The Economist Highlights USD Law Professor Orly Lobel's New Book in Article About Talent Wars

San Diego (December 19, 2013) – University of San Diego (USD) School of Law Professor Orly Lobel's new book, Talent Wants To Be Free, aids the discussion about corporate talent in the December 14 issue of The Economist. The article titled, "Ties that bind," introduces the darker side of the talent wars, one that includes weapons such as lawsuits, handcuffs and litigation.  

In the article, The Economist presents the case of a clogged labor market, the results of increased litigation, and “non-compete” agreements that aim to prevent employees from leaving to work for a rival or setting up a competing business. These agreements were once mainly confined to the upper ranks of some firms but are now a common tool. The Economist reports that about 90 percent of managerial and technical employees in America have signed them.

Lobel's book, Talent Wants to Be Free, presents a counter argument. She argues that the free flow of talent encourages economic efficiency because it allows people to work in jobs and for wages that fit their skills. The free flow of talent also encourages innovation because it spreads information, extends professional networks, and encourages cross-fertilization.

About Professor Lobel

An internationally acclaimed expert in the law and economics of human capital, Orly Lobel is the Don Weckstein Professor of Law at the University of San Diego and founding faculty member of the Center for Intellectual Property and Markets. She teaches and writes in the areas of employment law, intellectual property law, regulatory and administrative law, torts, behavioral economics, health policy, consumer law and trade secrets. Her current research focuses on innovation policy and intellectual property. Lobel’s latest book is Talent Wants to Be Free: Why We Should Learn to Love Leaks, Raids, and Free-Riding.

About the University of San Diego School of Law

Recognized for the excellence of its faculty, curriculum and clinical programs, the University of San Diego (USD) School of Law enrolls approximately 900 Juris Doctor and graduate law students from throughout the United States and around the world. The law school is best known for its offerings in the areas of business and corporate law, constitutional law, intellectual property, international and comparative law, public interest law, and taxation.

USD School of Law is one of the 81 law schools elected to the Order of the Coif, a national honor society for law school graduates. The law school’s faculty is a strong group of outstanding scholars and teachers with national and international reputations and currently ranks 23rd worldwide in all-time faculty downloads on the Social Sciences Research Network (SSRN). The school is accredited by the American Bar Association and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools. Founded in 1954, the law school is part of the University of San Diego, a private, nonprofit, independent, Roman Catholic university chartered in 1949.

Contact:

Raymond Penney
rpenney@sandiego.edu
(619) 260-4031

Contact:

Pardee Legal Research Center
Pardee Legal Research Center
Main: (619) 260-4542
Reference: (619) 260-4612
Fax: (619) 260-4616

Hours

Please refer to Current Hours of Operation under General Information for a comprehensive schedule of Library and Reference Desk hours.

Professor of Law Orly Lobel

Professor of Law Orly Lobel