Course Descriptions

Spring 2017 Class Descriptions

Tax I (Herbert I. Lazerow, Miranda Perry Fleischer)
LWAA590

3-4 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Taxation (MSLS), Taxation (LLMC)

Tax I provides students with an understanding of the basic principles of federal income tax, including gross income, deductions, tax accounting, capital transactions, and income shifting. Required for upper-class students.

Tax Litigation (Richard Carpenter)
LWTE565

2 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Taxation (MSLS), LLM in Taxation (LLMT), Taxation (LLMC)

This course provides a comprehensive review of prelitigation IRS administrative procedures, practical analysis in the selection of a choice of forum to litigate a federal tax dispute, pre-trial practice and case analysis, trial techniques and strategies when litigating a federal tax dispute before the U.S. Tax Court, and a review of refund litigation. 

Tax'n of Int'l Investments (John I. Forry)
LWTE582

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Taxation (LLMC), International Law (LLMC), International Law (JD), Taxation (MSLS), International Law (MSLS), LLM in International Law (LLMI), LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

• This course focuses on tax rules for international investors in the US and selected foreign countries by way of examples.


• Topics include general tax regimes for international investors, as well as tax and related structuring rules and planning for specific cross-border activities such as: real estate and infrastructure investments; licensing and importing; establishing and financing a new local business enterprise; acquiring a local corporation; using a local business as a base for further international operations; portfolio investments in local stocks and other securities; immigration and tax planning for foreign individuals; activities by foreign governments and government-owned businesses; and reporting requirements for international investors.


• Early in the course, students are assigned to teams. Each team is provided with a brief case study proposing certain of the cross-border activities covered in the course. In the final sessions of the course, each team makes a presentation covering the key tax and related issues of its case study.

Trademark Litigation (Lisa P. Ramsey)
LWIP577

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Requirement(s): Skills OR Writing
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (MSLS), Intellectual Property Law (LLMG), Intellectual Property (LLMC), Intellectual Property (JD)

This advanced trademark class will provide students with the legal and practical skills necessary to become successful trademark litigators. Students will learn how to litigate a trademark case, including how to develop a case strategy, write a demand letter, and draft pleadings, written discovery, and motions frequently used in trademark litigation. Students will also strengthen their oral advocacy communication skills through class participation and in-class exercises simulating oral arguments before a judge or meetings with partners and clients. They will perform tasks and legal research and analysis similar to junior attorneys involved in actual trademark litigation. The grade will be based on the writing assignments and in-class oral exercises. Prerequisite: Intellectual Property Survey, Trademark Law, or Trademarks Seminar.

Transitional Justice (Dustin N. Sharp)
LWIC590

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): International Law (MSLS), LLM in International Law (LLMI), International Law (LLMC), Public Interest Law (JD), International Law (JD), Criminal Litigation (JD)

“Transitional Justice” is an emerging field of policy, practice, and study that focuses on the moral, legal, and political dilemmas encountered as individuals, communities, and nations attempt to grapple with historical legacies of war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, and other large-scale human rights violations. In such circumstances: Who must be punished and who may be pardoned? Do vigorous efforts to promote legal accountability jeopardize the emerging and fragile peace? What is the proper role and responsibility of the so-called international community? In this class, we will examine the complementarity and conflict between the often overlapping demands that nations face in the wake of large-scale human rights abuses, including retribution, reconciliation, restitution, memory, and other forms of accountability. This will include study of the traditional range of transitional justice tools and interventions that have evolved, including international tribunals from Nuremburg to the ICC, truth commissions, reparations programs, public memorials, vetting and lustration initiatives, and broader institutional reform. Along the way, we will probe the blind spots, assumptions, and limitations of varying transitional justice mechanisms, together with the transitional justice project in general. Course grades will be determined on the basis of class participation, short reaction papers, a group oral presentation, and a final research paper. Please be advised that this course does not fulfill the law school’s written work requirement.

 

Trial Advocacy (Linda L. Lane)
LWLP550

3 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG), Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)

This is an upper class course focused on the skills of case analysis and oral presentation of those cases to judges and juries on civil or criminal trials. The course also includes developing skills used in the discovery phase of civil cases, especially depositions. The course is specifically designed to expand the skills introduced to the student in Legal Research & Writing. The course methodology combines lectures, demonstrations and individual student performances in small groups with extensive critique and feedback by small group instructors who are experienced practitioners. The course culminates in a mock trial. The course is graded on a 4-tier Pass/Fail basis. 

Note: Students may only elect this course or Practicum--Civil to count toward the Civil Litigation Concentration (JD).
Additional Information:Civil Litigation Concentration

Trusts & Estates (Dennis Lilly)
LWTE555

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded

This survey course provides an introduction to non-tax aspects of estate planning and the law of gratuitous transfers, including inter vivos gifts, intestate succession, wills, will substitutes, trusts, fiduciary administration, and future interests.

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