Joan E. Bowes-James Madison Distinguished Speaker Series

Date and Time:

Friday, October 28, 2011 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Location:

Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace & Justice Theatre

Details:

"Liberalism, Conservatism and the Tea Party: The Meaning of the 2012 Election"

The 2008 election looked like the end of a 28-year conservative era, and the dawn of a liberal one. The results of the 2010 election put this judgment in doubt. Liberalism seems less ascendant than liberals expected it to be, conservatism less dead than conservatives feared. This is partly thanks to the Tea Party—which raises its own questions about the future of conservative thought. So one can say that, as the 2012 election approaches, New Deal/Great Society liberalism is in trouble, and Reagan–Bush conservatism seems not up to the task as well. What are the alternative paths conservatism and liberalism might take? What about the populist and "constitutionalist" sentiments captured by the Tea Party? Could 2012 be an inflection point for American politics, like 1932 and 1980? And in what direction might we inflect? These and other questions—including issues of the role of the courts and the meaning of appeals to the Constitution—will be considered.

Schedule

About the Speaker

William Kristol PortraitWilliam Kristol is editor of the influential Washington-based political magazine, The Weekly Standard. Widely recognized as one of the nation's leading political analysts and commentators, Kristol regularly appears on FOX News Sunday and FOX News Channel.

As an advocate for a strong American foreign policy, he pushed forward the foreign policy debate after September 11th and continues to be a prominent advocate for a strong U.S. foreign policy. He was a columnist for TIME magazine and The New York Times and now writes an occasional column for The Washington Post.

Before starting The Weekly Standard in 1995, Kristol led the Project for the Republican Future, where he helped shape the strategy that produced the 1994 Republican Congressional victory. Prior to that, Kristol served as chief of staff to vice president Dan Quayle during the first Bush administration and to Secretary of Education William Bennett under President Reagan. Before coming to Washington in 1985, Kristol taught politics at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.

Kristol is the co-author of The New York Times bestseller—The War Over Iraq: America's Mission and Saddam's Tyranny (2003). He also edited the well-received anthology The Weekly Standard, A Reader: 1995-2005 (2006) among other books.

Kristol is a recipient of the 2009 Bradley Prize, given in recognition of outstanding achievements that are consistent with the Bradley Foundation's mission devoted to strengthening American democratic capitalism and the institutions, principles and values that sustain and nurture it.

Reservations

Admission is free of charge, but reservations are required. Please RSVP online, via email, or call (619) 260-6848 by Friday, October 21, 2011.

MCLE Credit

The University of San Diego School of Law is a State Board of California-approved MCLE provider and certifies that this activity is approved for MCLE credit in the amount of 1 hour of general credit.

Directions to the University of San Diego

About the Joan E. Bowes-James Madison Distinguished Speaker Series

Established by longtime La Jolla resident and civic activist Joan E. Bowes, the speaker series was created to promote the open exchange of ideas and to inspire law students and other members of the San Diego community. Bearing the name of James Madison—fourth president of the United States and "Father of the Constitution"—this annual series brings distinguished speakers from the fields of law, diplomacy, government and politics to the University of San Diego.

Contact:

Kay Manansala
kaym@sandiego.edu
(619) 260-4527