rid of the unjust tax treatment on carried interest. Mr. Fleischer, a contributor to The New York Times, has also estimated how much money such a change would bring to the Treasury.

“It’s something that Obama could accomplish and, to be honest, I’m not entirely sure why the Treasury hasn’t taken an interest in it,” Mr. Fleischer said in an interview. “In fact, there is quite a bit of revenue at stake. And doing this on carried interest would cement Obama’s legacy in substance as well as symbolically.” (Full Story)

5.06.16

San Diego Downtown News -- According to a study conducted by researchers at the University of San Diego and Point Loma Nazarene University, between 8,830 and 11,773 San Diegans fall victim to sex trafficking per year. The average age of entry is 15 years old, mostly facilitated by gangs. (Full Story)

5.05.16

KPBS -- Matt Zwolinski, a University of San Diego associate professor of philosophy who has written about the ethics of drug pricing, said in an email the price could be seen as justifiable because "there seems to be good medical reason for regarding this drug as filling a special need."

He said: "It’s important to remember that what patients are paying for is not just the physical drug they consume. They’re paying for the years of research and testing that went into discovering that drug and shepherding it through FDA approval. And they’re paying for all the research and testing of drugs that never made it to market." (Full Story)

5.05.16

Times of San Diego -- The University of San Diego announced Thursday that it was awarded a $100,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to track barnacles to learn how El Niño affects marine life.

This year’s strong El Niño provides an opportunity to study how coastal marine species are affected by the warming sea surface temperatures and changes in ocean currents, according to Nathalie Reyns, associate professor of environmental and ocean sciences.

“We have a poor understanding of how coastal marine species are influenced by El Niño,” Reyns said. (Full Story)

5.03.16

Los Angeles Times -- Ev Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego, said the region is a hot spot for drug smuggling.

"San Diego and parts of Arizona have seen this proliferation of tunnels. That's not true in other parts of the border. Some of it is geography, but it's also the nature of the business. According to the DEA and most authorities, we're still in the general territory of the Sinaloa cartel," he said. (Full Story)

5.03.16

The Huffington Post -- Joel Gruber, University of San Diego

Each semester, I teach courses on religion to undergraduates. On the first day of my introduction to religion course, “Exploring Religious Meaning,” it is evident the students’ enthusiasm for the class can be quite low. If I were one of them, I would likely feel the same. In fact, I was, and I did. (Full Story)

4.29.16

The Tribune -- The college is one of four California programs that make the list,, which ranks the top 114 colleges and univities in the U.S. The others are UC Berkeley (No. 36), Santa Clara University (No. 51) and University of San Diego (No. 53). (Full Story)

4.29.16

U-T San Diego -- The University of San Diego’s monthly analysis showed the local economy grew just 0.4 percent in March, mostly because of a huge drop in residential units authorized by building permits.

Other parts of the local economy were good, said the university’s Index of Leading Economic Indicators, which was released Thursday. Unemployment claims were down, local stocks are bouncing back and help wanted advertising is up, it said. (Full Story)

4.29.16

Miami Herald -- “What multinational corporations are doing when they set up a Cayman Islands or a Bermuda company is tax avoidance, which is legal,” said Victor Fleischer, a tax law professor at the University of San Diego. “If not endorsed by the U.S. government, it’s certainly not necessarily viewed badly. The purpose of these companies is not to hide assets or keep the government from having information. It’s merely to take advantage of the legal rules." (Full Story)

4.29.16

Times of San Diego -- Also in November will be a joint production with the University of San Diego graduate theater program of the Bard’s “The Two Gentlemen of Verona.” (Full Story)

4.29.16

Seaside Courier -- The University of San Diego Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate's Index of Leading Economic Indicators for San Diego County rose 0.4 percent in March to a post-recession high.

USD professor Alan Gin said gains in the job market and local stock prices led the way, more than offsetting a dip in residential housing permits issued by local government and a small decrease in consumer confidence. The number of housing permits that were issued fell for the first time in six months, he said. (Full Story)

4.28.16

KPBS -- A report released Thursday hints that San Diego County's economy will continue to get better through the rest of the year.

According to University of San Diego's Index of Leading Economic Indicators, the index value climbed four-tenths of a point in March. That continues a steady but short upward trend.

"It is the fifth time in six months that the index has been up, so that portends some good news for the local economy. I expect that we're going to have a positive economy for the rest of 2016," said economist Alan Gin, who put together the report. (Full Story)

4.28.16

NBC 7 San Diego -- Student entrepreneurs from the University of San Diego and universities in Tijuana will compete for $100,000 cash at a “Shark Tank-like” competition Thursday.

The event, called the 2016 VT Entrepreneur Competition, will feature pitches from four USD entrepreneurs and four entrepreneurs from universities in Mexico. The groups will pitch their ideas to a panel of angel investors, San Diego business owners, fellow students, and V2 judges. Students will be judged on the potential success of their venture and ability to be an entrepreneur. (Full Story)

4.25.16

KPBS -- Homicides are up in Mexico after years of decline that started when President Enrique Peña Nieto took office in 2012, according to a new report by researchers at the University of San Diego.

The report, titled "Drug Violence in Mexico," shows homicides increased by 8 percent from 2014 to 2015. But researchers say it's too early to tell if this signals a reversal of the downward trend. (Full Story)

4.22.16

The Sacramento Bee -- “What multinational corporations are doing when they set up a Cayman Islands or a Bermuda company is tax avoidance, which is legal,” said Victor Fleischer, a tax law professor at the University of San Diego. “If not endorsed by the U.S. government, it’s certainly not necessarily viewed badly. The purpose of these companies is not to hide assets or keep the government from having information. It’s merely to take advantage of the legal rules." (Full Story)

4.21.16

The New York Times -- “They keep finding tunnels, they keep getting bigger and longer and more sophisticated,” said David A. Shirk, associate professor of political science and international relations at the University of San Diego. “It just seems like we haven’t reduced the capacity of people to make tunnels. I think this is a problem we have to manage, not a problem we can actually solve.” (Full Story)

4.20.16

Voice of San Diego -- Laura Deitrick, who leads the University of San Diego’s Institute of Nonprofit Education and Research, said she hasn’t heard major outcry locally about the wage hikes.

Her department recently released a survey that aims to gauge local nonprofits’ feelings about the wage hikes, among other issues.

Deitrick said the challenge for local nonprofits is clear: “The cost of (workers) is going up and in the case of nonprofits, you can’t hand that off to your customers.” (Full Story)

4.20.16

Boston Globe -- “Appointing Mueller so early and putting him to work — it just shows you, you’ve got a judge who has a plan,” said Alan Schulman, a professor in residence at the University of San Diego School of Law. “He’s going to move this case forward, rather than let it languish in his court for a decade.” (Full Story)

4.18.16

EdWeek -- “We can continue to buy new programs, resources, but if we fail to engage teachers, we’ll miss out,” said Katie Martin, director of professional learning at the University of San Diego, in her talk. The sentiment of engaging teachers resonated for several presenters. (Full Story)

4.18.16

U-T San Diego -- Despite some rather uncivil behavior during the 2016 presidential campaign, panelists gathered for a morning discussing about civility at the University of San Diego were optimistic about the future.

Then again, next year’s conference may very well focus on ways to heal from this year’s campaign, said Carl Luna, panel moderator and director of the Mesa/City/Miramar/USD Institute for Civil Civic Engagement. (Full Story)

4.18.16

KUSI -- Having a Drone seems to be the new craze, and are being used from toys to technology. Listen in as Austin Chou-Fitzpatrick, PhD., Assistant Professor of Political Sociology, University of San Diego, talks more about Drone Use, for non-violent use. (Full Story)

4.17.16

U-T San Diego -- Drones are more popular than ever, but attempts at creating laws to regulate them have been inconsistent across the country and worldwide, a University of San Diego professor concluded in a new study.

“To date, drone legislation remains scattered and inconsistent, appearing in fits and spurts as legislative bodies at all levels debate what they are dealing with and how to respond to new technology in the minds of the general public,” wrote Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, assistant professor of political sociology with the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies at USD. (Full Story)

4.15.16

L'Chaim San Diego -- The first Cal-Israel Innovation Expo took place on March 8 and 9 at USD and was hosted by the Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering. The Expo featured the latest and greatest products and services from more than three-dozen technology companies based in Israel and California. Here is a sampling of some of the most exciting technologies seen on the show: (Full Story)

4.15.16

L'Chaim San Diego -- ... I have found USD to be the kindest, most supportive place I have ever worked. And with its dedication to issues of social justice and “changemaking” (something akin to tikkun olam), innovation and social entrepreneurship, I was convinced that once Jewish community members learned all that USD has to offer, they would be sold. But the opportunity hadn’t presented itself. Until now. (Full Story)

4.15.16

U-T San Diego -- It was an uneventful, interview-for-a-job-at-the-mall kind of day for University of San Diego volleyball player Lisa Kramer.

Until it wasn’t.

Everything changed in an instant Wednesday, triggered by a stranger blurting out a few frantic words that flooded the bloodstream with adrenaline. “Does anyone know CPR???” (Full Story)

4.15.16

U-T San Diego -- Because March and February tend to have little seasonal variation in hiring, the surge in nonfarm job gains appears to reflect genuine strength, said Alan Gin, a University of San Diego economist.

“I think the national and local economies have some momentum behind them,” Gin said. “It becomes a self-reinforcing thing: People are getting jobs, that gives them money to spend and that leads businesses to do more hiring.” (Full Story)

4.14.16

KPBS -- The 2016 presidential race has seen no shortage of name-calling and insults. And the rancor has kept political pundits very busy.

But is this really the way to conduct the race for president of the United States?

The 5th annual “Restoring Civility to Civic Dialogue” conference in San Diego gets underway Monday at the University of San Diego. The theme is how to help the next generation avoid over-the-top political rhetoric through education. (Full Story)

4.14.16

Del Mar Times -- The University of San Diego Law Center and the San Diego County Bar Association founded the organization in 1983. Since then, NCRC has managed more than 20,000 cases. (Full Story)

4.13.16

Inside Higher Ed -- “It was for the money; she did it for the money,” said Ed Howard, senior counsel at the University of San Diego’s Center for Public Interest Law.

And if she had joined to push for cheaper textbooks, he added, “then shareholders at Wiley and Sons should be very upset.” (Full Story)

4.13.16

San Diego Business Journal -- The award will be used to develop the San Diego Regional Energy Innovation Cluster, a partnership between nine regional organizations that will connect entrepreneurs to facilities, training and resources to bring energy tech to market. The partnership will include Cleantech San Diego, CONNECT, San Diego Venture Group, Imperial Valley Economic Development Corp., Inland Empire Economic Partnership, Center for Sustainable Energy, San Diego State University, UC San Diego, and University of San Diego. (Full Story)

4.13.16

Times of San Diego -- The conference takes place from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on April 23 at the institute on the University of San Diego campus. The conference, titled “Sowing Seeds of Peace, Justice and Success,” is free and open to the public. (Full Story)

4.13.16

The Gazette -- Others believe the Episcopal Church has said enough for now but will need to disclose more soon. Liz Shear, a professor of nonprofit governance at the University of San Diego, said rank-and-file church members will eventually need more information in order to restore their trust.

“This isn’t the end,” Shear said. “They’ll say something about whatever the culture was: whether it was fear or permissiveness or whether you were supposed to turn a blind eye to things. … Otherwise, you’ll lose the community.” (Full Story)

4.13.16

U-T San Diego -- University of San Diego law professor Shaun Martin said public officials should work alongside outside investigators and the media to get to the truth and not work to exempt records from public disclosure.

“Government works best when it shines light on problems, not seeks to keep the public in the dark,” said Martin, who was appointed by the State Bar of California to serve on the committee on Professional Responsibility and Conduct. (Full Story)

4.12.16

KPBS -- Award-winning video game creator and tech executive Asi Burak is lecturing at the University of San Diego's Joan Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice on Tuesday. His lecture, "Power Play, Trends and Opportunities in Gaming for Good," explores how video games can be a force for positive change. (Full Story)

4.12.16

The San Diego Voice and Viewpoint -- Today, April 12, University of San Diego President James T. Harris III will switched places with USD junior Will Tate. Tate has been chosen USD’s inaugural Student President for a Day. (Full Story)

4.12.16

Times of San Diego -- Under the patient direction of a mathematics professor, middle school students assembled a giant sculpture from colorful paper Tuesday at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

4.11.16

Fox Business -- "There is certainly is a risk when they roll over that instrument, that it is going to be recharacterised as equity," said Victor Fleischer, professor of law at the University of San Diego, said of the SAP loans. (Full Story)

4.07.16

National Constitution Center -- Joining We the People to discuss this important issue are two leading constitutional experts and returning champions on the show.

Erwin Chemerinsky is the founding Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law, and Raymond Pryke Professor of First Amendment Law, at the University of California, Irvine School of Law.

Michael Ramsey is the Hugh and Hazel Darling Foundation Professor of Law, and Director of the International & Comparative Law Program, at the University of San Diego School of Law. (Full Story)

4.07.16

Tampa Bay Times -- "Because it has always been at the center of international trade, it was a natural fit for things like offshore finance and international offshore tax planning," said Victor Fleischer, a professor at the University of San Diego School of Law. (Full Story)

4.07.16

Voice of San Diego -- A new study from the University of San Diego’s Center for Education Policy and Law shows that 58 percent of families attending San Diego Unified public schools, including public charter schools, choose to attend their neighborhood school, which means 42 percent look elsewhere. (Full Story)

4.06.16

U-T San Diego -- A three-year study by researchers at the University of San Diego and Point Loma Nazarene University released in December concluded that 8,830 to 11,773 victims, mostly underage girls, are trafficked in San Diego County each year. The illegal activity amounts to a $810 million industry largely run by gangs. (Full Story)

4.06.16

The Davis Enterprise -- Ed Howard, senior counsel for the Center for Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego, focused on the monetary implications of Katehi’s decision to take paid board seats.

“When a public employee who makes more than the president of the United States moonlights … at another paid job, as if $400,000 a year were not enough,” Howard said, “it undermines … the support of (taxpayers) for these public institutions.” (Full Story)

4.06.16

The Sacramento Bee -- “The whole thing smells of a cover-up,” said Ed Howard, senior counsel for the Center for Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego and a public records expert. “It is not very difficult for the University of California or Chancellor Katehi to locate her calendar. It’s not difficult for the university or Chancellor Katehi to finally do the right thing and come clean about how this ever could have happened.” (Full Story)

4.05.16

Times of San Diego -- These are among the questions “Virtual Reality — Real Or Still Virtual?” will try to answer Friday, April 22, at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice, 5998 Alcala Park, on the campus of the University of San Diego. The half-day conference, sponsored by the Asian Heritage Society and San Diego Press Club, takes place 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and is free and open to the public. (Full Story)

4.05.16

U-T San Diego -- How major technological changes can affect peace and security will be the focus of three events next week at the University of San Diego’s Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies.

On Tuesday, April 12 at 7:00 p.m., the School’s Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice will host a lecture with Asi Burak, POWER PLAY: Trends and Opportunities in Gaming for Good, as a part of the Joan B. Kroc Distinguished Lecture Series. (Full Story)

4.04.16

U-T San Diego -- Spiegel, an assistant professor of political science and international relations at USD, specializes in Middle Eastern and North African politics and is author of the recently released "Young Islam: The New Politics of Religion in Morocco and the Arab World." (Full Story)

4.04.16

The Sacramento Bee -- “This is a big problem,” said Ed Howard, senior counsel for the Center for Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

4.02.16

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego who studies the minimum wage’s buying power, said that if the 1968 minimum wage of $1.65 had kept pace with San Diego’s inflation rate, it would now be about $14. Gin said returning that kind of buying power to lower-wage workers will have a positive impact on San Diego’s economy.

“It will help people out at the lower end of the income distribution,” Gin said. “They’ve been previously hurt by the great recession and the nature of wages that we’ve seen over the last 30 to 35 years. When people at the low end get more money, they typically spend almost all of it. That will mean more money pumped into the local economy.” (Full Story)

4.02.16

U-T San Diego -- The future of political Islam will be the subject of talk on campus Monday night by writer and educator Avi Spiegel, who will appear as part of the Illume Speaker Series presented by the College of Arts and Sciences. The free event is in the Warren Auditorium at Mother Rosalie Hill Hall and is scheduled for 6 p.m. (Full Story)

3.31.16

CNBC -- Campaigns don't even necessarily have to spend funds they have raised in order to affect outcomes, said University of San Diego political science professor Casey Dominguez. At least in legislative races, if an incumbent raises enough money, he or she may simply scare off competition, she said. (Full Story)

3.31.16

U-T San Diego -- San Diego County’s economy grew slightly in February, bolstered by online help wanted advertising and a drop in unemployment claims, said a monthly study from the University of San Diego released Thursday. (Full Story)

3.29.16

Buzzfeed News -- “How does an arbitration lawyer get clients?” said Robert Muth, who runs a legal clinic for veterans at the University of San Diego School of Law. “They get chosen by For-Profit U, and what if they start ruling against For-Profit U? They lose their job. It’s a huge structural problem — their livelihood depends on them continuing to rule in favor of a specific company. It’s a stacked deck.” (Full Story)

3.23.16

Advance Healthcare Network -- The University of San Diego's Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science's Beyster Institute for Nursing Research (BINR) is one of only 32 schools of nursing nationwide to receive a 2016 grant to increase the number of nurses holding PhDs. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Future of Nursing Scholars program will provide financial support, mentoring, and leadership development to nurses who commit to earn their PhDs in three years. USD will select one nursing student to receive this prestigious scholarship. (Full Story)

3.23.16

Voice of San Diego -- That was the hope. But a new study from University of San Diego’s Center for Education Policy and Law shows 42 percent of parents across the district choose to send their kids to schools outside their neighborhoods. That’s about the same percentage of students as 2011. (Full Story)

3.23.16

ABC 10 -- Those in favor of the increase say the minimum wage hasn't kept pace with cost of living. Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said many servers who work at lower cost restaurants or work bad hours would benefit from the raise.

"Basically they're at the mercy of how customers feel on a certain day," he said. (Full Story)

3.18.16

NBC 7 San Diego -- Atkins discussed how human trafficking is a significant threat to young women in San Diego, and how the process of de-criminalizing victims, who had previously been treated as prostitutes by law enforcement, is still underway. According to a study by the University of San Diego, sex trafficking represents about $810 million revenue annually. (Full Story)

3.16.16

Times of San Diego -- The American-born choreographer John Neumeier, artistic director of the Hamburg Ballet since 1973, and winner of the 2015 Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy, is here for a symposium before crossing the pond back to Germany.

Neumeier and four principal dancers from Hamburg Ballet flew in from Tokyo Tuesday after a two-week season in Japan.

They will explore “dance as the living shape of emotion” and “Shakespeare as inspiration” in lectures and performances on Thursday, March 17, at the Kyoto Prize Laureate Symposium, held at Shiley Theatre, University of San Diego. (Full Story)

3.15.16

Campus Technology -- After too many years watching students struggle with the transition to college, mobile application developers at the University of San Diego are excited to watch this year's freshmen get organized and get ahead with a highly customized USD personal assistant mobile application. CT asked USD Vice Provost and CIO Christopher W. Wessells about the USD Insight app. (Full Story)

3.15.16

San Diego Story -- They will explore “dance as the living shape of emotion” and “Shakespeare as inspiration” in lectures and performances March 17, at the Kyoto Prize Laureate Symposium, held at Shiley Theatre, University of San Diego.

“I will give two lectures,” Neumeier said in a soft, articulate voice, “but I will stop speaking and show something because the very point of verbalization, rational thought, is foreign to dance in a sense.” (Full Story)

3.14.16

The New Yorker -- The person most responsible for inspiring the movement against the carried-interest tax loophole is Victor Fleischer, a tax-law professor at the University of San Diego School of Law. (Full Story)

3.11.16

New York Post -- The first-of-its-kind study — headed by St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia and the University of San Diego in California — evaluated more than 120 participants, researchers said. (Full Story)

3.11.16

U-T San Diego -- At the University of San Diego, Thursday morning’s session with choreographer John Neumeier and four of his Hamburg Ballet dancers was booked solid weeks ago. (Full Story)

3.11.16

U-T San Diego -- John Neumeier, the 2015 recipient of the Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy, will talk about his approach to choreography Thursday morning as part of the annual Kyoto Prize Symposium at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

3.09.16

KTVU-SF -- A new study from the University of San Diego, says if you instagram your food it may actually taste better. Researchers say by taking a photo we delay eating and that just builds up anticipation of enjoyment. (Full Story)

3.09.16

Columbia Daily Tribune -- Malachi Black is an Assistant Professor at the University of San Diego

Streetlights were our stars, hanging from the midnight in a planetary arc above each empty ShopRite parking lot — spreading steam-bright through the neon dark (Full Story)

3.09.16

KUSI -- Casey Dominguez is an Associate Professor in the University of San Diego Political Science Department. Watch her recent interview on KUSI, where Dominguez discusses the 2016 Presidential Election. (Full Story) 

3.09.16

U-T San Diego -- USD graduate student Rebecca Schwartz is working to coax a corner of the bay back to its original state, by restoring natural habitat around Kendall Frost Marsh and connecting the marsh to nearby Rose Creek. (Full Story)

3.08.16

Voice of San Diego -- “Giving one person $28 million worth of business, I don’t get that. Maybe there is a reason for it, but my assumption would be you have a pool of people and not let any one person dominate. That’s a system that’s healthy,” said Robert Fellmeth, director of the University of San Diego’s Center for Public Interest Law. (Full Story)

3.08.16

HuffPost Politics -- These incidents make it clear that every talking head who has dismissed critics worried about the tone of this year’s presidential election need to think again because, as an aptly titled column today in the Times of San Diego noted: “We need civility in politics because the kids are watching.” The point is if candidates are asking us to vote for them to hold the highest office in our country - to be our representative to the world - shouldn’t we hold them to the highest standards of behavior? Will it be so entertaining if an ill-spoken comment about a foreign leader prompts tense relations or worse? What lesson are we teaching our youngest generation - that it’s okay to demean people based on their looks, their heritage, and/or their disabilities? (Full Story)

3.07.16

Voice of San Diego -- Laura Deitrick, who leads the University of San Diego’s Institute for Nonprofit Education and Research, said that increased data-sharing could be a powerful way to identify community issues that may not be on local leaders’ radar.

“The idea would be to understand where needs aren’t being met,” said Deitrick, who analyzes 2-1-1 data in USD reports on the nonprofit sector. (Full Story)

3.07.16

Religion Dispatches -- To pursue these questions further, the Cubit reached out to religion scholar Aaron Gross, author of a 2014 book, The Question of the Animal and Religion: Theoretical Stakes, Practical Implications. Gross, an Associate Professor of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of San Diego, and the founder of Farm Forward, met with Cubit co-editor Andrew Aghapour at a coffee shop in Chapel Hill, North Carolina to explore how religion applies to elephants, dogs, chimpanzees, and factory farming. (Full Story)

3.07.16

Daily News -- “Whenever Calderon would take out a top guy, in the aftermath … what we would always see is some kind of internal struggle or some kind of new violence coming from other organizations trying to take advantage of the weakness of the cartel that got hit,” David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego, told Business Insider in late 2015. (Full Story)

3.07.16

Consumer Affairs -- “When we take a photo of something before eating, we create a momentary but intentional delay in consumption, allowing all of the senses to be engaged and building the anticipation of enjoyment,” says Coary, who teamed up with Morgan Poor, Ph.D., assistant professor of marketing at the University of San Diego, to study the effects of taking a photo of food prior to eating it. (Full Story)

3.07.16

U-T San Diego -- Mexican human rights journalist and author Marcela Turati will discuss “Women Empowerment in the Midst of Tragedy” today at the University of San Diego’s annual International Women’s Day breakfast.

The event, from 7 to 9 a.m., will be hosted by the school’s Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice. (Full Story)

3.07.16

Times of San Diego -- One year later, bright green shoots of civic learning are sprouting as high school juniors and seniors in San Diego schools compete for scholarships through their participation in this year’s Student Civility Awards contest as part of the 2016 Restoring Respect Conference at the University of San Diego. Their essays, artwork, and videos answering the question of “We the People: How Can We Fulfill the Most Important Promise of the Constitution?” give a provocative look at the state of our democracy through the eyes of San Diego’s youth. (Full Story)

3.07.16

Times of San Diego -- Carl Luna, USD Visiting Professor

The rhetoric in this election gives urgency to the need to equip students with tools to become thoughtful participants in our democracy through civic learning in schools. Seeds of student civic learning were planted last April when the San Diego Unified School District agreed to integrate six education practices for civic education into the curriculum, part of a statewide pilot program, the California Task Force on K-12 Civic Learning, co-chaired by the Judith McConnell, administrative presiding justice of the Court of Appeal, Fourth Appellate District. (Full Story)

3.06.16

The New York Times -- But many tax experts say even that logic is a stretch. The argument for taxing Mr. Zuckerberg at a lower rate “is that there’s an undersupply of entrepreneurs, and the world needs more Zuckerbergs,” said Victor Fleischer, a professor at the University of San Diego School of Law, who writes occasionally for The New York Times and has advised the coalition on its revenue estimates. “You can’t make the argument that there’s an undersupply of venture capitalists or private equity fund managers. (Full Story)

3.05.16

U-T San Diego -- On Friday evening, in Founders Chapel at the University of San Diego, the Bach Collegium celebrated the adventurous spirit and astonishing perseverance of both slaves and colonists in a program titled “An Empire of Silver and Gold: Music of 18th Century Latin America.” (Full Story)

3.04.16

U-T San Diego -- More rights for children and women is an international movement of the moment, not just an American value, points out University of San Diego Professor Thomas Reifer, a sociologist who studies long-term social change.

“There’s been an attempt to have the international norms regarding questions of dignity and human rights be extended to children,” Reifer said. (Full Story)

3.03.16

A Plus -- Researchers Sean Coary, Ph.D., an assistant professor of food marketing at Saint Joseph's University and Morgan Poor, Ph.D., assistant professor of marketing at the University of San Diego teamed up to study how our food photos affect satisfaction levels of our meals. (Full Story)

3.03.16

SD Metro -- The University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science: Beyster Institute for Nursing Research is one of only 32 schools of nursing nationwide to receive a 2016 grant to increase the number of nurses holding PhDs.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Future of Nursing Scholars program will provide financial support, mentoring, and leadership development to nurses who commit to earn their PhDs in three years. USD’s Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science selects one nursing student to receive this prestigious scholarship. (Full Story)

3.03.16

San Diego Business Journal -- Improving life in the workplace is especially common among tech firms, said Miriam Rothman, a professor of management in the University of San Diego School of Business. Tech companies are compensating their workers for the demands of their profession.

“The tech industry understands that it’s not a 9-to-5 job,” she said. “There is a complexity. You can get lost in it.” (Full Story)

3.03.16

U-T San Diego -- Laura Deitrick, director of the Institute for Nonprofit Education and Research at the University of San Diego, said it is becoming more common for charities to form or acquire a for-profit subsidiary to support their core mission.

“Best practices suggest that the nonprofit take great care to ensure that the two entities be as distinct as possible,” she said. “While I cannot speak to MHS directly, I can say that when faced with a program, asset or subsidiary that is losing money, the board of directors is ultimately responsible for making the appropriate plans to remedy financial problems.” (Full Story)

3.03.16

KUSI -- Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego, sat down with KUSI to talk more about this study. (Full Story)

3.02.16

The Intercept -- Victor Fleischer, a leading tax lawyer and professor at the University of San Diego, questioned Clinton’s embrace of the short-termism argument in the New York Times earlier this month, saying it would “do little to address top-end income inequality,” since plenty of wealthy people buy and hold. And Fleischer explicitly worries that the short-termism idea originated from Fink. “I find it hard to shake the feeling that at the end of the day, in a Clinton administration, it would be Larry Fink, not the technocrats, calling the shots,” Fleischer wrote. (Full Story)

3.01.16

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution -- Pausing to take a photo of a culinary creation can help build anticipation in a mindful moment. Professors Sean Coary of Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia and Morgan Poor at the University of San Diego report in the Journal of Consumer Marketing that taking food selfies helps boost the satisfaction of a meal. (Full Story)

3.01.16

Atlanta Journal-Constitution -- If anyone gives you grief for photographing your food, just say you’re doing it for your health.

Pausing to take a photo of a culinary creation can help build anticipation in a mindful moment. Professors Sean Coary of Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia and Morgan Poor at the University of San Diego report in the Journal of Consumer Marketing that taking food selfies helps boost the satisfaction of a meal. (Full Story)

2.29.16

Times of San Diego -- The University of San Diego‘s monthly index of leading economic Indicators for San Diego County showed a mixed bag of results in January, with half the indicators up and the others down.

Professor Alan Gin of the Burnham-Moores Institute for Real Estate said Monday that left the index unchanged, following three months of increases.

Gin said the amount of help-wanted advertising jumped last month, with smaller improvements in the employment picture and the number of residential units authorized by building permits. Ads for job-seekers were at their highest level since November 2007, he said. (Full Story)

2.29.16

U-T San Diego -- San Diego County’s economy chugged along in January with no overall change, a monthly study from the University of San Diego released Monday shows.

Two categories in the monthly Index of Leading Economic Indicators did show big movements. January had the most help wanted advertising since the recession. Local stocks, however, took a huge drop. (Full Story)

2.29.16

Times of San Diego -- In “Arts and Philosophy,” John Neumeier, a world-renowned choreographer, has combined traditional ballet techniques and vocabulary through bodily expression and human psychology. Neumeier will present at the USD on March 17 at 10:30 a.m. (Full Story)

2.29.16

Patch -- The University of San Diego Burnham-Moores Institute for Real Estate's Index of Leading Economic Indicators for San Diego County was released Monday, showing a mixed bag of results in January, with half the indicators up and the others down.

Professor Alan Gin said that left the index unchanged, following three months of increases. (Full Story)

2.27.16

NBC 7 San Diego -- A University of San Diego (USD) student who lost his eyesight in a hit-and-run crash has now gained many things: a canine companion, loyal friends and newfound confidence.

Michael Girard, an undergraduate student majoring in sociology at USD, was involved in a life-changing crash in the late 1990s. As he rode his motorcycle from California to New Mexico, Girard was struck by a car. The driver fled the scene, leaving him badly injured. (Full Story)

2.26.16

The World Weekly -- "What happens with Nueva Generacion over the next year is going to reshape the landscape of drug trafficking in Mexico," David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego, who studies the drug trade and Mexico's justice system, told the Los Angeles Times. (Full Story)

2.26.16

Fox News Latino -- “We have seen a fragmentation of organized crime in Mexico,” David Shirk, a political science professor at the University of San Diego and director of the Justice in Mexico project, told Fox News Latino. “When you fragment organized crime, you democratize violence, and you bring the violence closer to ordinary people.” (Full Story)

2.26.16

KUSI -- University of San Diego President James T. Harris III, DEd, announced “Leading Change: The Campaign for USD,” a comprehensive campaign focusing on fundraising in five critical areas: capital projects, scholarships, program and faculty support, and the endowment. President Harris announced the campaign’s goal is to raise $300 million. (KUSI), (CBS 8) and (NBC San Diego)

2.25.16

The World Post -- “For all the hoopla there has been about the need for Mexico to extradite ‘El Chapo’ Guzmán as part of its cooperation with the United States, the United States is missing a key element in its cross-border cooperation apparatus because it doesn’t have an ambassador,” David Shirk, director of the University of San Diego’s Trans-Border Institute, told The WorldPost. “That jeopardizes the effectiveness of U.S.-Mexico cooperation in a really serious way.” (Full Story)

2.25.16

Broadway World -- The University of San Diego will host John Neumeier, the 2015 recipient of the Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy for the annual Kyoto Prize Symposium, Thursday, March 17, 10:30 a.m. in Shiley Theatre. Mr. Neumeier is the preeminent artistic director and choreographer of Germany's Hamburg Ballet. He will share his choreographic approach with the San Diego community while leading four of the Hamburg Ballet's principal dancers through a demonstration of his unique artistic talents. (Full Story)

2.25.16

U-T San Diego -- One of Sister Corita Kent's biggest successes was her smallest work of art. Her ink and watercolor design, six swashes of color, decorated the 1985 “Love” stamp for the U.S. Postal Service, which sold more than 700 million of them. ... The University of San Diego will present “love is here to stay (and that’s enough): Prints by Sister Corita Kent” through May 13 in Founders Hall. (Full Story)

2.25.16

Crime Watch Daily -- San Diego Chief Deputy District Attorney Summer Stephan is on the front line. She says human trafficking is the world's fastest growing crime, worth an estimated $32 billion annually, $810 million in San Diego alone. (Full Story)

2.25.16

U-T San Diego -- The University of San Diego is launching the largest fundraising campaign in its history with plans for new capital projects, scholarships, endowments, programs and faculty support.

“This is a way to raise the profile of the needs of the university and aspirations for the future,” USD President James Harris said about the $300 million campaign, which kicked off Thursday afternoon with a celebration at the Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice on campus. (Full Story)

2.25.16

Times of San Diego -- The University of San Diego Thursday announced a major fundraising campaign with a $300 million goal.

Leading Change: The Campaign for USD, will focus on capital projects, scholarships, program and faculty support, and the endowment, according to USD President James Harris III. The campaign was described as the most ambitious in the school’s 67-year history.

“USD is a community on an adventurous mission of light and enlightenment,” Harris said. (Full Story)

2.24.16

Times of San Diego -- “Twenty years ago, as a newcomer to the Maritime Museum of San Diego, Ray approached me with a plan to build a replica of Cabrillo’s galleon San Salvador,” said University of San Diego professor Iris Engstrand. “I replied that there were no plans, no notes by Cabrillo, only a vague knowledge of where it was built, and no idea how exactly it was done.” (Full Story)

2.23.16

KPBS -- Films about border culture, immigration and drug violence will be featured during the 10th annual Border Film Week at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

2.22.16

Catholic News Service -- San Diego Bishop Robert W. McElroy is challenging U.S. Catholics to take an active role in combating "the scourge of anti-Islamic prejudice."

"We are witnessing in the United States a new nativism, which the American Catholic community must reject and label for the religious bigotry which it is," he said in a keynote address delivered Feb. 17 in the University of San Diego's Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice.

The evening event took place against the backdrop of the first national Catholic-Muslim dialogue, which was held Feb. 17-18 at the Catholic university. (Full Story)

2.22.16

U-T San Diego -- Films that touch on the subjects of race, violence and migration are being presented Tuesday through Thursday on the University of San Diego campus as part of the Trans-Border Institute’s Border Film Week. (Full Story)

2.18.16

Times of San Diego -- San Diego State University, UC San Diego and the University of San Diego all ranked among the schools sending the most alumni to work in the Peace Corps last year, according to the U.S. international service agency. (Full Story)

2.17.16

U-T San Diego -- University of San Diego law professor Michael Ramsey, Scalia’s U.S. Supreme Court clerk in 1990 and 1991, went on three of those outings. On his initial trip, they caught only tiny fish — “nothing appealing to the justice’s sense of adventure,” Ramsey recalls. The next time they ventured farther out and caught “absolutely nothing.

“We ended up buying some yellowtail from other fishermen,” Ramsey says. But the third time was the charm. “I had tuna in my freezer for the next year.” (Full Story)

2.17.16

Forbes -- David Shirk, a University of San Diego professor, agrees. “I certainly think one could argue that, by seeking to represent him [El Chapo] professionally, she aspired to be among the individuals who provide support to those significant foreign narcotics traffickers…” designated under the Kingpin Act. (Full Story)

2.17.16

KPBS -- As part of a national dialogue led by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the University of San Diego will host a public discussion Wednesday night on how religions and communities can come together to resist extremism. (Full Story)

2.17.16

Business Insider -- “These guys have strong legal defenses,” University of San Diego professor and Wilson Center fellow David Shirk said during the same Wilson Center panel. “And they have rights, technically.” (Full Story)

2.16.16

CNN -- Cid Martinez is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of San Diego

Last week, Bernie Sanders' campaign released a four-minute video ad featuring an endorsement from the daughter of Eric Garner, the New York man who was choked to death by New York City police officers. In the course of the ad, Erica Garner talked about her father's death as unjust and its effect on her and her young daughter. (Full Story)

2.16.16

The New York Times -- Others think the bully pulpit of the church and Francis’s popularity could make some Mexicans think twice before signing themselves over to cartels, given the strength of religion in the family structure here. “The church can play a pretty significant role in combating organized crime in Mexico, as it did in Italy, by stigmatizing those who enter into the drug trade and especially those who resort to violence,” said David Shirk, a University of San Diego professor. “Their devout mamas won’t like it.” (Full Story)

2.16.16

Voice of San Diego -- “I don’t think anyone has dared to criticize the Catholic Church so vocally and so openly in recent times. And arguably it could have only come from the pope himself,” said David Shirk, director of the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego. “The church’s leaders have basically rested on their laurels, and in the worst cases have been as corrupt as the rest of Mexico’s political leaders.” (Full Story)

2.15.16

ArcaMax -- "I don't think anyone has dared to criticize the Catholic Church so vocally and so openly in recent times. And arguably it could have only come from the pope himself," said David Shirk, director of the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego. "The church's leaders have basically rested on their laurels, and in the worst cases have been as corrupt as the rest of Mexico's political leaders." (Full Story

2.15.16

San Diego Business Journal -- “We are honored to host this premiere event that will showcase emerging technologies to power the future and foster global innovation, cross-cultural education, and professional development worldwide,” said Chell Roberts, dean of the university’s Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering, which is hosting the expo. (Full Story)

2.15.16

College Magazine -- University of San Diego marketing professor Justine Rapp focuses on digital and social media marketing and sees the impact social media has on society today. “The problem arises because its constant real-time updates create the fear of missing out on something important and thus is behaviorally addictive,” Rapp said. “Our global youth needs to understand issues of privacy, self-presentation and really what social media is meant for: connection and understanding, not competition.” (Full Story)

2.15.16

Los Angeles Times -- “I don’t think anyone has dared to criticize the Catholic Church so vocally and so openly in recent times. And arguably it could have only come from the pope himself,” said David Shirk, director of the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego. “The church’s leaders have basically rested on their laurels, and in the worst cases have been as corrupt as the rest of Mexico’s political leaders.” (Full Story)

2.14.16

NBC San Diego -- Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who passed away Saturday morning, made several trips to the University of San Diego over the course of his career. Many of the professors who met him expressed their sadness Saturday at losing such a brilliant legal mind and dear friend.

USD law professor Mike Devitt said Justice Scalia always took time to visit his law class and even judged several law competitions. Devitt and Scalia even went fishing together. (Full Story)

2.13.16

WITN -- “The two best comparisons of extraditions from Mexico would be Osiel Cardenas and Benjamin Arellano Felix, two major cartel heads that were extradited,” said University of San Diego professor and Wilson Center fellow David Shirk during a discussion of Mexican security at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC, last month. (Full Story)

2.13.16

U-T San Diego -- On both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border, law-enforcement authorities and drug experts are watching the group closely. “What happens with Nueva Generación over the next year is going to reshape the landscape of drug trafficking in Mexico,” said David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego who studies the drug trade and Mexico’s justice system. (Full Story)

2.12.16

The Christian Science Monitor -- Ev Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego, agrees that increased cross-border collaboration is a good idea, but he says the US-Mexico war on drugs must go well beyond joint law enforcement operations. (Full Story)

2.12.16

ABC 10 -- University of San Diego economist Alan Gin said every penny saved on gasoline means consumers as a whole have an extra $1 million to spend each month.

“Instead of spending that money on gas, they’d be buying other products and eating out more,” he said. (Full Story)

2.12.16

Yahoo! News -- Ev Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego, agrees that increased cross-border collaboration is a good idea, but he says the US-Mexico war on drugs must go well beyond joint law enforcement operations.

“There is a whole set of social, economic, and security problems that Mexico and the United States share, and because the origins of the problems are shared, the solutions have to be shared too.” (Full Story)

2.11.16

National Catholic Reporter -- "If you look at 2010 or 2011, it was absolutely the eye of the storm," said Everard Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. "Large sections of the city had been abandoned, the murder rate was stratospheric, the surrounding area was occupied by military. ... That hurt the city in many ways, but it's really important to know that's not the case anymore. Juárez has come roaring back, and there's a lot of hope in the city." (Full Story)

2.11.16

Fox News Latino -- "Approving Guzmán's extradition should be relatively quick," David Shirk, political science professor at the University of San Diego and director of the Justice in Mexico project, told Fox News Latino after Guzmán’s capture in January. "The only concern is if he files an injunction that could delay the move." (Full Story)

2.11.16

Los Angeles Times -- Francis may take the opportunity to urge clerics to take a more active role in building communities and youth programs resistant to the pull of organized crime. Thus far, the church’s efforts, with some exceptions, have been paltry, said David Shirk, director of the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego.

“The fact that the current pope is coming to Mexico and emphasizing the issue of crime and violence, and going to places that have been hardest hit ... sends a very loud signal, particularly in contrast to the position the church has taken, which is one of almost abandoning the flock,” Shirk said. (Full Story)

2.10.16

KPBS -- Bruneau is giving a lecture at the University of San Diego on the role neuroscience can play in the peacemaking process and he discusses the topic Wednesday on Midday Edition. (Full Story)

2.10.16

U-T San Diego -- In his testimony, Professor Robert Fellmeth, of the University of San Diego School of Law, explained “there are some clearly necessary regulatory systems,” but “a substantial portion” of California’s occupational-related rules impose “unnecessary barriers to entry” and “limit entry but thereafter fail to provide an assurance of competence.” (Full Story)

2.09.16

U-T San Diego -- The District Attorney’s Office has extended the deadline for applications to its Citizens’ Academy, a free course on criminal justice in San Diego County largely from the prosecution’s perspective.

The 10-week program is offered in partnership with the Sheriff’s Department and is held at the Joan Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice on the University of San Diego campus. (Full Story)

2.08.16

KPBS -- Derek Abbey, the Veterans Student Services coordinator for the University of San Diego, said the military hasn't set up women for success by giving them different physical fitness standards to meet than men.

"When you set up one group to meet one set of standards and another group with a different set of standards, there's going to be some friction established there," he said. (Full Story)

2.06.16

ABA Journal -- In the afternoon, participants returned to downtown Los Angeles for a discussion of what they’d seen and then a panel on issues in immigration law, hosted by professor Everard Meade of the University of San Diego’s Trans-Border Institute. Panelists discussed potential problems with an increase in “summary removals,” in which the immigrant waives the right to a hearing; incorrect ideas about immigration in national politics; an expected influx of Cubans crossing on foot from Mexico; and a trend toward prosecutorial discretion from ICE in the cases of law-abiding migrants whose families include U.S. citizens. (Full Story)

2.05.16

Bloomberg Business -- San Diego County's economy had a strong end in 2015, a study from the University of San Diego shows.

The monthly Index of Leading Economic Indicators found, among other things, the number of building permits increased in November and December.

The index from the Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate, released Thursday, looks at stock prices, unemployment claims and other factors to determine how the county is doing. (Full Story)

2.05.16

World Post -- Octavio Rodriguez, a legal researcher at the University of San Diego’s Justice in Mexico project, noted that surveillance of private citizens by Mexico’s intelligence services would fall outside the scope of the justice reform, since it's not part of a criminal investigation. Rodriguez noted that intelligence agencies commonly spy on the public in other countries, citing the recent controversies in the U.S. over the National Security Agency’s surveillance of private citizens. (Full Story)

2.05.16

U-T San Diego -- Q: Will the Federal Reserve begin charging “negative interest,” as Japan is doing, to stave off a recession and deflation?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

There is no history of having negative interest rates in the United States, and many people would have difficulty dealing with the concept -- paying the bank to hold your money. One of the reasons the Fed is increasing interest rates is to give it some flexibility in terms of monetary policy if there is a recession. By pushing them up now, they can be cut in the future should the economy go into a downturn. (Full Story)

2.05.16

Business Insider -- As much as US prosecutors may want to try him, and as anxious as Mexican officials are to be rid of him, the “reality is extradition takes a long time,” David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego and director of the school’s Justice in Mexico program, told Business Insider in the hours after Guzmán was recaptured on January 8.

“It’s a very complicated process … especially cases like this, where the individual in question has a lot of resources to challenge extradition in court.” (Full Story)

2.04.16

Fox 5 -- “This comprehensive strategy will result in implementable actions to reduce the San Diego region’s risks and vulnerabilities to coastal flooding, beach erosion and extreme weather events,” said Laura Engeman, the USD administrator who manages the collaborative. (Full Story)

2.04.16

KPBS -- A partnership of San Diego governments and organizations was awarded a $689,500 federal grant to protect coastal areas that could be endangered by El Niño and climate change, the University of San Diego announced Thursday. (Full Story)

2.04.16

KUSI -- The index rose 0.7 percent in November and 0.2 percent in December. Professor Alan Gin combined the reports because of the holidays, travel and beginning of the spring semester.

Sharp increases in residential building permits issued by local governments and an improving jobs picture helped lead the improvement.

The solid end of the year reversed a series of late-summer drops in the indicators. "The gains reinforced the view that the declines in the index from July to September suggested a slowing of growth in the local economy as opposed to a downturn,'' Gin said. (Full Story)

2.04.16

San Diego Business Journal -- The idea of this legislation was to make it easier to share important patient data from one hospital to another, said Jonathan Mack, a health information technology expert at the University of San Diego.

“There’s a communication problem in health care,” Mack said. “In hospitals, for example, you have many different systems — billing, bed management, labs — and none of them talk to each other.” (Full Story)

2.04.16

Times of San Diego -- A partnership of San Diego governments and organizations was awarded a $689,500 federal grant to protect coastal areas that could be endangered by El Nino and climate change, the University of San Diego announced Thursday.

The two-year grant the San Diego Regional Climate Collaborative received from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will focus on the north-central coast of San Diego County plus Imperial Beach. Both areas have significant private residential, business, and infrastructure investments that could be threatened, according to USD. (Full Story)

2.04.16

Village News -- Unfortunately, San Diego’s involvement in this repugnant crime wave is significant. A recent joint study by the University of San Diego (USD) and Point Loma Nazarene University estimated that underage and adult sex-trafficking victims in San Diego County number between 8,830 and 11,773 each year. (Full Story)

2.04.16

U-T San Diego -- Kevin Curran, Adjunct Professor at the University of San Diego

Kumeyaay natives lived in the San Diego region long before Juan Cabrillo sailed his Spanish galleon into San Diego Bay. By 1542, the Kumeyaay were settled throughout San Diego County, as well as Imperial Country to the east and Northern Baja to the south. (Full Story)

2.04.16

San Diego Business Journal -- The University of San Diego-backed index rose 0.7 percent in November and 0.2 percent in December, ending up at 139.8, the school said Thursday. The index had risen for 13 consecutive months through June, then dipped from July through September before levelling off. The index is now more than five percent higher than last December. (Full Story)

2.03.16

U-T San Diego -- Emma Doolittle, 21, history and sociology double major, University of San Diego

If it were just a shift from paper to electronic monitoring I would be completely in favor of the change towards using Fitbits for every student. But the implications are more far-reaching than that. (Full Story)

2.03.16

The Chronicle of Philanthropy -- $12 million to the School of Leadership and Education Sciences at the University of San Diego to launch its STEM Next program, which aims to promote science, technology, engineering, and math opportunities, particularly for low-income minority students, through improved teacher training, web-based learning, and more. (Full Story)

1.29.16

NBC San Diego -- The University of San Diego on Thursday announced it had received a $12 million gift from a nonprofit created by a co-founder of Intel to bolster science, technology, engineering and math education. (Full Story)

1.29.16

SD Metro -- The University of San Diego has received a $12 million gift from the Noyce Foundation to advance a national initiative — STEM Next — aimed at inspiring and preparing more young people, especially girls and those from underserved areas, for careers in science, technology, engineering and math. (Full Story)

1.29.16

NBC San Diego -- The academy begins March 24 and ends May 26. Classes will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Joan Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice on the University of San Diego campus. (Full Story)

1.28.16

Times of San Diego -- The University of San Diego Thursday announced a $12 million gift from the foundation of a Silicon Valley technology pioneer to boost the interest of girls and minorities in so-called STEM fields of study. (Full Story)

1.28.16

KUSI -- The University of San Diego received a big financial gift that will benefit the entire country, particularly young girls and children in under-served communities. (Full Story)

1.27.16

Sun Times Network -- The University of San Diego is taking over a highly praised program that a private foundation created to cultivate an interest in the sciences among the nation’s school children. The campus was chosen for the job by the Noyce Foundation of Los Altos, which also is giving USD $12 million to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) initiatives in many communities, including San Diego. (Full Story)

1.26.16

NBC San Diego -- During their Tuesday meeting, the supervisors discussed three new initiatives to fight the illicit industry, which is San Diego’s second largest underground economy after drug trafficking. A recent study by the University of San Diego and Point Loma Nazarene University showed human trafficking rakes in an estimated $810 million a year. (Full Story)

1.25.16

Fox 5 -- The University of San Diego’s business administration master’s program ranks 59th in the world and 28th best in the U.S., according to annual rankings published Monday by the London-based Financial Times.

The school’s MBA program — the only one in San Diego to appear in the top 100 — rose several notches from last year, when the school made its debut in the list. (Full Story)

1.22.16

NBC San Diego -- Teacher of the Month Julianna Tovar attended USD through its tuition remission program. Her father is a custodian at USD and she is the first in the family to graduate from college. (Full Story)

1.21.16

U-T San Diego -- Dineen, a left-handed center fielder, collected 78 hits in 46 games, batting .419 for the season. It was no fluke. He hit .394 as a sophomore and .411 as a junior, giving him a .409 average over his three-year career. Dineen is the only player in USD history with a career batting average over .400. (Full Story)

1.20.16

KPBS -- War, genocide and sex trafficking are just some of the issues being addressed by a group of high school students participating in the University of San Diego’s World Link Program.

The World Link Program works with about 2,000 high school students from San Diego and Northern Baja California to solve global problems and help save lives. (Full Story)

1.20.16

SD News -- Pacific Beach entrepreneur and University of San Diego Business School alumni Stephan Aarstol, and his company, Tower Paddle Boards, will be featured on ABC's “Beyond the Tank” airing at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 28 on San Diego's KUSI, Ch. 10. (Full Story)

1.19.16

NBC News -- The Constitution gave Congress that same authority through the power of naturalization, said Professor Michael Ramsey, of the University of San Diego School of Law. (Full Story)

1.17.16

Times of San Diego -- Everard Meade is the Director of the University of San Diego Trans-Border Institute

The official story of the capture of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán appears to be more fiction than reality.

The video of the dramatic raid — released exclusively to the pro-government Televisa Network and only in a heavily-redacted version — doesn’t match many of the details of the story provided to the public. There are missing bullet holes, gaps in the timeline, conflicting statements about the complaints that triggered the raid, and many other contradictions. (Full Story)

1.16.16

U-T San Diego -- “It’s an absolute mish-mosh of rules,” said Casey Dominguez, an assistant professor of political science at the University of San Diego, “a crazy quilt of rules.” (Full Story)

1.14.16

Our City San Diego -- “The current state of the San Diego economy is pretty good,” said Alan Gin, an associate professor of economics at University of San Diego’s School of Business. “The local economy is on a pace to add about 40,000 jobs this year, which would be the best annual job growth since 1999.” (Full Story)

1.14.16

U-T San Diego -- Workers staying in part-time jobs when they want full-time positions and wages going up much faster for high-earners than those at the bottom of the pay scale are some of the issues, experts said at the annual event at the University of San Diego and hosted by its business school. (Full Story)

1.14.16

The Atlantic -- They conclude that “the phrase ‘natural born Citizen’ in the Constitution encompasses all such citizens from birth.” Michael Ramsey of the University of San Diego, a careful scholar and a leading light of the serious “originalist” movement, argues in a recent paper that “[t]he proof . . . is much more difficult than conventional wisdom supposes.” But, he, too, concludes that “the best reading of the original meaning of the eligibility clause is that any person defined as a citizen at birth by the Constitution or a statute is eligible to the presidency.” (Full Story)

1.12.16

Bloomberg View -- But University of San Diego constitutional specialist Michael Ramsey, a former law clerk to Justice Antonin Scalia, put it well: “It’s a mystery to me why anyone thinks it’s an easy question.” (Full Story)

1.08.16

Fox News Latino -- "Approving Guzmán's extradition should be relatively quick," David Shirk, a political science professor at the University of San Diego and director of the Justice in Mexico project, told Fox News Latino. "The only concern is if he files an injunction that could delay the move." (Full Story)

12.31.15

U-T San Diego -- You could live in San Diego for years and never hear of the David W. May Gallery at the University of San Diego. It’s the very definition of a hidden treasure, a repository of several thousand pieces of Native American art and artifacts. Primarily used by USD’s anthropology department, it’s also open to the public and is now exhibiting “The May Collection: Twenty Works for Twenty Years.” (Full Story)

12.15.15

Thomas Nolan received his bachelor's degree in Theology & Religious Studies from USD in 2013.

Oiste -- Congratulations to the 2015 John F. Kennedy Volunteer Excellence Award Recipient: Thomas Nolan!

His secondary project at Fundacion Futuros Valores de Barranquilla, a foundation for orphan boys, has brought him even closer to the community. His involvement with the boys started with playing sports on the street and escalated to teaching regular English classes. The boys confide in him, and he will be truly missed when he leaves. He also has helped the Colombian employees plan and fund a new library on-site, for which he received a SPA grant. (Full Story)

12.11.15

U-T San Diego -- Q: Should the Federal Reserve raise short-term interest rates (currently 0-0.25 percent) and, if so, by how much?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: YES

The economy has improved a lot, with the unemployment rate now at 5 percent and with employment growth of over 200,000 a month. There is no sign of inflation, but raising interest rates would help forestall that. It would strengthen the dollar, which would reduce the costs of imports and help further with inflation. One other benefit would be to savers, who would earn more interest. I think the economy, including the housing market, could handle a quarter-point increase in rates without much difficulty. (Full Story)

12.11.15

Bloomberg -- Q: Should the Federal Reserve raise short-term interest rates (currently 0-0.25 percent) and, if so, by how much?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: YES

The economy has improved a lot, with the unemployment rate now at 5 percent and with employment growth of over 200,000 a month. There is no sign of inflation, but raising interest rates would help forestall that. It would strengthen the dollar, which would reduce the costs of imports and help further with inflation. One other benefit would be to savers, who would earn more interest. I think the economy, including the housing market, could handle a quarter-point increase in rates without much difficulty. (Full Story)

12.10.15

City Beat -- “Everyone’s a little testier than they used to be,” explained Carl Luna, a political-science professor at Mesa College and director of the Institute for Civil Civic Engagement at the University of San Diego. “Whenever the going gets tough, people get grumpy. For a big hunk of the population—even college-educated and above—you haven’t seen the quality of life go up as fast as everybody thought it was going to. The ’90s were the last time it was going good. (Full Story)

12.10.15

ABA Journal -- Scalia’s remarks also reflected arguments in an amicus brief by University of San Diego law professor Gail Heriot, Reuters reports. The brief said that “the nation now has fewer African-American physicians, scientists and engineers than it would have had using race-neutral methods” of admissions because of the higher drop-out rate for minority students in some demanding science programs. (Full Story)

12.10.15

ABC 10 News -- Real estate experts who spoke Thursday at the University of San Diego's Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate said it's supply, and not speculation, pushing up prices. (Full Story)

12.10.15

Business Insider -- University of San Diego law professor Gail Heriot wrote in one brief that "the nation now has fewer African-American physicians, scientists, and engineers than it would have had using race-neutral methods" because of the minority student dropout rate in some demanding science programs. (Full Story)

12.09.15

University Business -- “We wanted to create something to help empower students to understand and help them with their daily lives,” says Avi Badwal, senior director of enterprise technologies.

That something is Insight, an app built on the iOS platform that lets students organize coursework, extracurricular activities and personal tasks. (Full Story)

12.09.15

Reuters -- University of San Diego law professor Gail Heriot wrote in one brief that "the nation now has fewer African-American physicians, scientists and engineers than it would have had using race-neutral methods" because of the minority student drop-out rate in some demanding science programs. (Full Story)

12.08.15

The San Diego Reader -- I’m feeling like the best way to experience Handel’s Messiah is at a sing-along. My kids (ages 11 and 8) and I went to the Greater San Diego Music Coterie Chamber Orchestra and Chorus sing-along at the University of San Diego on Friday night. (Full Story)

12.07.15

U-T San Diego -- His background in history helps, he said. While Serbin's day job involves the history of Brazil, he has applied his historian skills to understand the background and history of Huntington's. And that historical background, and present-day progress, makes him optimistic.

"The dream is to make this a manageable condition, like diabetes or any number of conditions where people take medications on a regular basis, but their lives for the most part aren't affected," Serbin said. (Full Story)

12.07.15

San Diego Magazine -- The USD Founders’ Gala, named in honor of founders Bishop Charles Francis Buddy and Mother Rosalie Clifton Hill, raised a record amount of $685,000 on Nov. 14 to benefit the Founders’ Endowed Scholarship Fund. Honorary Chairs Andrew and Kim Busch along with USD President James T.Harris III DEd and Mary Harris welcomed guests to the Jenny Craig Pavilion where the event was held. The Legacy Sponsor was Coca-Cola. Heritage Sponsors included Bartell Hotels, CYMER, Shiley Foundation and US Bank. Swarovski sponsored the auction reception. (Full Story)

12.05.15

Bloomberg -- Q: Economically speaking, does San Diego County's economy benefit from increased online retailing?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: NO

Consumers would benefit from the convenience, so that may be a positive. To the extent that extra competition reduces prices, that would be a benefit, too. The problem is that jobs in retailing would be adversely affected as bricks-and-mortar stores reduce staff or close down entirely. Since San Diego is not a major distribution center for the online retailers, the retail jobs lost would not be offset by increased jobs in online retailing, so there would be a net loss of employment locally. (Full Story)

12.04.15

U-T San Diego -- Q: Economically speaking, does San Diego County’s economy benefit from increased online retailing?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

Consumers would benefit from the convenience, so that may be a positive. To the extent that extra competition reduces prices, that would be a benefit, too. The problem is that jobs in retailing would be adversely affected as bricks-and-mortar stores reduce staff or close down entirely. Since San Diego is not a major distribution center for the online retailers, the retail jobs lost would not be offset by increased jobs in online retailing, so there would be a net loss of employment locally. (Full Story)

12.04.15

U-T San Diego -- The nationally renowned actor-training program run jointly by the Old Globe Theatre and the University of San Diego has been renamed to honor two local philanthropists.

The two institutions have announced that the educational venture, which focuses on classical theater, is now known as the Shiley Graduate Theatre Program.

The new name pays tribute to Darlene Shiley and her late husband, Donald, longtime major donors to the program and the Old Globe, as well as other cultural causes around the county. (Full Story)

12.03.15

Education Dive -- The Old Globe and University of San Diego Master of Fine Arts in Theatre Program has been renamed as The Old Globe and University of San Diego Shiley Graduate Theatre Program in honor of Donald and Darlene Shiley.

"The new name reflects the Shileys' passion for the theatre and investment in The Old Globe and MFA program over the years," said University of San Diego Provost Andrew T. Allen. "Their tremendous support has allowed the Shiley Graduate Theatre Program to become one of the most acclaimed classical training programs in the United States." (Full Story)

12.02.15

Homeland Security News Wire -- To address the threats cyberattacks pose to the security, prosperity, and privacy of the United States and its citizens, the University of San Diego announced the creation of its Center for Cyber Security Engineering and Technology. The Center will focus on cybersecurity challenges through education, training, and research. (Full Story)

12.02.15

Bloomberg -- San Diego County's economy stopped its three-month slip in October, a study from University of San Diego shows.

The monthly Index of Leading Economic Indicators had dropped in July, August and September -- the first time three months had declined in a row since 2006. The index, released Tuesday, tracks local stock prices, unemployment claims, building permits, consumer confidence and other factors. (Full Story)

12.02.15

Business Insider -- But in recent decades, particularly starting in the 1990s, the Mexican military has played a more active role "in terms of how it’s deployed, but also [in] the national policies and policy-making framework,” said David Shirk, a professor at University of San Diego and the director of the school’s Justice in Mexico Project.

According to Shirk, as a result of this shift, the military has generally had a greater role "in determining domestic security matters." (Full Story)

12.01.15

Times of San Diego -- The University of San Diego said Tuesday its index of leading economic indicators for the metro area was unchanged in October and declining for three months.

“Three moves in a single direction in a leading index is what economists usually look for as a signal of a turning point in an economy,” said economist Alan Gin. “That the drop has been stopped at three months is encouraging and could suggest that a slowdown in the local economy in the coming year might be limited.” (Full Story)

12.01.15

KPBS -- The University of San Diego Burnham-Moores Institute for Real Estate's Index of Leading Economic Indicators for San Diego County was released Tuesday, and showed continued sluggishness in the region. (Full Story)

12.01.15

KPBS -- But Heather Lattimer said it's reasonable to believe Bersin is influencing the district today.

"In many ways you see a rebirth of some of the ideas and principles that were there at the time that Alan was in the superintendent role," Lattimer said. "And a lot of the people who are in leadership roles now are people who were part of that first group of peer coaches."

Lattimer is an associate dean at University of San Diego's School of Leadership and Education Sciences, and she helps run a training program for aspiring administrators that got its start with Bersin's help. (Full Story)

11.30.15

Communities Digital News -- To hold back the rising tide of cybersecurity breaches by meeting the demand for trained professionals in the field, the University of San Diego has announced the creation of the national Center for Cyber Security Engineering and Technology to address these challenges through education, training and research. (Full Story)

11.30.15

KPBS -- Wright will be in San Diego on Tuesday for a lecture at the University of San Diego on the challenges of getting to the truth while on the frontlines of a war. (Full Story)

11.27.15

U-T San Diego -- A study by the University of San Diego has found that food pantries throughout the county could do a better job in meeting the demands of the needy in the area.

The Caster Center for Nonprofit and Philanthropic Research’s study did not find that pantries were necessarily turning away hungry people. Rather, researchers found that many pantries were not following the most efficient practices in distributing food and making the best use of their resources." (Full Story)

11.25.15

U-T San Diego -- An October upsurge in multifamily construction starts reversed a decline over 2014 levels, said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego’s Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate. (Full Story)

11.25.15

San Jose Mercury News -- Robert Fellmeth is a Price Professor of Public Interest Law, Executive Director of Center for Public Interest Law, and Executive Director of Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego.

Former students at the disgraced and closed Corinthian Colleges in California have been left with little or none of the education they paid for but with tremendous debt. They are disproportionately veterans and former foster youth -- two groups warranting our respect and attention. Both groups are eligible for public grants and loans that drive aggressive recruiting by certain predatory private for-profit schools, which then impose their own private debt on these students. (Full Story)

11.24.15

Bloomberg -- University of San Diego economist Alan Gin said the county has seen a slowdown in the market because the local population is priced out. (Full Story)

11.24.15

U-T San Diego -- University of San Diego economist Alan Gin said the county has seen a slowdown in the market because the local population is priced out.

All other indicators that should boost home prices — a reduction in distressed properties, very low housing supply, job growth and low interest rates — are up.

“There’s a limit to how high prices can go,” he said. (Full Story)

11.23.15

U-T San Diego -- "By distorting inheritance across a whole population, the 'gene drive' technique is like supercharged selective breeding," said Fox, who teaches health law and bioethics at the University of San Diego.

"Applied to malaria-carrying mosquitoes, it promises to reduce human suffering by reducing the hundreds of thousands every year, mostly children, that the disease kills each year," Fox said. "That makes this technique deeply attractive. But it also risks unintended consequences: introducing dramatic changes to a native population has the potential to throw off a complex ecosystem in unknown ways." (Full Story)

11.22.15

Times of San Diego -- According to the recent annual report on the “State of Nonprofits and Philanthropy” by University of San Diego’s School of Leadership and Education Sciences, there are nearly 10,000 registered 501(c)(3) public charities in San Diego. (Full Story)

11.20.15

Bloomberg -- Q: Will SeaWorld's newly announced its plans to change to its killer whale show and build a new hotel improve the company's fortunes?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: YES

Changing the killer whale show won't have much impact, as activists are not likely to be assuaged by the action. But building a hotel could be a very lucrative endeavor. Hotels attached to amusement parks usually do very well, as visitors enjoy the experience and convenience of staying at the park they are planning on visiting. That would give SeaWorld another stream of revenue and the hotel should do pretty well, given its location near Mission Bay and the beaches. (Full Story)

11.20.15

U-T San Diego -- “You’re seeing strength throughout the labor market,” said Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego who calculates an index of leading indicators each month.

“People usually enter the workforce in the summer,” Gin said. “Normally, you actually expect the labor force to shrink as the school year begins.” (Full Story)

11.19.15

KPBS -- “Overall, San Diego food pantries are doing a good job providing food for those in our region who need it most,” said Mary Jo Schumann, director of the Caster Center, in a statement. “But there are many food pantries who have to limit their services or even close their doors to the hungry because they lack adequate infrastructure, finances or funding strategies." (Full Story)

11.18.15

Bloomberg -- Victor Fleischer, a law professor at the University of San Diego, said in an op-ed in the New York Times in August that by his estimates some of the schools are spending more annually on money management fees for their endowments than on financial aid for students. (Full Story)

11.18.15

The New Yorker -- Around two hundred and fifty thousand firearms are purchased each year to be trafficked, and U.S. and Mexican authorities are seizing only about fifteen per cent of them, according to a study by the University of San Diego and Igarapé Institute. (Full Story)

11.18.15

USD News Center -- Yet this is deserving of reflection and attention. Both Paris and Beirut are cosmopolitan cities that illustrate the possibilities of the richness of multiculturalism and diversity within the framework of shared values, such as the dignity of persons, respect and appreciation for difference, while also illustrating the need for a more inclusive compassion. (Full Story)

11.16.15

San Diego Business Journal -- Stanley McChrystal, the retired U.S. Army general, will speak about organizational leadership and his new book at 7:30 a.m. Friday, Nov. 20 at the University of San Diego. He is co-author of “Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World.” (Full Story)

11.16.15

Bloomberg -- Even though Apple won this class action under California's wage laws, it could still be exposed to disability discrimination claims, Orly Lobel, a professor of law at the University of San Diego, told Bloomberg BNA Nov. 9. (Full Story)

11.16.15

National Catholic Reporter -- Four speakers -- University of San Diego professor of religious studies Maria Pilar Aquino, Marquette University theologian Fr. Bryan Massingale, writer and NCR book editor Jamie L. Manson, and Benedictine Sr. Joan Chittister -- guided the more than 750 participants through the challenges that face the U.S. Catholic church in the next 50 years. (Full Story)

11.16.15

Los Angeles Daily News -- The University of San Diego recently completed a three-year study of human trafficking, one of the most comprehensive analyses of the issue to date. In interviews with 702 first-time offenders and 189 victims, researchers found that “perceived impunity” from law enforcement is a key driver of demand. (Full Story)

11.13.15

U-T San Diego -- Q: Will the new $339 billion transportation bill, passed by the House, speed important infrastructure in San Diego County?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: NO

San Diego’s biggest infrastructure needs include street maintenance and repair and projects such as expanding the convention center. The transportation bill focuses primarily on highways by replenishing the Highway Trust Fund, with special emphasis on “freight corridors.” It’s not likely that our local highways would be classified as freight corridors. There is also concern that the funding level is not adequate enough to put a dent in the backlog of deferred maintenance the country as a whole faces. (Full Story)

11.13.15

Bloomberg --  Q: Will the new $339 billion transportation bill, passed by the House, speed important infrastructure in San Diego County?

Norm Miller, University of San Diego

Answer: NO

Funding was not the problem in 2009 when federal stimulus funds were available for infrastructure. State government bureaucracy and environmental reports were the problem and nothing has changed. Last time, the state blamed the slow start on local governments and too many locally controlled projects, but it seems that our current local governments are keen to move forward. We will always take federal support but don't expect that to speed anything. (Full Story)

11.12.15

Washington Post -- Writing for “The Originalism Blog,” University of San Diego law professor Michael Ramsey is clear on the 14th Amendment and how it has been and should be interpreted.

"The first sentence of the Fourteenth Amendment conveys U.S. citizenship on all persons “born … in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof.” Obviously we are talking here about persons “born … in the United States.” Thus the children of illegal aliens are not U.S. citizens only if they are not “subject to the jurisdiction” of the United States." (Full Story)

11.12.15

U-T San Diego -- On Dec. 1, journalist and political analyst Robin Wright will be at USD as the next speaker in the Joan B. Kroc Distinguished Lecture Series. (Full Story)

11.11.15

The UCSD Guardian -- Researchers from the University of San Diego and Point Loma University released the results of a joint case study on San Diego’s underground sex trafficking economy last week. The study, funded by the National Institute of Justice, claims to have produced the first “credible” estimate of annual sex trafficking victims in San Diego county.

According to USD assistant professor and study co-author Ami Carpenter, her team put effort into avoiding common pitfalls that tend to affect studies of this nature.

“The study was basically designed to address shortcomings in other human trafficking studies,” Carpenter said in an Oct. 27 press release. “[Shortcomings include the] inability to produce credible estimates, lack of primary data on sex traffickers, over-reliance on qualitative methods and small sample sizes.” (Full Story)

11.09.15

San Diego Magazine -- Andrew and Kim Busch are Honorary Chairs of the University of San Diego Founders’ Gala which is being held at the Jenny Craig Pavilion University of San Diego. Funds raised will go to supporting student scholarships. The evening will feature the Swarovski Sparkle Station with 100 Swarovski crystal items available. Heritage Sponsors are Bartell Hotels, CYMER, USBank and Shiley Foundation. (Full Story)

11.09.15

KPBS -- University of San Diego's Justice in Mexico project director David Shirk discusses Mexico's Supreme Court ruling in favor of medical marijuana on KPBS Evening Edition with host Peggy Pico. (Full Story)

11.09.15

Santa Monica Lookout -- In Lecture Hall 165, Zahra Ismail, program officer at the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies at the University of San Diego, will present “Working Together to Support Civilians Affected by Violent Conflict.”

Ismail, who is a trainer in conflict resolution, will discuss “what she has learned from her experiences working abroad with non-government organizations (NGOs) supporting community level mediation, international development, human rights, and conflict resolution,” college officials said. The event is part of the Global Connections Lecture Series. (Full Story)

11.09.15

SD News -- USD students are organizing a 5K run to be held 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 14 at the Mission Point Park in South Mission Beach. The goal is to bring the USD and Mission Beach communities together to support a worthy cause. The event, “Strides For Survival,” benefits Shades of Pink and the Scripps Polster Breast Cancer Care Center. (Full Story)

11.09.15

Sun Times Network -- USD students are organizing a 5K run to be held 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 14 at the Mission Point Park in South Mission Beach. The goal is to bring the USD and Mission Beach communities together to support a worthy cause. The event, “Strides For Survival,” benefits Shades of Pink and the Scripps Polster Breast Cancer Care Center. (Full Story)

11.08.15

Bloomberg Business -- Q: Do you agree with a recent survey that says San Diego is the worst city to create wealth?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: YES

Undoubtedly, some people will be able to create wealth. But it is more difficult for the community as a whole to do so compared to other metropolitan areas around the country. One thing holding San Diego back is the high cost of housing. Large rent or mortgage payments make it difficult for people to build up savings. Other metropolitan areas face the same problem, but wages and income in San Diego also tend to lag behind those areas, due to the "San Diego discount." (Full Story)

11.07.15

National Catholic Reporter -- Three speakers -- University of San Diego professor of religious studies Maria Pilar Aquino, Marquette University theologian Fr. Bryan Massingale, and writer and NCR book editor Jamie L. Manson -- guided the more than 750 participants through the challenges that face the U.S. Catholic church in the next 50 years. (Full Story)

11.07.15

U-T San Diego -- Such attitudes have for years pervaded the public discussion. “Most Mexicans are far more conservative than people in the United States,” said David Shirk, a political science professor who heads of the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego. “The large majority of Mexicans believe marijuana should not be legal and have not used drugs in their life.” (Full Story)

11.07.15

U-T San Diego -- “The Franciscans had taken a vow of poverty. They didn’t want to control the land,” said Iris Engstrand, a history professor at the Catholic-affiliated University of San Diego.

“They came to save their souls. Right or wrong, they thought they were doing a good thing.” (Full Story)

11.06.15

Voice of San Diego -- Health care and education nonprofits – which include hospitals and colleges – employed two-thirds of local nonprofit employees as of 2013, according to University of San Diego’s Caster Family Center for Nonprofit and Philanthropic Research. (Full Story)

11.06.15

U-T San Diego -- The University of San Diego and San Diego State University have collaborated in the creation of a military awareness program for staff and faculty on their campuses. Military Ally educates staff and faculty on military culture, the tensions student veterans face and the appropriate approaches to take when working with this population. Student veterans are connected with the campus community and spend several hours learning about each other and how to find common ground. (Full Story)

11.05.15

Examiner -- Up to 11,733 victims of sex trafficking in San Diego County generate $180 million in annual revenue for traffickers there, making it the county's second largest underground economy after drug trafficking. These results were revealed in last month’s release of the first long-term, comprehensive study of its kind from University of San Diego and Point Loma Nazarene University with funding by the National Institute of Justice. (Full Story)

11.05.15

BBC -- "There is far less drug use in Mexico than in the US," says Dr David Shirk, director of the Justice in Mexico project at the University of San Diego. "There's also a more socially conservative outlook for drug use in Mexico and as much as it's a place for making and moving drugs, it's not been traditionally a place where drugs are widely consumed." (Full Story)

11.04.15

Del Mar Times -- There was big magic happening in the audience at the University of San Diego last week even before “Eat, Pray, Love’ author Elizabeth Gilbert took the stage to talk about her aptly named new book.

Women were bonding over their admiration for the best-selling author, sharing their stories and making dates for coffee. One woman asked a group of strangers to hold her seat while she ran to the restroom, and they laughed when she left her handbag but took her copy of “Big Magic.” (Full Story)

11.04.15

Voice of San Diego -- “In and of itself [a settlement] releases the defendant from all liability but it doesn’t prove anything as to the allegations – it doesn’t ‘completely discredit’ the claims although it could, absent anything else to the contrary, suggest that the case was weak,” Lobel said. (Full Story)

11.04.15

KPBS -- Watenpaugh will be one of six panelists at a University of San Diego public forum on the refugee crisis Wednesday night. (Full Story)

11.03.15

U-T San Diego -- Playwrights, filmmakers, poets, musicians and activists will be featured at the University of San Diego next week when the school presents an Art of Peace symposium.

Performances, exhibitions and workshops in the program are focused on demonstrating how the arts can be used to resolve conflict peacefully, deescalate violence, transform relationships, build capacities for peace and to support individual and community healing, according to the university. (Full Story)

11.02.15

The Sacramento Bee -- “They thought it was too prescriptive and would be penalizing doctors who are on probation for relatively minor violations or violations that are not related to practice of medicine, like not paying child support,” said attorney Julie Fellmeth, administrative director of the Center for Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego, who attended the hearing. (Full Story)

11.02.15

NBC San Diego -- Sex trafficking in San Diego County is a $810 million industry largely run by local gangs, according to a recent report by the University of San Diego and Point Loma Nazarene University. The report details how as many as 11,700 girls, who are on average 15-16 years old, fall victim to the lifestyle every year. (Full Story)

11.02.15

Voice of San Diego -- The University of San Diego’s Caster Family Center for Nonprofit and Philanthropic Research is a hub for local nonprofit data. The center’s annual and quarterly reports shed light on a sector that serves and employs tens of thousands of San Diegans. (Full Story)

11.01.15

Bloomberg -- Q: Could Cory Briggs' "Pay Your Own Way Initiative" resolve the debate over a new stadium and convention center expansion?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: NO

The plan is a good one and has brought together many groups that have been in conflict in the past. It may therefore solve the problem of the convention center expansion. But the boat may already have sailed with the Chargers. Although the proposal contains provisions that allow a downtown stadium, there is no mechanism for any public financing, and the Chargers seem intent on moving to Los Angeles. Plus the proposal's timeline seems beyond the timeframe required by the NFL. (Full Story)

10.31.15

U-T San Diego -- In what was described as the first and most comprehensive study of its kind in the U.S., researchers from the University of San Diego and Point Loma Nazerene University estimated there are 8,830 to 11,773 underage and adult sex-trafficking victims in the county per year. They come from all socio-economic and racial backgrounds, and 98 percent are female. (Full Story)

10.31.15

U-T San Diego -- The discussion seemed to be a potential turning point to Julianne D’Angelo Fellmeth, director of the Center for Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego. She has been monitoring the medical board for nearly three decades, work that included writing a scathing audit that helped lead to the cancellation of a widely derided board program to rehabilitate doctors with drug, alcohol or mental problems.

She said Friday’s back-and-forth demonstrated a new level of traction for the public on issues that have been simmering for years.

“I think Consumers Union did a terrific job making their case,” D’Angelo Fellmeth said. (Full Story)

10.31.15

U-T San Diego -- To highlight the disparity in funding, Foster pointed to a recent University of San Diego study that found that although 44 percent, or 190 of the county’s 429 arts nonprofit organizations are in North County, they receive only 28 percent — about $77 million — of the total $273 million in revenue countywide each year. (Full Story)

10.29.15

U-T San Diego -- The index, released Thursday, has shown declines the last three months, which the study said was a turning point in the local economy. The last time there was a downturn lasting more than three months was in 2006.

“It’s a little bit worrisome,” Alan Gin, author of the study, said. “In this case, it could be a negative turning point. I think what this means is we could see a slowdown in terms of the growth of economic activity.” (Full Story)

10.29.15

Times of San Diego -- The University of San Diego‘s index of leading economic indicators has slumped for the third month in a row.

Professor Alan Gin of the university’s Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate said Thursday the index declined 0.9 percent in September after a 0.6 percent fall in August and 0.3 percent dip in July

He said the latest two months saw major reductions in building permits, as well as negative moves in unemployment insurance, local stock prices and help-wanted advertising. (Full Story)

10.29.15

MSN -- The natural human tendency to fit complex facts into a simple, compelling narrative has grown stronger in the digital age of 24/7 news and social media, said Frank Partnoy, professor of law and finance at the University of San Diego, and author of “Wait: The Art and Science of Delay,” which explores the perils of hasty decision-making.

“We’re deluged with information even as pressure has grown to make snap decisions,” Professor Partnoy said. “People see a TED talk. They hear this amazing story of a 30-something-year-old woman with a wonder procedure. They see the Cleveland Clinic is on board. A switch goes off and they make an instant decision that everything is fine. You see this over and over: Really smart and wealthy people start to believe completely implausible things with 100 percent certainty.” (Full Story)

10.29.15

NBC San Diego -- Preliminary research released Monday by the University of San Diego and Point Loma Nazarene University found an underground industry in San Diego County, largely run by gangs, victimizing more than 8,000 minors a year.

Researchers estimate the trafficking brings in $810 million in annual revenue for pimps and what researchers call sex trafficking facilitators. (Full Story)

10.29.15

KPBS -- The University of San Diego Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate's Index of Leading Economic Indicators has slumped the past two months, Professor Alan Gin said Thursday.

The index declined 0.6 percent in August and 0.9 percent in September, the second and third straight months of drop-offs, Gin said.

"The index tends to be a little bit leading in terms of its time frame, so this is suggesting that maybe in the second half of 2016, that we need to worry about things slowing down," Gin said. (Full Story)

10.28.15

U-T San Diego -- "Driver's education is extremely important, not just for kids but for parents and everyone else," said Robert Fellmeth, a public interest law professor at the University of San Diego and a child advocate. "I can't think of a course where having live teachers on the ground is more important." (Full Story)

10.28.15

KPBS -- "I didn’t expect the number to be this high myself, but I’m fully confidant in our methods," said Ami Carpenter, a co-author on the study “Measuring the Nature and Extent of Gang Involvement in Sex Trafficking in San Diego,” which was funded by the National Institute of Justice.

Data for the study was collected from interviews with 1,205 people including gang members, first-time prostitution offenders, human trafficking survivors and school administrators. (Full Story)

10.27.15

Voice of San Diego -- The University of San Diego released a shocking study Monday, finding as many as 11,700 girls and young women are involved in a local $810 million underground sex trafficking industry, run mostly by street gangs. (Full Story)

10.27.15

760 KFMB -- As many as 11,700 mostly underage girls fall victim to sex trafficking in San Diego County each year in an $810 million industry run largely by gang members, according to preliminary research released at the University of San Diego on Monday. (Full Story)

10.27.15

Bloomberg -- University of San Diego economist Alan Gin agreed with the report's findings.

"It's really costly to live here (and) the levels of pay are not high compared to other metropolitan areas in the state," he said. "It's what we used to call, 'The San Diego Discount.'" (Full Story)

10.26.15

KPBS -- Despite the changes to incentive programs, the solar industry is nowhere near demise, according to Scott Anders, director of the Energy Policy Initiatives Center at the University of San Diego. The price of solar panels has plummeted in recent years, he said, and efficiency continues to improve.

"There will be consolidation in the solar market. There will be mergers and acquisitions. ... Maybe growth will slow," Anders said. "But I think the mid- and long-term outlooks are good. That’s not great consolation for a company now trying to make payroll, or trying to figure out what their (second quarter) looks like in 2016. (But) I don’t think solar’s going to go away." (Full Story)

10.26.15

U-T San Diego -- As many as 11,700 mostly underage girls fall victim to sex trafficking in San Diego County each year under an $810 million industry largely run by gangs, according to preliminary research released by the University of San Diego Monday.

The study, “Measuring the Nature and Extent of Gang Involvement in Sex Trafficking in San Diego,” offers the most thorough look at one of the most understudied aspects of human trafficking in the U.S.: the relationship of street gangs as facilitators of sex trafficking. (Full Story)

10.26.15

KUSI -- KUSI interview with Marianne Waldrop, Marine Col. (Ret.) USD Ph.D. as she shares her thoughts on women in combat rolls in the military. (Full Story)

10.26.15

U-T San Diego -- According to a new Department of Justice-funded study from the University of San Diego, "Our methodology has produced San Diego County’s first credible estimate of sex trafficking victims/survivors per year: 8,830 - 11,773 of whom 1,766 came into contact with law enforcement." It pointed to an estimated $810 million in annual revenue from the underground sex economy involving 100 gangs. (Full Story)

10.26.15

NBC San Diego -- In an underground industry largely run by gangs, more than 8,000 underage victims a year fall prey to sex traffickers in San Diego County, drawing in an estimated $810 million in annual revenue for pimps and what researchers call sex trafficking facilitators.

These are the findings of preliminary research released Monday by the University of San Diego and Point Loma Nazarene University. (Full Story)

10.26.15

U-T San Diego -- Carl Luna, a University of San Diego political scientist, said Monday that Newsom has a steep challenge.

“You don’t usually go from a local position like that to the head of a big city without some interim steps to show you have the experience to do it,” Luna said. “To think that a very unknown local leader is going to vault up ahead of a fairly established Republican incumbent is quixotic at best.” (Full Story)

10.26.15

U-T San Diego -- University of San Diego economist Alan Gin agreed with the report’s findings.

“It’s really costly to live here (and) the levels of pay are not high compared to other metropolitan areas in the state,” he said. “It’s what we used to call, ‘The San Diego Discount.’” (Full Story)

10.26.15

Fox 5 -- Researchers from the University of San Diego and Point Loma Nazarene University have found an average of 10,000 girls a year are involved in the sex trafficking industry in San Diego.

They also discovered that many of them are underage and recruited at high schools around the county. (Full Story)

10.26.15

NBC Los Angeles -- Researchers found that 85 percent of pimps and sex trafficking facilitators were involved with a gang, some of those gangs with close ties to Mexican cartels, said Dr. Ami Carpenter, the lead researcher on the ““Measuring the Nature and Extent of Gang Involvement in Sex Trafficking in San Diego.” (Full Story)

10.25.15

National Review -- But the stinging minority rebuttal by Civil Rights Commissioner Gail Heriot, a law professor at the University of San Diego, noted that the commissioners in the majority consistently failed to get their facts right. “It is said that where there is smoke, there is fire,” she wrote. “But sometimes where there is smoke, there is only a smoke-making machine, busily stoked by publicists working for activist organizations.” (Full Story)

10.25.15

Investopedia -- Yet, Victor Fleischer, a law professor at the University of San Diego, found that private equity fund managers of university endowment funds, including Yale’s, Harvard’s, the University of Texas’, Stanford’s and Princeton’s, received more in compensation for their services than students received in tuition assistance, fellowships and other academic awards. He claims that Yale paid out $343 million to private equity managers in carried interest alone while only $170 million of the university’s operating budget was aimed at assisting students. (Full Story)

10.25.15

Bloomberg -- Q: Should restaurants ban tipping and instead raise meal prices so they can pay their workers a higher wage?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: YES

Eliminating tipping and raising wages would reduce the pay disparity between the wait staff and the others that work in restaurants. It would also provide more income stability for many waiters, as not all of whom work great shift times in high end restaurants with generous customers. Data shows the link between tipping and quality of service is tenuous. For women servers, research shows that more important factors affecting the level of tips are age, hair color, body size, and breast size. (Full Story)

10.23.15

U-T San Diego -- Norm Miller is the Hahn Chair of Real Estate Finance at the University of San Diego, Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate

Recently I attended a meeting in Fallbrook, the potential site of a new development called “Lilac Hills Ranch,” which includes 1,700 or so housing units with some retail.

This little town of fast-food joints, grocers and convenience stores, a few “antique” shops and tractor supplies feels it is under attack by the German blitzkrieg of developers. One group aimed at preserving the countryside called and one aimed at saving the planet from climate change both agreed that they want what they had while growing up, far away from the city lights. (Full Story)

10.22.15

U-T San Diego -- Here is Devyn Bryant, a vibrant USD cornerback, describing his class schedule, which consists of five classes and two labs.

“Dynamics, which is a really intense physics class,” Bryant, a junior mechanical engineering major, begins.

Then there’s “Applied Thermodynamics,” an analysis of how power plants work, and “Engineer and Material Science,” which is “just the science of materials and how you make them to fit your engineering needs,” Bryant continues, casually, as if he is describing how to find something in the grocery store. (Full Story)

10.20.15

Global Trade -- The Supply Chain Management Institute at the University of San Diego is celebrating the Fall Forum’s 30th anniversary with special events that are expected to attract over 250 attendees, representing more than 80 organizations.

To mark the occasion, SCMI put together a stellar program of great speakers from well-known and respected companies, and have organized a variety of interactive breakout sessions, each led by subject matter experts. (Full Story)

10.19.15

Military Mondays -- Listen to the Military Mondays interview with Derek Abbey, the Veteran Student Services Coordinator at the University of San Diego (Full Story)

10.18.15

Bloomberg Business -- Q: Will lifting the ban on exporting U.S. crude oil lead to higher prices?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: NO

The market for oil is a worldwide market where the oil sold is fungible. There is a total global demand and a total global supply, and it doesn't matter where the transactions occur. Oil exported from the U.S. means less supply for U.S. refineries, but would also put further downward pressure on world oil prices. A bigger factor in terms of oil prices is the weakening global economy in general and the slowing in China in particular, which will keep prices low. (Full Story)

10.16.15

U-T San Diego -- The director of the University of San Diego’s real estate center, Norm Miller, estimates 30 percent to 40 percent of renters in the city are severely impacted by rent increases — not just seniors or those on Section 8.

He said a lack of new housing being built the past few years was a time bomb waiting to happen and local governments are still hesitant to approve smaller, high-density apartments — opting more for two bedrooms or bigger. (Full Story)

10.16.15

KUSI -- KUSI News talks with Len Simon, USD Adjunct Professor of Law (Full Story)

10.15.15

MSN News -- How does the United States allow hundreds to die on the Southern border each year? And why does the country deport thousands of veterans? US border expert David Shirk talks politics and history of a rough border. (Full Story)

10.14.15

FreeNewsPos.com -- Political scientist and border expert David Shirk from the University of San Diego has been closely following the U.S.-Mexico border issues. Life Links reporter Gönna Ketels talked to him about immigration policy and the situation of deported veterans. (Full Story)

10.13.15

Los Angeles Times -- "AT&T missed a huge opportunity with this customer," said Andrea Godfrey Flynn, an associate marketing professor at the University of San Diego. "They may have jeopardized a long-term relationship and could end up driving him to a competitor." (Full Story)

10.13.15

Houston Chronicle -- Your sign is your salesperson on the street. It speaks to passersby and informs them of your product or service. More than any other form of advertising, a business sign has the best return on investment. According to a study conducted by the University of San Diego School of Business Administration, it was the business owner's signage, not improvements, word of mouth or other forms of advertising, that was responsible for attracting 10 new walk-in customers during a week's period. Of those 10 new customers, a minimum of six additional sales resulted. (Full Story)

10.12.15

Bloomberg -- Q: Are rents rising so high that home buying becomes a viable option for many tenants?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: NO

While rents have increased, so has the price of owner-occupied housing. The median house price is up over 4 percent compared to last year, bringing the median price to $485,000. Because of that, monthly mortgage payments have also risen. One positive is that interest rates have remained low, which allows some people to make the jump from the rental market to home ownership. But a big barrier remains accumulating enough wealth to get a down payment, particularly with wage growth still slow. (Full Story)

10.08.15

Justice in Mexico -- On October 8, 2015, Justice in Mexico launched a new report that provides a deep analysis of the current process of judicial reform in Mexico. The Criminal Procedure Reform in Mexico 2008-2016, by authors Octavio Rodríguez Ferreira and David A. Shirk, analyzes the process of implementing judicial reform in Mexico as well as the impacts of the reform on the federal and state level, as well as some of the past, present and future challenges to implementation efforts. (Full Story)

10.07.15

Bloomberg Business -- “Private equity is concerned about the shock value,” said Victor Fleischer, a law professor specializing in tax policy at the University of San Diego. “You have to worry that if you’re Calpers, what the response is going to be. At the end of the day, this is public money that’s being invested.” (Full Story)

10.06.15

Yahoo! Finance -- Still, private-equity firms, which control roughly $3 trillion worth of assets, benefit the most. Tax expert Victor Fleischer of the University of San Diego estimates that private equity firms account for 70% of all income declared as carried interest, with hedge funds, real estate and venture capital accounting for roughly 10% each. (Full Story)

10.06.15

Forbes -- One such critic is University of San Diego law professor Victor Fleischer, who recently penned an op-ed for the New York Times entitled “Stop Universities From Hoarding Money.”

Fleischer begins by pointing out that in 2014, Yale paid some $480 million to fund managers who handled only $8 billion of the university’s $20 billion endowment. But in that same year, it devoted only $170 million of its spending to tuition assistance, fellowships and prizes. (Full Story)

10.06.15

New Republic -- Carson seems convinced that he'd act heroically in the face of danger, but the Republican presidential candidate shouldn't be so sure of himself, says Dr. Nick Ladany, dean of the School of Leadership and Education Sciences at University of San Diego and a former psychology professor.

“It strikes me as a very simpleminded approach to how someone would respond to a crisis,” Ladany told me. “We can fantasize all we want about how we might react, but until you’re in the situation you really don’t know.” (Full Story)

10.06.15

Fox News -- Gail Heriot, University of San Diego law professor and expert on Prop 209, told The College Fix the scheme does appear to violate the law.

“If the initiative is as described in the university’s announcement, it is a straightforward violation of Proposition 209,” Heriot said. (Full Story)

10.05.15

Washington Examiner -- The "loophole" will result in more than $15 billion in lower revenues for the federal government over the next 10 years, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation, which estimates tax legislation for Congress. It's possible, however, that the cost to the government could be far higher. Victor Fleischer, a law professor at the University of San Diego, estimates that taxing carried interest as ordinary income would raise $180 billion over the same time. (Full Story)

10.05.15

U-T San Diego -- Annually, the Women PeaceMakers Program brings four notable women to the Linda Vista campus for two months of speeches and seminars, seeking effective strategies and tactics for moving beyond conflict and war.

The quartet are notable for their “courage and unique voices,” said Patricia Marquez, dean of the Kroc School of Peace Studies. “Each woman peacemaker joins USD to share narratives of kindness, wisdom and action to change situations of terrible violence and oppression." (Full Story)

10.04.15

The Bulletin -- “The distinction didn’t matter so much in the 1960s when the number of immigrant residents was low,” noted Gail Heriot, a professor at the University of San Diego Law School. “It matters a great deal now in Texas and many other states.” (Full Story)

10.03.15

U-T San Diego -- Babka, Ph.D, is an associate professor of theology and religious studies at the University of San Diego.

On March 13, 2013, some of my students and I were in my office at USD, curious to see who would emerge on the balcony of St. Peter’s. When Cardinal Bergoglio appeared, in a simple white cassock, without the mozzetta, an ermine-trimmed crimson cape that is a traditional sign of authority, I realized something was different. (Full Story)

10.03.15

The Courier-Journal -- “Players say, “We’re the show. We need to get paid,’ ” said Len Simon, who has taught sports law at Duke, USC and the University of San Diego. “Kessler says, ‘They should get fair market value.’ The response from the NCAA has always been -- and it divides smart people almost 50-50 -- that this is college sports. We created it with certain rules. We’re entitled to run our sport.” (Full Story)

10.03.15

U-T San Diego -- Aryaman Madireddy always knew he wanted to leave his native India to study abroad. That day came in August, when the 18-year-old arrived at the University of San Diego.

An avid sailor with an interest in business, it seemed like a fitting choice.

“The University of San Diego is supposed to have one of the best business schools in the world, so this was a very good decision,” he said. “It’s been a very welcoming experience.” (Full Story)

10.02.15

Inside Higher Ed -- Stephen Pultz, assistant vice president of enrollment management at the University of San Diego, said his institution changed because early action was creating as many problems as it was solving. So many students were applying without necessarily having a clear commitment to the university that it was impossible to predict yield, the percentage of accepted applicants who enroll. Early applicants were being deferred in large numbers, leaving them hanging even though only 20 percent would be offered admission. "We weren't serving students well," Pultz said. (Full Story)

10.02.15

CBS News -- "Extraditions are not a good measure of relations overall, but I think it's symbolic especially for people working in law enforcement. It's been seen in recent years as an important metric," said David Shirk, associate professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

10.02.15

ABC 10 News -- "Extraditions are not a good measure of relations overall, but I think it's symbolic especially for people working in law enforcement. It's been seen in recent years as an important metric," said David Shirk, associate professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations at the University of San Diego. "For those who felt relations had gone downhill, that drop in extraditions seemed to be significant." (Full Story)

10.02.15

The College Fix -- “If the initiative is as described in the university’s announcement, it is a straightforward violation of Proposition 209,” Gail Heriot, University of San Diego law professor and expert on the proposition, told The Fix in an email.

“The university tried to have Proposition 209 repealed,” said Heriot, also a politically independent member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and former civil rights counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee. “When it failed at that, it simply went ahead and instituted a program in violation of the law.” (Full Story)

10.02.15

KJZZ -- “I wouldn’t say there isn’t a consensus yet,” said Scott Anders, who directs the Energy Policy Initiatives Center at the University of San Diego.

He said there are a host of studies and, unsurprisingly, the findings vary widely depending on who conducted them. But rooftop solar is, in a sense, the "canary in the coal mine."

“It’s about all distributed energy resources, so you have solar, you have storage, electric vehicles," Anders said. "The question is, how do you balance their interests — the homeowner, the business owner, etc. — with the interests of the grid?” (Full Story)

10.01.15

Global Trade -- “We’re designed for the working professional,” says Lauren Lukens, director of MS-SCM for the School of Business Administration at USD. The 25-week program is conducted primarily online, but with five residences—three- to four-day, on-campus classes that provide the opportunity to participate directly with professors and other students from the individual’s cohort. What’s a “cohort?” It’s the student’s group of partners he or she works with for the program’s duration while putting together an individual project. (Full Story)

9.30.15

Tax Analysts -- "Under Trump's plan, fund managers would restructure the carry as an 'incentive fee' -- like many hedge funds use -- and qualify for the 15 percent business income tax rate. And management fees and other fees would qualify for the new lower rate as well," Victor Fleischer, a law professor at the University of San Diego, told Tax Analysts. (Full Story)

9.28.15

Washington Post -- Matt Zwolinski is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of San Diego, and co-director of USD’s Institute for Law and Philosophy.

Too often in the United States, welfare comes with strings attached. Yes, Americans are willing to help the poor; but they aren’t quite willing to trust them. After all, a lot of Americans still believe that people fall into poverty because there’s something wrong with them. Poverty is the material reflection of an internal moral failure. (Full Story)

9.28.15

KPBS -- Ev Meade, director of Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego and Marco Amaral of Raices sin Fronteras discuss the underlying issues revealed by disappearance of the 43 students Monday on Midday Edition. (Full Story)

9.24.15

San Diego Free Press -- Karma Lekshe Tsomo, a Buddhist leader and Professor of Theology at the University of San Diego, speaks to the same issues in basic human terms: “The connections between climate change and social and economic justice are so clear — they all turn on compassion.” (Full Story)

9.24.15

Huffington Post -- Many more weapons crossed the border from the United States illegally. In 2013, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms traced 10,488 firearms recovered at crime scenes in Mexico back to U.S. manufacturers or sales. A University of San Diego study estimated that a quarter of a million firearms were purchased annually in the United States to be trafficked into Mexico from 2010 to 2012. These numbers dwarf the disastrous "Fast and Furious" program by which ATF allowed hundreds of weapons purchased in Arizona to cross into Mexico in 2009 and 2010. (Full Story)

9.23.15

Smithsonian -- Jeffrey M. Burns, a Serra scholar who directs the University of San Diego’s Frances G. Harpst Center for Catholic Thought and Culture, says that Serra and his fellow missionaries measured success in terms of souls saved. “Serra offered the native people membership in the missions in exchange for eternal life,” says Burns. “He would have seen everything at the mission as the native people’s property, something he was holding in trust for them. It may not have worked out that way, but that’s how he understood it.” (Full Story)

9.22.15

U-T San Diego -- Dr. Iris Engstrand, a history professor at the University of San Diego with an expertise in Spanish Southwest history, said Serra’s mission to spread Christianity is often clouded in misconceptions.

His efforts to convert indigenous peoples to Catholicism were “humanitarian” and a genuine effort to save their souls, she said. (Full Story)

9.22.15

U-T San Diego -- When Art Hughes arrived in San Diego in 1971, the educator faced a formidable challenge in overseeing the merger of two small Catholic colleges into the coeducational University of San Diego.

The boards of the San Diego College for Women and the San Diego College for Men and School of Law had agreed to unite, and they sought an outside educator to lead the way. They found their leader in Mr. Hughes, who at the time was in his 10th year as a professor and administrator at Northern Arizona University.

Mr. Hughes went on to a 24-year presidency at USD, steering the university through a period of unprecedented growth during which the institution’s academic reputation soared, gaining local and national prestige. (Full Story)

9.21.15

Bloomberg Business -- Most states rely on a combination of property taxes, sales taxes and personal and corporate income taxes to raise funds.

"It is fairer to rely on all three types of taxes than to rely on only two, as the application of three tends to even out the tax burden," said Herbert Lazerow, a law professor at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

9.18.15

Bloomberg Business -- Q: Do the arrival of Syrian refugees in Europe and possibly the U.S. offer an economic upside to the host countries and communities?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: YES

The benefit is likely to be greater for Europe than for the United States. That is because population is growing much slower in Europe. In some countries, population is actually projected to decline. The influx of refugees could help alleviate labor shortages. The benefit is less for the U.S. as it already allows a significant amount of immigration, which helps boost population growth. To the extent that the refugees use public services, the net gain would be low and possibly even negative. (Full Story)

9.18.15

Times of San Diego -- The University of San Diego welcomed four women from around the world to campus Friday for the 2015 Women Peacemakers Program.

The women, who hail from Afghanistan, Namibia, Israel and South Africa, began their two-month residency this week at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice.

The annual campus initiative pairs each of the women with a professional journalist who records their stories of survival and work to find peace amidst violence and conflict, according to USD.

The program has been documenting the stories and best practices of international women leaders involved in human rights and peacebuilding since 2003. (Full Story)

9.18.15

Times of San Diego -- Katherine Stuart Faulconer, a small business owner and wife of San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, will open the Hera Venture Summit at 8:30 a.m. at the University of San Diego.

“The event will allow women in all stages of business — from the pioneers in the startup ecosystem to venture financing — to present their collective knowledge in a powerful and rigorous one-day format,” said Dr. Silvia Mah, event chair and founder of Hera Labs, one of the organizations presenting the event. (Full Story)

9.17.15

The Tribune -- Commissioner Gail Heriot, a law professor at the University of San Diego, said the report needs to be taken “with a grain of salt.” She said the majority of the commissioners appear to have made their conclusions before even embarking on their investigation.

Heriot joined the commissioners on a visit to the Karnes detention center. She said she met with mothers and children who were well fed and well cared for.

Heriot agreed that federal authorities need to do what they could to prevent long-term detention, but she said often that’s out of authorities’ control. She cited a backlog in the courts and pointed out that sometimes it’s the women’s attorneys who are asking the court for more time to gather evidence about their clients’ cases. (Full Story)

9.17.15

Los Angeles Times -- “The chairman's statement suggests that the treatment of detainees is comparable to torture,” wrote Commissioner Gail Heriot, a law professor at the University of San Diego.

“Lots of ugly rumors are uncritically repeated — like the presence of maggots in the food served by detention center kitchens, sexual assaults, deaths, etc. Some of the rumors were investigated by DHS and others and found to be untrue or very unlikely, but the commission's report doesn't bother to mention those investigations. In no case did the commission undertake an investigation to determine the truth or falsity of a rumor it reported,” she wrote. (Full Story)

9.16.15

SD Metro -- Digital walls and screens, interactive retail technology and faster textbook sales also are new features of the 6,665-square-foot campus store that will be officially dedicated today at noon in front of the Hahn University Center.

“We’ve created an exciting and futuristic space that will provide enhanced convenience, shopping options and service for our students, staff, alumni and visitors,” said Andre Mallie, assistant vice president for auxiliary services. (Full Story)

9.15.15

Times of San Diego -- An exhibit of works by Wayne Thiebaud, a renowned California artist noted for his pop art-style paintings and prints of common objects like cakes and toys, opens Friday at the University of San Diego.

This exhibition in the Robert and Karen Hoehn Family Galleries spans the breadth of Thiebaud’s career, from landscapes and figure studies, to the familiar and iconic images of cakes and commodities, to his recent studies of Northern California waterways. (Full Story)

9.10.15

KUSI -- Lea Hubbard chairs the learning and teaching department at the University of San Diego.

"Obviously some people are making money on these tests, and making money on curriculum, and of course that's true," she said.

But Hubbard said one test score overlooks the big picture of Common Core, which will strengthen writing and critical thinking skills.

"We have a lot of challenges, kids come with a lot of needs, and teachers need support to be trained to address those needs," she said. (Full Story)

9.07.15

ABC 10 News -- "San Diego is on pace to add almost 50,000 jobs compared to where we were last year. That would be the best year to year job gain since 2000,” said University of San Diego Economics Professor Alan Gin.

The top five industries include hospitality and tourism, retail, business services, healthcare services, and education and training.

Gin says another growing sector is the professional, scientific and technical services which encompasses lawyers, architects, engineers and researchers. (Full Story)

9.04.15

The Deal -- Until recently there hasn't a lot of discussion among legal experts over whether Obama could take action on his own. But Victor Fleischer, a University of San Diego law professor, began examining ways an administration could act unilaterally to treat carried interest as ordinary income after the White House took steps in 2014 and 2015 to carry out other parts of its agenda through executive actions.

"Administrative agencies have a lot of discretion when there is an area of law that is ambiguous," Fleischer said. "They can interpret the law in a way that is reasonable and consistent with congressional intent, and I see some possibilities here." (Full Story)

9.03.15

The New York Times -- Victor Fleischer, a law professor at the University of San Diego, created a stir last month when he estimated that five prominent universities with big hedge fund and private equity portfolios — Yale, Harvard, Princeton, Texas and Stanford — paid their managers more than they gave out in financial aid to students. (Full Story)

9.03.15

USA Today -- In a recent New York Times op-ed that set Twitter, well, atwitter, University of San Diego law professor Victor Fleischer argued that some elite universities are getting that balance wrong.

In the piece he explained “endowments are exempt from corporate income tax because universities support the advancement and dissemination of knowledge. But instead of holding down tuition or expanding faculty research, endowments are hoarding money.” (Full Story)

9.02.15

San Diego Reader -- That’s right. Those huge institutions — which we rescued with trillions of our dollars during the 2007–2009 Great Recession — are just as inscrutable, just as opaque, just as incomprehensible as they once were.

That’s the view of Frank Partnoy, professor of law and finance at the University of San Diego and the founding director of the university’s Center for Corporate and Securities Law. (Full Story)

9.02.15

The Atlantic -- As Orly Lobel, a professor of employment law at the University of San Diego, has shown, non-compete clauses may prevent a manager from joining a rival firm—or even any similar firms in the industry—for a period of months or years after they depart. Comprehensive non-disclosure agreements also diminish mobility: It may be hard to propose projects at a new employer knowing that they could trigger litigation alleging that they’re imitating past work. (Full Story)

9.02.15

The Boston Globe -- Chen’s ruling “will very much impact other jurisdictions even though the case is California law,” said Orly Lobel, a law professor at the University of San Diego. In lawsuits over whether workers are independent contractors or employees, all US courts, state and federal, use a similar test to weigh the “economic reality” and whether the worker is controlled by the employer in the sense of being hired, directed, or fired, Lobel said.

“The question of whether Uber drivers are employees will be determined by the very specific context and the particular circumstances of their relationship with Uber,” Lobel said. (Full Story)

9.01.15

KPBS -- Home values sink the closer the properties are to a campus, especially a private school, according to professors Stephen Conroy and Andrew Narwold, and associate professor Vivek Sah, of USD's Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate.

They based their conclusions on more than 20,000 residential housing sales in 2010-11 in San Diego County.

Homes located within 500 feet of a school sell for about 6.7 percent less than other neighborhood homes, the authors said.

The net negative becomes even starker when a home is situated near a private school. In that case, homes within 500 feet experience of such a campus a 14.4 percent decrease in sales price.

"Public schools are often more accessible and open to surrounding homes, allowing homeowners to benefit from proximity more than private schools," Sah said. "Additionally, private schools often draw from student populations that live far away, increasing traffic congestion to nearby residents." (Full Story)

9.01.15

U-T San Diego -- The index, which is designed to yield insights into future activity, fell 0.4 percent to 139.6.

“I’m a little worried, but … you need three months in one direction to indicate a turning point that the economy is changing direction from up to down,” said Alan Gin, the USD economist who produces the index. (Full Story)

9.01.15

U-T San Diego -- “East Asia is huge on symbolism, perhaps the Japanese people in particular,” said Yi Sun, University of San Diego professor of East Asian history. For example, the nation was thrilled in 2013 when Caroline Kennedy was named ambassador because of her presidential lineage. “With the name association, the fact that the USS Reagan is going to Japan, it’s going to be really, really enthusiastically received both by the government and the populace in general,” Sun said. (Full Story)

8.31.15

Times of San Diego -- After 13 straight months of increases, the University of San Diego Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate’s Index of Leading Economic Indicators for San Diego County fell 0.4 percent in July, a USD professor said Monday.

Five of the six sectors of the index were lower, especially those involving employment, Alan Gin said. He said consumer confidence and the outlook for the national economy were also down.

According to Gin, initial claims for unemployment insurance jumped above the 16,000 mark for the first time since August 2014, while help-wanted advertising hit its lowest level since last October. The drops have not been reflected yet in the local labor market, where the seasonally adjusted local unemployment rate was 5 percent in July, he said. (Full Story)

8.25.15

KPCC Radio -- While most people in Mexico will feel the sting, those who receive remittances from the U.S. will remain better off, said David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego who studies U.S.-Mexico relations. (Full Story)

8.25.15

PACE-TV -- Dr. Patricia Márquez, Dean of the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace & Justice, Peace Studies Program at the University of San Diego, is interviewed by Ginny Robinson from San Diego's PACE-TV. (Full Story)

8.10.15

BBC News -- Investigators said his fingerprints had been found at the crime scene and matched to a database which showed he had a criminal record for rape and assault.

But Emily Edmonds-Poli, associate professor of political science at the University of San Diego and author of a paper on violence against journalists in Mexico, is sceptical.

"That's so old-hat in Mexico, you pick up the nearest criminal and you accuse them of the crime," she said.

"I don't believe anyone is fooled by that," she added. (Full Story)

8.10.15

Wall Street Journal -- Smaller customers that don’t have well-established relationships with ocean carriers could see their shipments held back, said Joel Sutherland, director of the Supply Chain Management Institute at the University of San Diego’s business school.

Even a small amount of delayed cargo can have a far-reaching impact, he added. For example, manufacturing companies waiting on key components could be forced to shut down temporarily.

“Everything backs up,” Mr. Sutherland said. “You could have some stock-outs, you could have some promises that aren’t met.” (Full Story)

8.10.15

U-T San Diego -- “In terms of peacekeeping in and around Europe, Africa and the Middle East,” said Topher McDougal, a professor at the University of San Diego’s Kroc School of Peace Studies, “you see a lot of military use by the French, but a great reluctance by the Germans to do that.” (Full Story)

8.06.15

KUSI -- KUSI News speaks with Dr. Jim Harris, the new president of the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

8.06.15

Forbes -- Experts are broadly skeptical of the Clinton plan. University of San Diego law professor Vic Fleischer called it “more show horse than workhorse.” In particular, Fleischer wrote, “it would do little to accomplish its stated goal of aiming at what Mrs. Clinton called ‘the tyranny’ of today’s earnings report.” (Full Story)

8.04.15

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, the University of San Diego economist who puts together the study, said this one month could just be an aberration in the data.

"There is still a positive outlook for the local economy," he said. "Until we get more negative news I think we've got to project that we’ve got a strong local economy at least through the first of next year." (Full Story)

8.04.15

Village News -- The University of San Diego Burnham-Moores Institute Center for Real Estate’s Economic Indicators for June, which was released today, August 4, showed an increase of 0.4 percent.

The climb, the smallest since August of last year, was led by gains in the number of residential building permits that were issued in the region, the outlook for the national economy and local stock prices, USD professor Alan Gin said.

He said those gains offset a dip in the jobs picture and drop in consumer confidence. Those declines were small and could easily turn around, he said.

“The outlook for the local economy remains strong for the rest of the year and likely through at least the first half of 2016,” Gin said. “The local job market has been strong through the first half of this year.” (Full Story)

8.04.15

KPBS -- The climb, the smallest since August of last year, was led by gains in the number of residential building permits that were issued in the region, the outlook for the national economy and local stock prices, USD professor Alan Gin said.

He said those gains offset a dip in the jobs picture and drop in consumer confidence. Those declines were small and could easily turn around, he said. (Full Story)

8.04.15

San Diego Business Journal -- The index, compiled by associate professor Alan Gin, increased 0.4 percent. It was the lowest gain since last August. The index has grown for the past 13 consecutive months, though the growth rate has consistently fallen since March, when it reached 1.3 percent.

The modest figure was largely due to strong gains in residential housing units authorized by building permits and the overall national economy.

Three of the index’s factors — initial claims for unemployment insurance, consumer confidence and help-wanted advertising — all saw small declines. Those drops could easily reverse course by the end of the year, according to Gin. (Full Story)

8.04.15

Times of San Diego -- The University of San Diego‘s local index of leading economic indicators rose by 0.4 percent in June, though it was the smallest increase in almost a year.

Economist Alan Gin at the Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate noted that the number of declining components matched the number of advancing ones for the first time in a year.

“But the drops in the declining components were small and could easily turn upward in the months ahead,” he wrote in his report, adding that “the outlook for the local economy remains strong for the rest of the year and likely through at least the first half of 2016.” (Full Story)

8.03.15

The Advocate -- Open records allow lawmakers, advocates and members of the public to determine whether agencies are providing adequate services to children in danger, said Amy Harfeld, the national policy director for the Children’s Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law and coauthor of “State Secrecy and Child Deaths in the U.S.,” the study that graded each state.

“We can only fix what we know is broken,” she said. “If states are not disclosing what they should, who’s going to do something about it?” (Full Story)

7.29.15

Financial Planning -- Other experts in nonprofit governance share that view.

"It's very unchecked," Miranda Perry Fleischer, a professor at the University of San Diego law school, says of nonprofit power. "It can be very hard for courts to intervene." (Full Story)

7.29.15

Telemundo 33 -- La profesora de historia de la Universidad de San Diego (USD), Iris Engstrand, recordó que el explorador portugués Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo logró levantar trece barcos en un periodo de cinco años.

“Él no tenía herramientas que tenemos ahora, no sé como podía hacerlo”, comentó.

“No tenía a la Guardia Costera mirando todas las cosas, solamente los nativos de San Salvador y Guatemala podían ayudarle”, agregó. (Full Story)

7.29.15

The Courier-Journal -- “It was a huge tactical blunder ...” said Len Simon, who has taught sports law at Duke, USC and the University of San Diego. “Anything was better than destroying the phone.” (Full Story)

7.29.15

San Diego Magazine -- Susannah Stern is a professor of Communication Studies at the University of San Diego

What’s it like teaching a class on teenagers to teenagers?

It’s fascinating. Most of the students in the course are seniors, but there are sometimes a few juniors or sophomores. The class is a true exchange—we all end up learning from one another. What I offer is the research and theory. What students offer is personal experiences in contemporary society and up-to-date understanding of popular trends and media. We spend the first few weeks of the semester discussing the social construction of the “teenager” itself—a designation that isn’t even a century old yet. We also discuss the stereotypes about teenagers, and the ways our media contribute to those stereotypes. (Full Story)

7.28.15

Business Insider -- Students at these schools are three times more likely to drop out than their counterparts at American Bar Association (ABA) accredited law schools in the state.

“They are failure factories,” Robert Fellmeth, the Price Professor of Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego School of Law, told the Times. “They’re selling false hope to people who are willing to put everything out there for a chance to be a lawyer.” (Full Story)

7.28.15

Times of San Diego -- Everard Meade is the Director of the University of San Diego Trans-Border Institute

The assertion that the alleged murderer, Francisco López Sánchez, had committed “seven felonies” is misleading at best. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, better known as ICE, describes him as a “repeat felon” because he committed offenses that count as “aggravated felonies” for the purposes of U.S. immigration law, a category which includes misdemeanors under criminal law. (Full Story)

7.27.15

U-T San Diego -- “Most people think density is good, as long as it’s in somebody else’s neighborhood,” said Alan Gin, economist at University of San Diego. (Full Story)

7.27.15

MIT Technology Review -- In schools across the United States, chalk and textbooks are disappearing. In their place are tablets and laptops. This technological transformation is only just beginning, but it stands to reshape the ways teachers teach and students learn. In 2015, school systems will spend an estimated $522 million on tablets and readers, and $4.7 billion on IT overall. “Districts are trying to be very, very thoughtful about how they do this,” says Scott Himelstein, executive director of the University of San Diego’s Institute for Entrepreneurship in Education. “Obviously they don’t want to be in a situation like LAUSD.” (Full Story)

7.27.15

Los Angeles Times -- Robert Fellmeth, a law professor at the University of San Diego and executive director of the Center for Public Interest Law and the Children's Advocacy Institute, hailed the ruling as consistent with voters' intent. Nothing in the campaign for or against the measure suggested it was for adults only, he said.

"Under what rationale do we select out a 15-year-old for a more condemnatory consequence than a 32-year-old?" Fellmeth said. (Full Story)

7.27.15

The Motley Fool -- But are we really in store for a collapse of the housing market? Only in certain parts of the country, says a new study conducted by real estate experts Norm Miller, Hahn Chair of Real Estate Finance in the School of Business Administration's Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate at the University of San Diego (USD), Michael Sklarz, president of Collateral Analytics and Jim Follain, senior vice president for research and development at Collateral Analytics. (Full Story)

7.27.15

Frontline -- The article contains research compiled by the University of San Diego Justice in Mexico Project

Some counts have blamed the drug war for as much as 55 percent of all homicides. Others have put the estimate as low as 34 percent. Yet those figures have likewise been criticized as unreliable. For example, someone killed by a high-caliber or automatic firearm would be counted as a victim of organized crime, but if they were strangled or stabbed to death, they would not necessarily be considered a casualty of the drug war. (Full Story)

7.25.15

U-T San Diego -- As this happens, the U.S. will likely see a shift in the demographics of its unauthorized population, with fewer people coming for jobs and more people fleeing desperate, violent situations in their native countries, said Ev Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. The country’s recent influx of Central American unauthorized immigrants is an example of that, he said.

“What I think we’re going to see with the undocumented population is we’re going to see more people coming for complicated issues,” Meade said. “I think it’s changing the profile a little bit.” (Full Story)

7.24.15

PBS Newshour -- Robert Muth is a former officer in the Marine Corps. He runs a legal clinic for veterans at the University of San Diego.

ROBERT MUTH, University of San Diego: It looks like you have a corporate entity buying access to look like the preferred or the selected educational provider for the veterans or soon-to-be veterans at a base. (Full Story)

7.22.15

Bloomberg Business -- The “modest move” by the Internal Revenue Service would stop some of the most abusive maneuvers by private-equity firms, said Victor Fleischer, a tax law professor at the University of San Diego.

“The regulations strike me as more taxpayer-favorable than I would have expected,” he said. “The regulations try to accommodate some arrangements that are common in the industry and that in my view ought to be treated as payments for services,” taxed as ordinary income. (Full Story)

7.22.15

U-T San Diego -- Everard Meade is the Director of the University of San Diego Trans-Border Institute

If Mexico had extradited Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera to the United States he would not likely be at large. Nor, however, would it have made a dent in the drug war, or the mythical status of its charismatic leaders.

Containing larger-than-life figures like El Chapo will remain an illusion so long as policymakers on both sides of the border use high-profile arrests to mask an overwhelming reality of violence and corruption, rather than addressing it head on. (Full Story)

7.20.15

El Universal -- “Las autoridades estadounidenses han exagerado el daño causado por este llamado enemigo público número uno aquí y este tipo de declaraciones, para mí, insulta a los que han sufrido lo peor de la violencia de la guerra del narco, que claramente están en México”, dice Ev Meade, director del Trans-Border Institute de la Universidad de San Diego. (Full Story)

7.18.15

U-T San Diego -- David Shirk is an Associate Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the University of San Diego and the Director of the Justice in Mexico Project

The capture of Joaquín “El Chapo (Shorty)” Guzmán in February 2014 was lauded at home and abroad as one of the most important accomplishments of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, who restored Mexico’s longtime ruling party to power after a 12-year hiatus. However, on July 11, 2015, Guzman escaped from Mexico’s top maximum-security prison.

Now, one of Peña Nieto’s greatest feats is widely seen as his greatest failure, and a possible setback to U.S.-Mexico relations. Since Guzmán’s escape through a 1.5-kilometer ventilated tunnel, pundits are debating who is to blame and what comes next in the fight against Mexican organized crime. (Full Story)

7.17.15

NBC News -- There is another problem: biological systems don't always scale up or down. The amount of oxygen we take from the air, the food we digest, the heat we give off; these all depend on the surface area of our organs and the mass of our bodies.

"It's not as simple as saying, 'Oh, everything will shrink down and stay proportional,'" Michel Boudrias, biomechanics expert and chair of the environmental and ocean sciences department at the University of San Diego, told NBC News. (Full Story)

7.17.15

U-T San Diego -- “It’s a pretty good combination of high paying sectors,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “It’s a good situation when the high paying sectors are leading the way. That should help the other sectors of the economy.” (Full Story)

7.17.15

GlobeSt.com -- Despite speculation to the contrary, Norm Miller, PhD, Ernest W. Hahn Chair of Real Estate Finance in the School of Business Administration’s Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate at the University of San Diego, says we are far from bubble territory on a national or metropolitan level. While US home prices are increasing on a national level more than expected, suggesting a definitive recovery from the recession and causing some experts to speculate mistakenly that another bubble is in our midst, Miller refutes this. (Full Story)

7.17.15

On Point -- Interview with Trans-Border Institute Director Everard Meade (Full Story)

7.16.15

KOGO News Radio -- Norm Miller spoke with KOGO News Radio on the housing market (Full Story)

7.16.15

Bigger Pockets -- But are we really in store for a collapse of the housing market? Only in certain parts of the country, says a new study conducted by real estate experts Norm Miller, Hahn Chair of Real Estate Finance in the School of Business Administration’s Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate at the University of San Diego (USD), Michael Sklarz, president of Collateral Analytics and Jim Follain, senior vice president for research and development at Collateral Analytics.

Pooling new research from almost 400,000 neighborhoods and 20,000 surrounding zip codes across the country, Miller and his co-authors detail their findings in a white paper called, “Is a New Home Price Bubble Forming?” In the study, they focus on defining the characteristics of a “bubble” and finding economically sound ways of evaluating the intrinsic value of homes so as to take a more accurate look at where we are in terms of market sustainability. (Full Story)

7.15.15

BLKDMNDS -- “He’s different from some who might want to be feared but aren’t trying to build a territorial dynasty,” says Everard Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. A businessman with a military mindset, El Mencho has focused on tightening and lengthening his supply chain, and demolishing competitors or anyone else who might get in the way. (Full Story)

7.15.15

U.S. News and World Report -- "Express congressional approval seems very unlikely," says Michael Ramsey of the University of San Diego School of Law, who disagrees the review act essentially ratified the deal. "Assuming Congress won't expressly approve, the deal can only be a nonbinding one, which this president can implement to the extent of his statutory and constitutional authority [and] future presidents can refuse to follow."

But even if the deal is a nonbinding executive agreement under domestic law, Ramsey says, it's possible that it's binding under international law.

"You can't claim domestic invalidity to get out of an international deal," he says. The key to evaluating if the deal is binding internationally, he says, is the intent of parties, which can partially be gleaned by the strength of written commitments. (Full Story)

7.15.15

National Post -- Extraditions to the United States had dropped to 54 in 2013 from 115 in 2012, according to U.S. government figures compiled by Justice in Mexico, a research project at the University of San Diego in California. The joint operations center in Mexico City, where officials from both countries are supposed to work together, often included no one from the Mexican government, or just a few people, with dozens of cubicles left empty in a tall glass tower. (Full Story)

7.15.15

San Diego 6 News -- Some parts of San Diego's real estate market are entering bubble territory and could pop in the next recession, University of San Diego real estate expert Norm Miller said Wednesday.

The trend in San Diego and a few other cities where the market is being driven by high valuations of tech stocks counters what's happening around the country, which is far from being in a bubble, said Miller, the Hahn Chairman of Real Estate Finance in the School of Business Administration's Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate. (Full Story)

7.14.15

KPBS -- Alan Segui, a political science professor and international studies professor at the University of San Diego, said some Filipino-Americans tend to vote Republican because of their military connection. After World War II and until 1992, Filipinos could get American citizenship by enlisting in the U.S. military, typically the U.S. Navy. But the Filipino-American community today is slightly more Democratic than Republican, he said. (Full Story)

7.14.15

Yahoo! News -- All this chaos and change has given El Mencho his chance: He’s shown a foxlike dexterity for adapting to circumstance, whether it’s switching allegiances or moving to meth from heroin — all while going unseen. Indeed, while he hasn’t gotten much press outside Mexico, El Mencho and his Cártel de Jalisco Nueva Generación have expanded territory from coast to coast, becoming the most global of all the Mexican suppliers. “He’s different from some who might want to be feared but aren’t trying to build a territorial dynasty,” says Everard Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

7.14.15

The Washington Post -- That logic is simple: Social media carries with it certain risks and some doubt that the 60-year-old Guzmán, known for his caution, would use it personally. David Shirk, an associate professor at the University of San Diego and the director of the Justice in Mexico project, points out that it would be "foolish" for any high-ranking cartel member to post to social media personally, and that generally it is only "younger, inexperienced individuals" who use the networks like Twitter so flagrantly. (Full Story)

7.14.15

OZY -- The Mexican drug trade has long existed, of course, but the past 15 years have seen a deadly shift in the balance of power. When Mexico had a one-party political system, the government could more easily set the terms with cartels, Meade says. Typically, the exchange went like this: The government promised to leave cartels alone so long as its agents got their cut. But in 2000, the political system opened up to multiple parties, giving cartels more leverage. (Full Story)

7.14.15

MSN News -- Instead of the government taxing the drug runners, it’s now the other way around: “The cartels set the terms,” says Meade. And their use of violence has shifted too. Murder is no longer a way of shielding the black market from public view; it’s become a tool “to terrify local governments and people into submission,” Meade says. According to numbers from Human Rights Watch, about 60,000 people were murdered in Mexico between 2006 and 2012, a death toll El Mencho is only accelerating. (Full Story)

7.14.15

KPBS -- Ev Meade, the director of University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute, said people in Mexico are now snickering over Guzman's latest escape.

"It's an almost ironic celebration of the fact that he showed the ineffectiveness of the Mexican government once again," Meade said. "But that very quickly turns to outrage and indignation. People feel like this is a national shame, that a country that has great hopes for itself has not achieved what it wants to achieve regarding citizenship and democracy." (Full Story)

7.13.15

Fox 5 -- When “El Chapo Guzmán” escaped from prison on Saturday the Trans-Border Institute, based at University of San Diego took notice.

The USD has programs and personnel working in Culiacán, Sinaloa where Guzmán’s drug cartel is based.

“We have close partnerships with a number of organizations in Culiacán. We teach there,” said Dr. Everard Meade, Director of the Trans-Border Institute. “We heard from them yesterday. There’s heart-felt concern, worry and a lot of fear because people don’t know if city is going to turn into war zone.” (Full Story)

7.10.15

KUSI -- KUSI News speaks with Winnie Callahan, director of USD's Center for Cyber Security Engineering and Technology (Full Story)

7.09.15

CBS News -- Yet even in such a rigidly controlled environment, from what types of clothes prisoners wear to when they wake up in the morning, inmates are finding ways to meet their needs through entrepreneurial ventures, according to a new study from Ronald Paul Hill and Michael Capella of the Villanova School of Business and Justine Rapp at the University of San Diego and published in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing. (Full Story)

7.09.15

U-T San Diego -- “It helps and it hurts,” said Alan Gin, an economist at the University of San Diego. “It helps because we can ship stuff up there but why locate down here anyway if you’re just going to ship out of LA?” (Full Story)

7.09.15

Sacramento Business Journal -- California requires active attorneys to take 25 hours of legal education classes every three years. Some states require 45. “Twenty-five hours is pathetic,” said Julie D’Angelo-Fellmeth, administrative director of the University of San Diego’s Center for Public Interest Law. There’s no requirement that includes a lawyer's field of practice. (Full Story)

7.08.15

U-T San Diego -- “The cost of living is so high here, particularly rents,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “Americans have among the lowest savings rates in the world, because we’re a consumer society.” (Full Story)

7.08.15

KUSI -- KUSI spoke with University of San Diego Economist Alan Gin, who said the Chinese stock market is experiencing these huge swings because the bubble of over-inflated stock prices is finally bursting. (Full Story)

7.07.15

U-T San Diego -- Katie Ferraro, a registered dietitian and assistant clinical professor at the University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing and Health Sciences, said many people mistakenly use the terms “overweight” and “obese” interchangeably, but they are two distinct categories.

She said a person is overweight if they have a Body Mass Index (BMI) — a measure of body fat based on height and weight — of 25 to 29.9. Those with a BMI of 30 or higher are considered obese. On average, a BMI of 30 translates into a person being about 40 pounds overweight. (Full Story)

7.07.15

Science Daily -- "The men at Gramercy quickly come to understand that the formal system of exchange, from public provision of goods and services to the commissary, is primarily responsive to needs of third parties such as guards, politicians, voters, and suppliers. The needs and desires of the incarcerated men themselves are often neglected, and so the prisoners themselves take entrepreneurial steps to meet them," write the authors Ronald Paul Hill (Villanova Business School), Justine Rapp (University of San Diego), and Michael L. Capella (Villanova Business School). (Full Story)

7.06.15

KUSI -- KUSI News speaks with Alan Gin, Associate Professor of Economics (Full Story)

7.02.15

Bloomberg Business -- If Alsup sides with the workers, Apple will probably settle the case rather than risk a trial, said Orly Lobel, a law professor at University of San Diego who specializes in labor and employment issues.

“I don’t see it as a ‘threat’ to Apple in the larger scheme of things but certainly if class is certified it would likely end in some settlement and Apple would have to change some of its calculations of wage and hour pay to certain categories of employees,” Lobel said. (Full Story)

7.01.15

Fortune -- That’s how it should be, argues Orly Lobel, a professor at the University of San Diego School of Law. “If there was ever a competitive market,” she says, “it should be applied to our greatest resource today: talent.” (Full Story)

6.30.15

KPBS -- The index stood at 139.7 in May, the highest mark since December 2006, according to data supplied by Professor Alan Gin.

The monthly hike was the 12th in a row for the index, but the size of the increase — 0.5 percent — was the smallest since last October, Gin said.

He said it was also the first time since August of last year that two components fell in the same month. Consumer confidence dropped by a small amount, while stocks in San Diego-based companies were lower, despite gains in the overall markets. (Full Story)

6.30.15

The Washington Post -- Victor Fleischer, a professor of tax law at the University of San Diego, said releasing only some tax information portrays a mixed message about how Bush earned his fortune.

“If you got rich from starting a business and it is successful, that is to be commended,” Fleischer said. “If you got rich because your parents were rich and gave you access to economic opportunities others didn’t have, or you got rich from trading on your political access, that is troubling.” (Full Story)

6.26.15

U-T San Diego -- Q: Must taxes be raised to fund the ever-increasing bill for infrastructure and deferred maintenance throughout the country?

ALAN GIN, UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO

Answer: YES

The problem of deferred maintenance keeps getting worse the longer it is put off. For some items such a road and bridge repair, there is a safety issue at play. On top of that maintenance, there are infrastructure needs such as expansion of the San Diego convention Center that are important to the economy. Some would argue that cuts should be made elsewhere to fund these expenditures, but austerity measures at the state and local level have already slowed the recovery from the Great Recession. (Full Story)

6.24.15

U-T San Diego -- “I think that the Great Recession has caused a change in people’s attitudes,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “The American dream of home ownership has declined.” (Full Story)

6.19.15

U-T San Diego -- “People are getting more money and they’re more stable in their job situation,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “Rather than going out and buying a big-ticket item, one of the first things people do is eat out more.” (Full Story)

6.18.15

GlobeSt.com -- Vivek Sah, University of San Diego

As far as green REITs go, technically there are no green REITs—you have to self-declare as a green REIT. You have to show that you’re buying buildings that are LEED certified or seeking LEED certification. There are some green REITs that have shown better operating performance, but it’s hard to prove. If someone buys an office building that’s LEED certified and they get higher rents, they can’t prove that they’re doing better because the building is green. The same is true for sales—some green buildings sell for higher, and some don’t. Until it becomes a law that every building has to be LEED certified, builders may not have the inventive to put more dollars into construction costs because they might not see the ROI. Still, there’s a big trend in that direction, but there’s a lack of data on the performance of these buildings. (Full Story)

6.18.15

U-T San Diego -- "What you get paid reflects your own unique circumstances," said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. "The data gives a benchmark. You can use it as a guidepost in terms of determining what you might want to ask and present it as data that supports it." (Full Story)

6.17.15

San Diego Newscape -- "The Advanced Certificate in Intellectual Property and Regulatory Affairs program offers an opportunity for midlevel managers who oversee intellectual property and government regulatory processes and procedures in life science companies to become better trained in both matters," said Stephen C. Ferruolo, dean of USD School of Law. (Full Story)

6.16.15

ABC 30 News -- "What a way to honor Tony," said USD coach Rich Hill, who played with Gwynn in college. "I think this is going to be the best college baseball tournament in the country. Teams are already lining up to play in it." (Full Story)

6.12.15

U-T San Diego -- Q: Do you agree with the International Monetary Fund that the Fed should wait until next year before increasing interest rates?

ALAN GIN, UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO

Answer: YES

Other than the dip in first quarter GDP, most national economic indicators are looking good. The labor market is particularly strong, with 280,000 jobs added in May and good wage growth. So the U.S. economy may not need much more stimulus, but there are problems internationally in Europe and in China. Keeping the U.S. economy strong will help the global economy and benefit U.S. workers. Inflation is a concern, but the core rate of inflation is still under control at 1.8 percent through April. (Full Story)

6.10.15

Times of San Diego -- Pat Libby, a University of San Diego professor and expert on charities, said nonprofit services like day care, private schools and cultural institutions help businesses support and attract employees.

“We can’t take credit for the weather, but the fabulous things that nonprofits do enable business to do what it does,” she said.

Libby spoke at the 97th annual meeting of Jewish Family Service of San Diego, an agency which provides financial, social, emotional, physical and spiritual support to individuals of all religions in San Diego and the Coachella Valley. (Full Story)

6.05.15

Business.com Media, Inc. -- " ... Colleges and universities have created salary-negotiating workshops to teach soon-to-be female graduates how to negotiate effectively. “Students exiting college need to have an understanding of how the wage gap affects them personally,” Erin Lovette-Coyler, director of the University of San Diego’s Women’s Center told UT San Diego." (Full Story)

6.05.15

Sydney Davis lives life passionately. Whether she’s studying for her biology classes, observing giraffes in the African bush for a research thesis or catching leopard sharks for an internship, Davis approaches every project with spirit and vigor.

But Davis’s biggest passion is undeniable: animals. As a biology major and chemistry minor, Davis spent much of her undergraduate career working directly with all types of creatures. In addition to a hands-on research internship with Scripps Institute of Oceanography in which Davis caught, tagged and tracked sharks, she also spent four months in Kenya on a Wildlife Management Course through one of USD’s renowned study abroad programs. In fact, the program helped Davis discover new passions.

“I got to be really close with the wildlife there, and I learned about the issues between humans and wild animals. I became very passionate about conservation, but I still wanted to become a veterinarian. My advisor [from the program] is a veterinarian for elephants and he said, ‘It’s possible to do both.’ So that’s what I plan on doing.”

6.05.15

Sydney Davis lives life passionately. Whether she’s studying for her biology classes, observing giraffes in the African bush for a research thesis or catching leopard sharks for an internship, Davis approaches every project with spirit and vigor.

But Davis’s biggest passion is undeniable: animals. As a biology major and chemistry minor, Davis spent much of her undergraduate career working directly with all types of creatures. In addition to a hands-on research internship with Scripps Institute of Oceanography in which Davis caught, tagged and tracked sharks, she also spent four months in Kenya on a Wildlife Management Course through one of USD’s renowned study abroad programs. In fact, the program helped Davis discover new passions.

“I got to be really close with the wildlife there, and I learned about the issues between humans and wild animals. I became very passionate about conservation, but I still wanted to become a veterinarian. My advisor [from the program] is a veterinarian for elephants and he said, ‘It’s possible to do both.’ So that’s what I plan on doing.”

6.04.15

Reason.Com -- But the problem with the Paulsen-Whelan approach, as University of San Diego law professor Michael Ramsey points out, is that it would render "every branch a law unto itself, which seems inconsistent with the framers' idea of a written Constitution to check the branches' tendency to wrongfully augment their power and of an independent judiciary to keep the political branches within their constitutional boundaries." (Full Story)

6.02.15

Fortune -- “Companies here go after competitors’ talent, and I’ve been arguing that’s a good thing since it allows knowledge to flow,” says Orly Lobel, a University of San Diego law professor.

She praises California’s ban on non-compete clauses, saying her research shows how states that limit or forbid such clauses are more innovative than those that enforce them. (Full Story)

5.28.15

WPR -- According to Justice in Mexico, a research program based at the University of San Diego, between 15,649 and 20,670 homicides took place in Mexico in 2014. Although this marks a decrease of 9 to 15 percent from 2013, the historic low of 8,867 killings in 2007 remains distant. Of course, any figure on violence in Mexico should also be taken with precaution: In 2013, Mexico’s National Institute for Statistics and Geography estimated that 87 percent of crimes were in fact not reported, and 92 percent were not investigated. Violence has significantly decreased in cities like Acapulco, Chihuahua and Ciudad Juarez, but other states, like Jalisco, have seen the reverse. (Full Story)

5.27.15

KPBS -- Wednesday on Midday Edition, Ev Meade, director of the University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute and Lilia Velasquez, an immigration and naturalization attorney and an adjunct professor, at California Western School of Law review details of the ruling and how people who were eligible for DAPA in San Diego County will be affected. (Full Story)

5.26.15

KPBS -- San Diego County's unemployment rate hit a near eight-year low of 4.8 percent, according to the California Economic Development Department.

The county's rate is less than the state's unemployment rate, which is 6.1 percent. The government statistics don't count the individuals who have stopped looking for work, but only those actively seeking a job.

Alan Gin, professor of economics at the University of San Diego and author of USD's Index of Leading Economic Indicators, discusses the job market on Monday's KPBS Midday Edition. He'll explain what the latest unemployment figures really mean for San Diego's economy. (Full Story)

5.25.15

KPBS -- Iris Engstrand, a University of San Diego history professor, has written about San Diego during its war years and recalls experiencing the war firsthand as a small child. (Full Story)

5.22.15

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said he considers growth in the construction sector and the professional, scientific and technical services as key to continued success in the economy. Construction jobs create a ripple effect, leading to more consumer spending and the hiring of contractors. Meanwhile, the professional, scientific and technical services include the high-paid researchers, lawyers and architects, who spend more money in the economy. (Full Story)

5.19.15

Men's Health -- We’re big proponents of diversifying the qualities that define good health. Healthy men are fit and free of harmful diseases, of course, but they’re also good husbands, boyfriends, fathers, bosses, and employees. Healthy men also manage their personal finances in healthy ways. And over the years, Men’s Health has shared essential advice from the top financial experts in the field to help you maximise your money. (Full Story)

5.15.15

U-T San Diego -- Q: Are you concerned that consumer spending is not increasing at the same healthy rate as job growth?

ALAN GIN, UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO

Answer: YES

Between 1947 and the Great Recession, consumption contributed 2.22 percent to annual GDP growth of 3.51 percent. During the recovery, consumption’s contribution fell to 1.57 percent and this slowed GDP growth to only 2.25 percent. The worsening of income inequality in this country is a big reason for the slump. (Full Story)

5.14.15

Wallet Hub -- The struggles endured in recent years by America’s young people pale in comparison to those suffered by their peers in Spain and Greece, where youth unemployment in excess of 50 percent has spawned great social unrest. Still, finding a job in the U.S. — let alone laying the foundation for a long and prosperous career — is far from simple.

But there’s reason for optimism among the graduating class of 2015 and the scores of young people so disillusioned with the job market that they’ve given up their search for employment. Not only do more employers plan to hire recent college grads in 2015, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, but hiring in general is also on the rise. (Full Story)

5.14.15

Bisnow -- Four months after taking over as executive director at the University of San Diego's Burnham-Moores Center for Real Estate, Stath Karras noticed something very important: The Millennial mind-set is very real.

“It's a demographic that is getting married later in life. They're having children later in life. They're highly technologically advanced,” Stath tells us. And to add to that descriptive mix, when it comes to workplace expectations, Millennials are much more team-oriented and collaborative. That goes for USD's students as well. (Full Story)

5.07.15

The Daily Transcript -- About $2.5 billion worth of real estate investments could be raised via crowdfunding this year, industry reports say, a great increase from last year’s paltry $1 billion.

“Extrapolate that out a few more years and it might actually be something really significant,” said Professor Norm Miller of Burnhan-Moores Center for Real Estate. “More than that, it might be significant to smaller investors.”

Three professionals in the crowdfunding arena spoke on a panel moderated by Miller on Wednesday morning as part of a Burnham-Moores Center breakfast lecture series.

The event was at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice Theatre, on the University of San Diego campus. (Full Story)

5.06.15

Fox News Latino -- “This goes up against and threatens the message that Mexico is trying to push – that it is a vibrant economic power,” David Shirk, professor of international relations at the University of San Diego and an investigator at the research group Justice in Mexico, told FNL.

Shirk added that this incursion into a high-profile urban area by a drug cartel is something that the Mexican government has dealt with before. (Full Story)

4.30.15

USA Today -- Murders in Mexico fell for a third straight year in 2014 — the most pronounced declines occurring along the U.S. border — a sign the country is slowly stabilizing after gruesome drug wars.

There were 15,649 people murdered in Mexico in 2014, a 13.8% reduction from the previous year and down from a peak of 22,480 in 2011, according to a report set to be released Thursday by the University of San Diego's Justice in Mexico Project. (Full Story)

4.30.15

KPBS -- The early 20th century was a turning point for women’s rights in America. The right to vote was secured nationwide in 1920. Many states in the West got there sooner. The territory of Wyoming allowed women to vote in 1869. California had women’s suffrage in 1911.

But University of San Diego historian Molly McClain said as much as they wanted political rights, women of the time also wanted some recognition for their place in history and the contributions they had made. (Full Story)

4.30.15

U-T San Diego -- Entitled “Drug Violence in Mexico,” the report has been produced annually since 2010 by the University of San Diego’s Justice in Mexico project, and examines trends across the country.

While Mexico’s homicide numbers in 2014 dropped anywhere from 9 to 15 percent, depending on the source, “things are improving slowly and haltingly,” said David Shirk, a USD political science professor and one of the authors of the report. “It’s certainly not time for breaking out the Champagne,” he said. (Full Story)

4.28.15

KPBS -- The labor market is driving the increase in the index, according to University of San Diego economist Alan Gin.

Jobless claims declined and help wanted advertising was up, Gin said. And there was positive movement in all the local categories.

"All six (local) components were up," Gin said. "That's the third month in a row where that's happened. That hasn't happened before in the history of the index. So it looks like the local economy is firing on all cylinders at this point." (Full Story)

4.27.15

ABC 10 News -- University of San Diego Kroc Institute has helped Nepal since Civil War. (Full Story)

4.25.15

CBS News 8 -- Richard Allyn speaks with Zahra Ismail, Program Officer with the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace & Justice (Full Story)

4.21.15

U-T San Diego -- Still, said Katie Ferraro, a registered dietitian and assistant clinical professor at the University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, consumers need to remember that eating fresh, local food does not automatically equal health.

“Organic junk food is still junk food,” she said. “Just because a food was sourced locally — or recently — does not ensure its health. If a food is laden with too many calories, excessive salt or saturated fats, regardless of its origin, it can be considered unhealthful.” (Full Story)

4.20.15

The Daily Illini -- The plot is clear “even if you don’t understand French. There’s so much going on there visually,” said Eric Pierson, associate professor at the University of San Diego and Ebertfest panelist during the movie’s Q and A session. (Full Story)

4.19.15

U-T San Diego -- The peninsula in San Diego Bay known as Ballast Point comes from Fort Guijarros, a small Spanish garrison on Point Loma that guarded the bay. Guijarros translates to “ballast,” said Iris Engstrand, a history professor at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

4.17.15

Standard-Times -- Others suggested that Google not risk a drawn-out battle.

“I would absolutely settle,” said Robert Fellmeth, executive director of the Center for Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego. “The European Union is a big market and the EU likely is going to win in the courts” if Google appeals an adverse judgment. The company has to “nip this in the bud.” (Full Story)

4.14.15

U-T San Diego -- “He’s got solid credentials as an academic intellectual,” said Mary Lyons, the University of San Diego’s president, “but also great pastoral experience and tremendous compassion for the underserved.” (Full Story)

4.13.15

KPBS -- A recent survey of Tijuana police officers shows more than 80 percent of them acknowledge some level of corruption in their department.

The University of San Diego’s Justice in Mexico project shared the survey's findings on Friday, a month after releasing the results in Mexico.

Project researchers teamed up with think tanks on both sides of the border to conduct what they say is the largest study ever done on the Tijuana Police Department. (Full Story)

4.13.15

U-T San Diego -- Numerous sources confirmed the schools have agreed to a one-year contract to play outdoors in early December at the downtown baseball stadium, in a similar configuration that hosted tennis’ Davis Cup last year and will seat up to 20,000. It will be SDSU’s second game in the elements in four years, having opened the 2012-13 season against Syracuse on the USS Midway aircraft carrier in San Diego Bay.

The Petco game is the brainchild of SDSU athletic director Jim Sterk, who figured if basketball could be played on a flight deck, why not on a warning track? (Full Story)

4.10.15

U-T San Diego -- Among the key findings: the need for clearer rules to determine promotions and allow the department’s most promising officers to move up the ranks.

“People don’t think they’re being promoted for their merit,” said David Shirk, a USD political science professor who heads the Justice in Mexico Project and is one of the study’s authors. “You’ve got to tell people what the rules are.” (Full Story)

4.03.15

Huffington Post -- Alberto Pulido, a professor of ethnic studies at the University of San Diego, spent six years studying the Penitente Brotherhood. He says intrusions from the outside world have haunted the Hermanos for decades.

"In history, they've always been portrayed as flagellants, as non-Christians, as immoral individuals," Pulido says. "It's time to recognize the fact that we need to see them in a different way." (Full Story)

3.24.15

Times of San Diego -- “The inspiration behind Insight was to be able to offer an easy tool for students to manage and prioritize their obligations, assignments and to-dos right on their smartphone as the need for the task occurs,” said Avi Badwal, senior director of enterprise technologies who led the development of the Insight App. “Real-time organization and management are what set this app apart.” (Full Story)

3.20.15

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said wages should start to increase more substantially when the unemployment rate falls below 5 percent, something he sees happening by the end of the year.

“The labor market will tighten up,” he said. “Employers will have more difficulty finding workers and so they’re going to have to offer higher wages to entice people to work there.” (Full Story)

3.19.15

Fox 11 -- About a dozen studies over the past 25 years have shown, in one way or another, that we, as sports fans, are inexorably drawn to the team with the odds stacked against it.

“It’s the prominent narrative in sports,” said Nadav Goldschmied of University of San Diego, who collaborated on one of the studies. (Full Story)

3.18.15

ABC News -- "It's the prominent narrative in sports," said Nadav Goldschmied of University of San Diego, who collaborated on one of the studies.

This penchant runs counter to almost everything else we're wired to think. Scientific studies show people want to be associated with success and that our self-esteem grows when we're part of the "in" crowd. Walk one well-dressed job candidate through the door, then follow him up with a schlub, and the studies show the majority of us favor the person who appears more attractive, almost regardless of their credentials.

But take that same dynamic into a sporting contest, where it's a scraggly No. 14 seed against a polished No. 3, and the perceptions change. (Full Story)

3.18.15

KPBS -- Carl Luna, a political science professor at Mesa College, will moderate the conference with keynote speaker Steven Dinkin, president of the National Conflict Resolution Center.

Luna said the key to civility is respect.

“As soon as respect breaks down the whole social context breaks down,” Luna told KPBS Midday Edition on Wednesday. “That’s the path we really (have) been slipping down that we need to reverse.” (Full Story)

3.17.15

U-T San Diego -- And when it comes to a beverage to wash down traditional Irish food, Katie Ferraro, a registered dietitian and assistant clinical professor of nutrition at the University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, said beer such as Guinness “is not nearly as bad for you as some people think.”

In fact, she said, at 4.2 percent, Guinness actually contains less alcohol than most beers, and its dark color doesn’t mean it’s high in calories.

“Because of its lower alcohol content, the calories in Guinness are less than you would think,” she said. “Twelve ounces has 125 calories, similar to that of many light domestic beers.” In fact, Schatzlein said, the darker the beer, the better. A dark Irish stout such as Guinness and Murphy’s contains antioxidants and flavonoids that may have heart-protective benefits. (Full Story)

3.16.15

Tech News World -- "The likely defense is that the ads were not in fact misleading to consumers -- that the ads were short but that the terms appeared in the contract [and] on the website -- though the FTC claims it wasn't up front on the website either," said Orly Lobel, a law professor at the University of San Diego.

"The judge will have to interpret what is 'deceptive and misleading' to an average consumer, and that is a ... case-by-case inquiry, depending on the norms of the industry and so forth," she told the E-Commerce Times. (Full Story)

3.16.15

U-T San Diego -- “Things aren’t as strong as we thought they were toward the end of last year,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

3.12.15

Tampa Bay Times -- "The problem I have (with Biden’s claim) is that I have no idea how anyone would figure out how many non-binding agreements there are, or indeed what even counts as a non-binding agreement," said Michael D. Ramsey, law professor at the University of San Diego. "The president and his diplomats are constantly making arrangements with foreign officials on many issues large and small, but most of these are not extensively negotiated or directed to important matters." (Full Story)

3.11.15

Tampa Bay Times -- While Congress has the power to violate international law -- and the ability of the international community to punish a violation is debatable -- "the real question, which I think both sides are missing, is whether overriding would violate international law," which requires compliance with binding agreements, said Michael D. Ramsey, a law professor at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

3.10.15

U-T San Diego -- “Fewer people losing their jobs and stronger hiring: It’s a really good combination,” said Alan Gin, a University of San Diego economist who produces a local index of leading indicators.

Gin expects the unemployment rate to fall below 5 percent sometime this year, a level that could create conditions necessary for sustainable wage gains as employers compete for scarce workers. San Diego hasn’t seen such conditions since the “golden age” of job creation from 1997 through 2000, when employers created close to 45,000 positions a year. (Full Story)

3.09.15

U-T San Diego -- When the debate heated up last year over whether to raise San Diego’s minimum wage, Alan Gin went out on a limb.

An economist at the University of San Diego’s School of Business Administration, Gin made his case for increasing the city’s base hourly rate at news conferences held by the Center on Policy Initiatives.

“It was something I just believed in,” said Gin, 58. “There might be some unhappiness with the stance I took in the business community, but there hasn’t been any sort of fallout or anything like that.” (Full Story)

3.08.15

U-T San Diego -- People are much less likely to pull the trigger when there is a high probability it will have significant negative consequences for themselves as well as their victims,” said David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego and head of the school’s Justice in Mexico project. “The low number of homicides prosecuted throughout Mexico, including Baja California and Tijuana, means that you can literally get away with murder.” (Full Story)

3.06.15

U-T San Diego -- "The rumors of California’s demise are greatly exaggerated here," said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. "The unemployment rate's coming down and the gap between California and the rest of the country is narrowing." (Full Story)

3.05.15

The Modesto Bee -- Pat Libby, director of the University of San Diego’s Institute for Nonprofit Education and Research, said she advocates that nonprofit organizations be transparent when facing a crisis. But she understands the Salvation Army’s position.

“Every time there is a scandal, it has a ripple effect on all nonprofits and jeopardizes charitable contributions and the public’s willingness to volunteer,” Libby said. “The most valuable asset a nonprofit owns is its reputation.” (Full Story)

3.05.15

Fox News Latino -- “The only thing he’s managed is to get the public attention away from the security program,” said Octavio Rodriguez, program coordinator of the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego. “He’s managed to get the executions out of the newspapers.” (Full Story)

3.02.15

U-T San Diego -- “He’s a very thoughtful, helpful, wonderful man,” said Mary Lyons, president of the University of San Diego, who once tried to recruit McElroy for the Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies. “I’m very happy, very excited.” (Full Story)

3.01.15

U-T San Diego -- A soon-to-be released study that looks at the lives of Tijuana police officers and their interactions with civilians found that more than 80 percent of the officers surveyed said “there is some level of corruption on the force,” said David Shirk, a professor at University of San Diego, and one of the study’s authors. (Full Story)

2.28.15

U-T San Diego -- “(The exhibit) shows there was a sophisticated and really active professional artist core here, working in their own manner already,” said Cartwright, a professor at the University of San Diego. “And what’s exciting for me about this is there’s at least a century, if not more, of high-quality artistic practice here that merits attention. (Full Story)

2.24.15

KPBS -- The University of San Diego's Trans-Border Institute kicks off it's 9th annual Border Film Week on Tuesday. The films range from the risks Mexican journalists take to report on the drug war to the consequences one Mexican town faced from mass migration of its residents.

Ev Meade, director at the institute, said the event gives people a new medium to explore complex issues like immigration.

"We have a mission to speak to the general public but also speak in a variety of different media," Meade told KPBS Midday Edition on Tuesday. "The films that we feature are mostly documentary films. It's creative but creative to a point — creative with a lot of facts." (Full Story)

2.22.15

Public Radio International -- While the Academy takes heat for this year's line-up, the diversity critique isn't new. According to an Associated Press survery, 86 non-whites have won Oscars since 1929, compared to 812 whites. Brian Hu, artistic director at the San Diego Asian Film Festival and adjunct faculty of media and film at the University of San Diego, says he wasn't surprised by the nominations. “I know better than to be disappointed. I’ve been jilted too long to be disappointed,” he says. (Full Story)

2.20.15

MSN News -- "The incident in Mamasapano has reignited anti-Moro sentiment while also increasing fear among the Moro community that the Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro will not be implemented,"? Jennifer Freeman, senior program officer for Women, Peace and Security of the Joan B. Froc Institute for Peace and Development based at the University of San Diego, which sponsored the dialogue, said. (Full Story)

2.16.15

The Atlanta Journal Constitution -- Under the terms of a truce with San Francisco, San Diego had to leave the word “international” out of the name of its expo.

“At first, it was a rivalry,” said Iris Engstrand, a professor of history at the University of San Diego and curator of “San Diego Invites the World: The 1915 Expo” at the San Diego History Center. “But then they both realized they were both going to have a fair, and they’d better cooperate.” (Full Story)

2.15.15

WGBH News -- “[T]here’s a lot of gamesmanship and strategy promoting buildings as LEED-certified,” said Norm Miller, a professor of real estate at the University of San Diego. Miller helped produce a 2011 study in 14 American cities that found that buildings advertising LEED certification bring an average of 7 percent higher rents than ones without the designation. (Full Story)

2.13.15

U-T San Diego -- Question: Do you deserve a raise?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: Yes

Businesses will have to start paying higher wages soon as the labor market is starting to tighten. (Full Story)

2.06.15

The New York Times -- Companies’ offshore cash holdings are a tempting target for American tax writers, as President Obama’s proposal this week to tax deferred offshore earnings proves. Those same offshore earnings may attract foreign buyers as well. (Full Story)

2.03.15

Fox 5 -- While San Diego may not be the most expensive city to own a home, it is considered the least affordable.

According to a study conducted by Realtor.com, San Diego ranks as the most unaffordable city in terms of real estate in relation to income.

“In more than 90 percent of the zip codes, less than half of the people can afford to buy homes. That’s the worst in any metropolitan area in the U.S.,” said University of San Diego economics professor Alan Gin. (Full Story)

2.02.15

Constitution Daily -- Michael Ramsey, law professor at the University of San Diego, points to Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, which features a laundry list of congressional powers and responsibilities. The authority to host a foreign leader is not included.

Article II, Section 3, on the other hand, says that the President “shall receive Ambassadors and other public Ministers.” This reception power is understood to be an exclusive power of the President, says Ramsey, by virtue both of tradition and of its specific call-out in Article II. (Full Story)

2.02.15

KPBS -- The report, "Shame On U.S.," said this lack of compliance is hurting kids and families. It was compiled by The Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law.

"We were seeing a lot of the problems in the system," Christina Riehl, the institute's senior staff attorney, told KPBS Midday Edition on Monday. "We were seeing that over and over again, and we didn't see improvements." (Full Story)

1.29.15

KUSI -- The numbers come from the University of San Diego's economist Alan Gin who compiles monthly reports on the local economy.

Alan Gin has been giving up-beat economic reports for several months now, and the positive news has pushed the local economic index to its highest level in more than seven years.

The economic index numbers remain tiny, however: up only 1.3 percent in November, .8 percent in December.

"Any change of one percent or more, in either direction during a month, is a significant change," said Gin. (Full Story)

1.29.15

U-T San Diego -- San Diego County's economy had a solid 2014, but the most impressive part came at the end of the year, says a new study released Thursday by the University of San Diego.

Led by gains in the job market and consumer confidence, the university's Index of Leading Economic Indicators for the county rose to a more than seven-year high in December. Stock prices increased, and so did job ads. At the same time, initial claims for unemployment fell. The county also got a boost from nationwide gains, as businesses here sell products and services to the rest of the country.

"The economy is just feeding on itself," said Alan Gin, economist at USD. "As more people get employed, there’s just more income in the economy, people are spending more and that just creates even more jobs." (Full Story)

1.27.15

The Daily Transcript -- “Justice Cossio’s appearance is a great opportunity for the campus and very exciting for us,” said David Shirk, director of the Justice in Mexico program.


“It will not only be a chance to hear the justice talk about the effects of judicial reform, a hot topic, but also bring together a number of key players in our efforts at USD to help promote the implementation of judicial reforms in Mexico.”


Shirk, a USD associate professor of political science and international relations, said the justice’s talk will also serve as the inaugural event in a planned series of trainings and exchanges with UNAM School of Law. (Full Story)

1.27.15

The Daytona Beach News-Journal -- “Our laws are weak. We don’t invest in solutions. Federal laws aren’t enforced. And courts are turning their backs. This creates a trifecta of inertia and neglect,” said Amy Harfeld, policy director at the Children’s Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law, which wrote the report with the nonprofit group First Star. (Full Story)

1.27.15

CBS News -- The 110-page report released Tuesday identified some of the same failures reported in December by The Associated Press after an eight-month investigation into hundreds of children who died of abuse or neglect in plain view of child protection authorities.

"Our laws are weak. We don't invest in solutions. Federal laws aren't enforced. And courts are turning their backs. This creates a trifecta of inertia and neglect," said Amy Harfeld, policy director at the Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law, which wrote the report with the nonprofit group First Star. (Full Story)

1.27.15

KPBS -- Federal officials say they're encouraged that the numbers are lower than they were in 2012. But children's advocates say that abuse is so often not reported that it's impossible to know if there's really been a decline.

"This is just something that's chronically underreported," says Elisa Weichel, a staff attorney with the Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law, which published the report Tuesday.

She says abuse and neglect cases — especially those resulting in death — are often not disclosed as required by law. That lack of information has led to other problems in the system.

"It all boils down to having the right amount of data about what's working and what's not," Weichel says. "And when your data is flawed, every other part of your system is going to be flawed." (Full Story)

1.27.15

Epoch Times -- In a statement released with the report, Elisa Weichel, Administrative Director and Staff Attorney at CAI, said, “It is no secret that child welfare law is disjointed and underfunded.” But people are not as aware the federal government is legally mandated to enforce certain standards for child protection, and the judicial branch makes it harder for people to sue to protect children. (Full Story

1.26.15

USA Today -- University of San Diego law professor Shaun Martin, an expert on 9th Circuit matters. Martin said it is unusual for the court to determine on its own that one case is related to a prior case and for the same panel of judges to assume jurisdiction over the subsequent case. Usually, Martin said, such determinations are made after a request by one of the sides. No such requests have been recorded in the 9th Circuit's list of filings in the O'Bannon case.

"With run-of-the-mill cases, no one around even remembers (what might be) a related case," Martin said. "This ain't a run-of-the-mill case."

Martin said that the NCAA's specific assertions about Bybee's Keller appeal opinion won't help its cause in the O'Bannon case, but the bigger issue is that the three judges "already have expressed their opinions in a related case." (Full Story)

1.12.15

10 News -- The San Diego economy gained momentum in a number of industries that should continue to do well in 2015, said USD economist Alan Gin. (Full Story).

 

12.10.14

NBC San Diego -- A new report finds the CIA's use of torture was far more brutal than anyone in the government knew, sparking national controversy. Here in San Diego, NBC 7's Megan Tevrizian talked with two people whose conclusions on the report could not have been more different. (Full Story)

12.09.14

U-T San Diego -- “Ultimately, the food pyramid that existed from 1992 to 2005 was scrapped, because it was not an effective teaching tool,” said Katie Ferraro, a registered dietitian and assistant clinical professor of nutrition at the University of San Diego Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science. During the pyramid’s 13-year run, Americans’ weight and waistlines expanded, while body mass index increased every year during that run.

Ferraro said criticisms of the 1992 pyramid included its lack of differentiation between refined, white grains and whole grains at the base of the pyramid; no differentiation between high-fat animal meats and lean protein choices; and no mention of portion sizes or exercise. (Full Story)

12.07.14

U-T San Diego -- For Katie Ferraro, a registered dietitian who enjoys a few tortilla chips now and then, her career has been based on the value of moderation.

“Every day, we’re all faced with numerous food choices,” she said. “We have to eat to survive. But I take issue with the guilt-laden approach to diet-food marketing these days. It’s mainly the frequency and portion size that gets you in trouble, not how many fat-free products you consume.”

An assistant clinical professor at UC San Francisco and the University of San Diego, Ferraro is also a UC San Diego Extension instructor who teaches four current courses: Cultural Foods, Introduction to Nutrition Sciences, Nutrition Therapy for Healthcare Professionals, and Nutrition Throughout the Lifecycle. (Full Story)

12.02.14

KPBS -- Tom Reifer, associate professor of sociology at USD and associate fellow at Trans-National Institute, spoke with KPBS about President Obama's stance on the events happening in Ferguson, MO, and a "militarized" police culture.  (Full Story)

12.02.14

U-T San Diego -- University of San Diego senior Connor Anderson was ranked 10th among a class of 5,617 seniors scheduled to graduate next spring by the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). (Full Story)

12.02.14

The Christian Science Monitor -- “Everybody likes simple solutions to complex problems,” says David Shirk, the director of the Justice in Mexico Project at the University of San Diego. “A lot of the things Peña Nieto proposed give lip service to fighting corruption, protecting human rights and ordinary citizens, but it doesn’t go to the heart of the problem: fighting corruption and strengthening weak institutions.” (Full Story)

12.02.14

The Moderate Voice -- After months of speculation, President Obama finally announced a sweeping executive action on immigration, which could potentially protect nearly 5 million undocumented immigrants from deportation.

In order to qualify, undocumented immigrants must have been here for more than five years, have children who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents, register, pass a criminal-background check, and pay any back taxes and associated fines they may owe.

Everard Meade, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

12.01.14

Times of San Diego -- Don Dripps, a professor at the University of San Diego School of Law, told City News Service that an investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice could bring far more change to Ferguson than the prosecution of one police officer.

Such an investigation could result in a “consent decree” that would place the police department under a federal monitor, tighten use-of-force restrictions and require reporting of interactions between officers and the public. The restrictions would be imposed if a pattern of civil rights violations was found, he said.  (Full Story)

11.30.14

ABC 10 News San Diego -- Alan Gin, a professor of economics at the University of San Diego, says local sales were up this four-day weekend. He added that 55,000 more people have jobs compared to last year, there is an increase in consumer confidence and gas prices are down.

"Gas prices are down 54 cents, that's compared to a year ago. My estimate … that means we have $54 million that's available to spend in the local economy," said Gin. (Full Story)

11.26.14

Times of San Diego -- A University of San Diego student who has already launched one watch company is raising funds on Kickstarter for a second.

Nathan Resnick’s new Azula brand watches are made with a fabric background, with each timepiece unique because of different cuts of the fabric.

“Most watch faces are printed with ink. After looking for ways to stand out, I came up with the idea to put fabric on a watch face,” Resnick said. (Full Story)

11.26.14

Chicago Tribune -- Robert C. Fellmeth, a University of San Diego law professor and former prosecutor, said McCulloch may have erred by giving "a spirited defense of the grand jury's decision." (Full Story)

11.24.14

San Jose Mercury News -- "(The governor's) recent appointments to the California Supreme Court reflects a realization in Sacramento of something made decades ago in D.C. in connection with the U.S. Supreme Court," said Shaun Martin, a University of San Diego law professor. "The younger the justices are when they get appointed, the longer they stay there and affect the law." (Full Story)

11.21.14

Voice of San Diego -- Laura Dietrick, director of the Caster Family Center for Nonprofit and Philanthropic Research at the University of San Diego, is working with local nonprofits to use both quantitative and qualitative measures to appease stakeholders and capture the fuzzier change communities and clients experience.

“To say, ‘You haven’t achieved this impact. You’ve been here for five or 10 or 15 years,’ I think is a little shortsighted,” Dietrick said. “But there needs to be proof of short-term wins along the way.”  (Full Story)

11.20.14

Rancho Santa Fe Review -- The Rancho Santa Fe Foundation commissioned the Caster Center for Nonprofit and Philanthropic Research at the University of San Diego to conduct a needs assessment study to better understand the food and transportation needs of the vulnerable senior population in North County. Mary Jo Schumann, Ph.D., associate director of the Caster Center at USD, concluded in the report that “seniors don’t eat well alone,” and that transportation is a key issue in North County. The report suggested “bringing the food to the seniors” via a food truck.  (Full Story)

11.19.14

Bloomberg Businessweek -- The litigation is “mushrooming,” Orly Lobel, a University of San Diego law professor, said in an interview. “Once there’s a visible test case, you look around to see where else it’s happening, and the next cases are easier to put together.” (Full Story)

11.18.14

Times of San Diego -- Alan Jin, a professor of economics at the University of San Diego, said President Obama’s veto power means there could still be gridlock, but predicted “a little bit of compromise” with benefits for San Diego’s military-based economy. (Full Story)

11.18.14

Voice of San Diego -- Orly Lobel, a labor and employment law professor at the University of San Diego, argues this pro-employee law has contributed to success of serial software and biotechnology entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley and San Diego alike.

“That prohibition against non-competes has actually invigorated the economy,” she said.  (Full Story)

11.18.14

KPBS -- Laura Deitrick heads the Caster Family Center for Nonprofit and Philanthropic Research at the University of San Diego. She said reversing generations of disinvestment in City Heights is going to take, well, generations.

"Everyone wants to talk about impact, and if you're not making an impact in, like, five minutes, then you must not be doing it right," Dietrick said. "But, you know, if you think back to the beginning of a big company like eBay or Amazon and you look at how long it took them to even break even, investors didn't blink an eye. We think that's normal. I think we need to be realistic about what we're trying to achieve and how long that's going to take."  (Full Story)

11.12.14

Education World -- The University of San Diego was awarded a $600,000 grant from The National Science Foundation to hire more female STEM professors. The university hired eight professors to begin teaching classes in fall 2014. (Full Story)

11.11.14

U-T San Diego -- Tuesday’s parade paid tribute to Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, the first time that the annual event has ever focused on the post-9/11 generation.

Throngs of student veterans from San Diego State, the University of San Diego and other local colleges formed the largest group representing that era. (Full Story)

11.11.14

U-T San Diego -- This year, the county sent out property tax bills expecting to collect $5.07 billion in property tax revenue. That trounces the fiscal year 2012-13 total of $3.8 billion. Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said the increased property tax revenue may not solve the shortfall, but it’ll help.

“When the recession ended, that meant that we stopped dropping, but coming back from it just took a long time,” he said. “Property tax revenue would be impacted due to declining home values, sales tax revenue would be affected because consumers weren’t spending as much, and then you have greater need.” (Full Story)

11.10.14

Voice of San Diego -- TFA’s targeted efforts help them land students like Liset Godinez, a senior at the University of San Diego who started the school’s first Latina sorority. Godinez grew up in Sherman Heights and was attracted to TFA specifically because it would allow her to give back to the neighborhoods like the one she grew up in.

After she sent in her application, she met with Lopez and asked him about the chances of being placed locally. Lopez told her he doesn’t have final say over where corps members land, but told her she did three things right: She got her application in on time, she’s from San Diego and she’s bilingual.

Next year she’ll be in a San Diego classroom near you, teaching bilingual studies. (Full Story)

11.10.14

KPBS -- Once again, the home base for the Festival is the UltraStar Theaters at Hazard Center. Closing night will be at Sherwood Auditorium at The Museum of Contemporary Art in La Jolla. The centerpiece film, "Fresh Off the Boat" on Nov. 8, will be screened at the University of San Diego Shiley Theater where this festival first began 15 years ago. (Full Story)

11.07.14

U-T San Diego -- Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego, said the wage growth reported doesn't necessarily mean the same person in the same job got a 2 percent raise.

"Some people are going to get raises, other people are going to move on to a higher paying job, and some low paying jobs will be lost," Gin said.

Gin said recent increases to the minimum wage, such as California's recently moving to $9 per hour, aren't large enough to make a sizeable impact on the national data.  (Full Story)

11.05.14

Triple Pundit -- Consumers are already seeing a difference. Walter Wang, an adviser with ZSA and Adjunct Professor at the University of San Diego School of Law, pointed out that many utility ratepayers have seen a “climate credit” on their bills this year. “There is real value in these programs going forward,” Wang said, “and while ‘energy efficiency’ isn’t sexy, there is immediate value and a short payback period.” (Full Story)

11.04.14

U-T San Diego -- To University of San Diego adjunct professor of theatre arts, Ryan Beattie Scrimger, the connection is precisely as the Bard doth quote: “All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.”

“Most of us already use the life skills that acting courses can help sharpen and define,” said Scrimger, a mainstay of San Diego’s theatre scene. “They are the basic skills of problem-solving, collaboration, persuasion, negotiation, and self-confidence.” (Full Story)

11.04.14

KYMA News 11 -- "We know that water is a scarce resource in California. The idea is that we would invest in shoring up the resources we have," University of San Diego Professor Casey Dominguez said.

The programs would include watershed restoration and protection… ground water storage and ecosystem sustainability.

"This bond initiative is not going to do anything to fix a short term water problem but in terms of managing the Delta and the water supplies out of the Delta, restoring ecosystems and watersheds to protect future water supplies," Dominguez said. (Full Story)

10.29.14

KYMA News 11 -- University of San Diego Professor Carl Luna predicts the proposition will go in favor of the medical field.

Luna says usually when there’s a lot of money backing the proposition it wins.

"There has been a massive amount of money spent by the medical community against this and in general the more money you spend the better you have a chance to win," Luna said. (Full Story)

10.28.14

Tech News World -- "The licensing decision is another devastating decision -- albeit somewhat expected -- for Aereo," said Orly Lobel, professor of law at the University of San Diego.

"The judge in the decision nodded to Aereo ... 'doing its best to turn lemons into lemonade,'" she told the E-Commerce Times. (Full Story)

10.21.14

U-T San Diego -- In September, foreclosure resales made up 3.3 percent of transactions in the county. Norm Miller, a real-estate professor at the University of San Diego, said about six months ago the university stopped using foreclosures in its models for predicting prices.

“The home prices have gone up enough now that we’re not seeing strategic defaults anymore,” he said. “There are a few pockets still with lingering inventory, and still some even here, but they’re not enough of the market to drive prices the way they were.”  (Full Story)

10.21.14

U-T San Diego -- “Those are the type of jobs that we want in this economy,” said Alan Gin, economist at the University of San Diego. “Because they’re high paying, people spend in the economy. That boosts the housing market, car dealerships, and restaurants.”  (Full Story)

10.21.14

U-T San Diego -- Zachary Green, a University of San Diego professor, said another challenge will be drawing young people into civic discourse when they are more focused on Facebook than newspapers and more traditional media.

“There’s a new generation of people who are wired differently,” he said.  (Full Story)

10.16.14

KPBS -- Kellie Sandman-Hurley has a doctorate in literacy with a specialty in dyslexia. She runs the Dyslexia Training Institute through the University of San Diego.

This is how she describes the disorder:

“Dyslexia is a phonological processing disorder. It affects the student’s ability to decode and encode. And so it affects their fluency rate, it affects their spelling. It just makes reading more difficult.”  (Full Story)

10.11.14

Los Angeles Times -- Undisclosed emails and other private conversations are representative of the "endemic corruption" in state government created by "the imbalance" in lobbying power between wealthy corporations and advocacy groups that speak for consumers and utility ratepayers, said Robert Fellmeth, a regulatory law expert and director of the Center for Public Interest Law at the University of San Diego. (Full Story)

10.11.14

U-T San Diego -- “I am not a proponent of the idea that we can conserve our way out of those policy problems,” said John Minan, a law professor at the University of San Diego and a former chairman of the California Regional Water Quality Control Board. “Clearly, additional conservation is necessary. But you reach a point where conservation simply doesn’t produce additional water resources. So the struggle and challenge will be to find additional water resources.” (Full Story)

10.11.14

U-T San Diego -- This is why RISE, in collaboration with the University of San Diego’s Leadership Institute, is creating a program to nurture rising leaders to engage in community change work. (Full Story)

10.10.14

Mission Valley News -- Where Trans-Border Institute Director Everard Meade sees the need for the U.S. to fix dysfunctional immigration courts, University of San Diego Professor David Shirk said the U.S. should invest more in the immigrants’ home countries so people wouldn’t have to leave — and spend less on fortifying our borders to stop them after they’ve started the journey. (Full Story)

10.10.14

U-T San Diego -- Question: Will continued security breaches at banks, retailers and other businesses start to harm the economy anytime soon?

Alan Gin, University of San Diego

Answer: No

But there may be some long-term concerns. (Full Story)

10.09.14

“The outlook is for continued solid growth in San Diego’s economy at least through the first half of 2015,” said USD professor Alan Gin. “The local economy has done well so far this year, with the county on a pace to add 31,000 jobs.”  (Full Story)

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