Course Descriptions

Spring 2017 Class Descriptions

Advanced Legal Writing (Janice L. Sperow)
LWGC505

1 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Writing OR Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG), Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)

Advanced Legal Writing is a one-unit course specifically designed to help students strengthen their fundamental legal writing skills. The class will help students master the skills needed to be a good legal writer, including :Selecting active and powerful word choices; Constructing paragraphs; Using proper grammar and punctuation; Creating a strong micro and macro legal structure; Developing thesis and conclusion sentences; Issue spotting; Extracting, formulating, and synthesizing rules of law; Crafting explicit factual comparisons; and Revising, editing and perfecting their work product. The class will also include workshops on “The Secrets of Successful Legal Writing Students” and “How to Ace Your Final & Bar Exam Essays.” Students will learn through lecture, in-class exercises, outside-class exercises, workshops, one-on-one TA and Professor sessions and practice. The class requires no outside research. It will be graded Honors, Pass, Low Pass and Fail. Students may only enroll in two of the following during their law school career: Advanced Legal Writing OR LWR III: Lit & Judicial Drafting OR LWR III: Legal Writing OR Legal Drafting. Students desiring to add the second class in this series must receive a signature on their add/drop form from the Office for Law Student Affairs, and provide the form to the Registrar office (that is, students cannot add the second class themselves online.)

Note: This course may fulfill either the Professional Skills OR Upper Division Writing requirement. Students will be asked in class at the beginning of the semester to elect which requirement they would like this course to fulfill. The student's election is final.

Advanced Pass-Thru Taxation (Willard B. Taylor)
LWTE556

2 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Taxation (MSLS), LLM in Taxation (LLMT), Taxation (LLMC)
Recommended Class(es): Corporate Tax

The use of tax pass-through entities has become widespread and powerful both in the U.S. and internationally. The purpose of the course is to understand the rules that apply to S corporations, partnerships, REITs and other pass-through entities and how those entities are used, both domestically and internationally. The course will also consider the tax policy issues that pass-through entities raise. The questions are both broad (e.g., Why do we have so many pass-through entities? Why do the rules for each differ? What are the issues for different classes of investors? Is simplification possible?) and narrow (e.g., How is entity-level tax eliminated in the case of a REIT or a RIC? In the case of a REMIC? In the case of an S corporation?) This class meets from January 9, 2017 to February 8, 2017. In addition to class participation, there will be 2 hour open book exam on February 17, 2017.

 

Advanced Trial Advocacy (Bibianne U. Fell)
LWLP515

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG), Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Trial Advocacy, Evidence

A course combining one hour per week of demonstrations and lecture with a two hour per week workshop involving critique of individual student performances in a number of the more difficult areas of trial practice. Students are videotaped during certain skills over the semester with feedback from instructors and practitioners. In addition to the weekly skills sessions, students perform at least one bench trial and one jury trial. The class will also address and consider the use of trial presentation technology at trial, and the intricacies of examining experts and children. There will be minor written requirements related to the skill of the week. This is an intensive course designed to focus on individual presentation skills. Prerequisites: Trial Advocacy and Evidence. Enrollment is limited. Students are graded by the standard letter grading system.

Agency Externship I (John Sansone)
LWVL596

1-4 credit(s), P/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI), Criminal Law (LLMG), International Law (LLMC), Criminal Law (LLMC), Health Law (JD), Employment and Labor Law (JD), Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)

The Agency Externship Program provides students the opportunity to gain valuable clinical legal experience for academic credit with a government agency or non-profit organization during the fall, spring or summer semesters. (The externship program does not allow students to receive academic credit for working in a private law firm). Students may enroll in the Agency Externship Course for
1 - 4 units of credit and must complete a minimum of 50 hours per credit (100 hours for 2 credits and 150 hours for 3 credits).

Academic requirements include: mandatory orientation, journals between student and professor relating to the field placement; periodic discussion boards on legal practice topics; a three-five page reflective paper at the end of the semester; an example of work product for professor review; and, satisfactory completion of work experience. The externship is graded on a Pass-Fail basis.

If you have been offered and have accepted a field placement, meet the eligibility requirements, agree to meet the course obligations and want to register for the Externship course, fill out the Field Placement Form. The Office of Career and Professional Development will then confirm your placement and instruct you on registering for the course.

Contact lawcareers@sandiego.edu with placement questions. Contact Professor John Sansone, Academic Director, at jsansone@sandiego.edu with academic questions.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the concentration web pages for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your Agency Internship qualifies for a concentration.
Additional Information:Concentrations Web Page, Email Law Student Affairs

Agency Externship II (John Sansone)
LWVL590

1-4 credit(s), P/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT), Intellectual Property (JD), Employment and Labor Law (JD), Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)

Externship II students refine their skills, with a longer opportunity to specialize their training in a specific area. Externship II is limited to students who have previously worked at an Agency Externship placement. Please refer to Agency Externship I description for additional requirements.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the JD concentration web pages for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your Agency Externship qualifies for a concentration.

Alternative Dispute Resolution (Alan Schulman)
LWLP517

2 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): Employment and Labor Law (LLMG), Employment and Labor Law (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)

This course will offer students an experiential approach to learning the skills required by lawyers representing clients in two primary alternatives to trial for resolving disputes between parties: mediation and arbitration. The teaching method combines classroom roleplay simulations complemented by text readings (law and theory), video demonstrations and practice skills The first part of the course will focus on mediation advocacy. Students will engage in weekly role-play exercises and have the opportunity to negotiate, mediate, represent clients, be clients, and act as a mediator. The second part of the course will focus on U.S. arbitration law, utilizing practical exercises in client counseling, drafting and negotiating an arbitration agreement, and preparing papers and arguing motion to compel employment arbitration.

Antitrust (David McGowan)
LWBC503

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (MSLS), Business and Corporate Law (MSLS), Intellectual Property Law (LLMG), Intellectual Property (LLMC), Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB), Public Interest Law (JD), Intellectual Property (JD), Business and Corporate Law (JD)

Antitrust law governs the way companies compete with each other. It aims to promote competition by prohibiting anticompetitive conduct. Antitrust is a foundational course for students interested in business law. This course studies the primary federal laws, the Sherman Act and Clayton Act, and teaches principles relevant to state antitrust law as well. The course covers economic concepts but is not a class in economics as such. A midterm and final exam will be given.

Note: There are limitations on Intellectual Property (JD) concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information:Intellectual Property Concentration (JD)

Appellate Clinic (Michael Devitt, Candace M. Carroll, David Schlesinger)
LWVL501

2 credit(s), P/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure, Evidence or concurrent enrollment, Professional Responsibility or concurrently, Crim Pro I or concurrent enrollment

The Appellate Clinic is a year-long clinic opportunity in which teams of students will enjoy the hands-on experience of litigating from start to finish an appeal before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. During the fall semester, students will write an opening brief; and in the spring semester students will write a reply brief and participate in oral argument. Additional periodic classroom sessions held throughout the academic year will focus upon appellate procedure and persuasive written and oral advocacy. From time to time, class sessions will feature guest speakers such as judges and local practicing attorneys. Students will receive four credits (two in the fall semester and two in the spring semester) for successfully completing the year long Appellate Clinic. The Appellate Clinic is open only to third and fourth year law students; and students must have completed or take concurrently with the Appellate Clinic the following courses: Civil Procedure, Evidence, Professional Responsibility, and Criminal Procedure.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Civil Litigation Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information:Civil Litigation Concentration

Art Law (Herbert I. Lazerow)
LWIP505

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (MSLS), Intellectual Property Law (LLMG), International Law (JD), Intellectual Property (JD)

Some legal problems of the art world encountered by artists, art middlemen, and museums. Some of the following topics will be considered: art in wartime, the international art trade, the artist's rights in works, artistic freedom, the collector's security, the tax collector, and the museum as trustee and entrepreneur. This course draws from doctrines in many fields, including contracts, property, torts, constitutional law, administrative law, tax, intellectual property, and international law.


Note: There are limitations on Intellectual Property (JD) concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information:Intellectual Property Concentration (JD)

View by Semester

Click on a semester below, then narrow your search by choosing a sub-item.