Course Descriptions

Spring 2017 Class Descriptions

Education & Disability Clinic I (Margaret Adams)
LWVL550

2-4 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), Health Law (JD), Children's Rights (JD)
Recommended Class(es): Special Education and the Law

Students receive practical training and experience in client intake, interviewing and counseling, file review and analysis, and legal representation in diverse forums. Some cases proceed to mediation and due process hearings, where students argue the case with support from the supervising attorney. Weekly group meetings are combined with individual case conferences to provide intensive personal training in case management. The classroom component also includes an overview of statutes and cases in this growing area of civil law. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites. 

 

Note: This clinic may be applied towards the three required clinic credits for the Children's Rights Concentration (JD). There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Health Law Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information:Children's Rights Concentration, Health Law Concentration

Employment Discrimination (Miranda Oshige McGowan)
LWPP535

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Employment and Labor Law (LLMG), Employment and Labor Law (JD)

This general survey course of employment discrimination laws will focus on primarily the federal anti-discrimination laws prohibiting employment discrimination based on race, sex, pregnancy, national origin, age, sexual orientation. (We will also discuss the California Fair Employment and Housing Act's protections when they diverge from federal law. The Americans with Disabilities Act will not be a primary area of study.) This course gives students an opportunity to think about the meaning and practice of discrimination, to analyze various anti-discrimination approaches, and to learn to think creatively and flexibly when working on problems within this complex, evolving field of law. Students will learn to strategize about bringing and defending employment discrimination suits and, perhaps even more importantly, about helping clients develop policies and practices that foster discrimination-free workplaces and resolve workplace issues before they develop into lawsuits.

Employment Law & Technology (Richard A. Paul, Orly Lobel)
LWPP539

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Requirement(s): Writing
Concentration(s): Employment and Labor Law (LLMG), Employment and Labor Law (JD)

This course will examine the application of free expression, privacy, harassment, defamation and related workplace doctrines to issues created by the proliferation of communications and related technology devices. The course will open with a discussion of some of the technologies, their typical ownership and function, and of the areas of potential concern surveyed in several articles published by the instructor on these topics. The first third of the course will review employer and employee rights and duties in the clash between employer interests in efficiency and information security with employee rights of speech, privacy and the like. The second third of the course will examine the application of these ideas to different stages of the employment relationship (i.e., pre-hire, testing, selection, monitoring, discipline, etc.). We will consider current issues raised by specific electronic technologies (e.g., computer search technologies, PDAs, SNS, text and image messaging, blogspeak, GPS); medical technologies (e.g., security implants, employee genetic testing and coding); workplace configurations (e.g., remote employment); rights of ownership; and special work environments in which information free flow is either vital or restricted (e.g., public sector, healthcare, defense, higher education). The final part of the course will be reserved for presentation and discussion of student papers on topics within the general course parameters.

Note: This course may be applied as part of the nine required credits for the Employment and Labor Law Concentration (JD).
Additional Information:Employment and Labor Law Concentration

Energy Law and Policy Clinic I & II (Joseph Kaatz)
LWVL518

3 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMC), Public Interest Law (JD), Environmental and Energy Law (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Energy Law

The Energy Law and Policy Clinic provides students an opportunity to conduct legal and policy research in cooperation with a related agency, such as the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) and the California Air Resources board. Agency staff, EPIC staff, and students work together to select one or more energy-or-climate change-related legal or policy research topics. Under the supervision of a practicing attorney and EPIC staff, students conduct a semester-long research project on the selected topic(s). Students will present results to the agency staff at the end of the semester. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. 

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Environmental & Energy Law Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information:Environmental & Energy Law Concentration

Entrepreneurship Clinic I (Michael J. Hostetler, Sebastian E. Lucier)
LWVL520

2-4 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills

Through hands-on opportunities, students in the Entrepreneurship Clinic provide pro bono legal services to low- and moderate-income entrepreneurs who want to start or expand their small businesses. The Entrepreneurship Clinic does not engage in litigation-related services; instead, it focuses on advising clients on legal matters relating to starting their business and assisting in drafting and filing necessary documents. Such work includes: determining the appropriate choice of business entity, assistance in obtaining necessary permits and licenses, advising on employment and independent contractor issues, drafting and reviewing commercial contracts and leases, and assisting with the establishment of tax-exempt organizations. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

 

Entrepreneurship Clinic II (Michael J. Hostetler, Sebastian E. Lucier)
LWVL521

1-4 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills

Clinic II interns refine their skills, working on complex cases and cases already begun as Clinic I interns. Students may mentor first time clinic participants, serve as lead attorney on cases, and have additional opportunities to appear in court or administrative proceedings. Supervising attorneys/adjunct professors provide individualized coaching, based on the Clinic II interns’ needs and interests. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Clinic I in the same clinic.

Environmental Law (Tim Duane)
LWEV520

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMC), Environmental and Energy Law (JD), Environmental and Energy Law (MSLS)

This survey course addresses the principles that govern environmental law, including the respective roles of the courts, state and federal agencies, and citizen groups. Federal environmental statues covered include: The National Environmental Policy Act, Endangered Species Act, Clear Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (Superfund). The course will also introduce California state environmental law through the California Environmental Quality Act and the Public Trust Doctrine.

Note: This is a required course for the Environmental & Energy Law (JD) concentration.
Additional Information:Environmental & Energy Law Concentration (JD)

Ethics, Law & Int'l Affairs (Horacio Spector)
LWJT515

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Requirement(s): Writing
Concentration(s): International Law (MSLS), LLM in International Law (LLMI), International Law (LLMC), International Law (JD)

Contemporary public policy and legal debates in both the domestic and international arenas involve an intricate network of moral, political, and legal considerations. The course’s goal is to throw light on the relations among these three fundamental realms: ethics, politics, and law. After a general introduction, we will proceed to discuss the following topics: conceptions of liberty and equality, democracy and public deliberation, human rights, conflicts of rights, corporate responsibility for human rights violations, and the rule of law. Our attention will be focused on cross-boundary issues: Is democracy more important than the rule of law? Does economic equality threaten liberty? Are welfare and social rights compatible with civil liberties in populist democracies? In the last part of the seminar, we will deal with complex global issues: wars and military interventions, terrorism, and global justice. Can military force be used to protect human rights? Should rich nations transfer money to poor countries? Should pharmaceutical patents be enforced in the undeveloped world? Are there immigration rights? Is there a global community? Each student will be required to write a research paper of 20 pages in length. Successful completion of this course satisfies the written-work requirement.

Evidence (Donald A. Dripps, Jean Ramirez)
LWLP529

4 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (MSLS), Criminal Law (LLMG), Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)

The rules of evidence in judicial tribunals, focusing on the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Evidence Code are addressed in this course. Also covered are issues relating to: (1) judicial control and administration - functions of judge and jury, judicial notice, burden of proof presumptions, problems of relevancy, circumstantial evidence, and unfair prejudice; and (2) witnesses - competency, privileges, principles of examination and cross-examination, impeachment and support, expert and lay opinion testimony. The hearsay rule and its exceptions, rules relating to writings, real and scientific evidence are also examined. 

 

Note: This is a required course for the Civil Litigation (JD) and Criminal Litigation (JD) concentrations.

Evidence Advocacy Lab (Lisa Rodriguez)
LWLP530

1 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (MSLS), Criminal Law (LLMG), Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Evidence

This course is designed to familiarize students with the practical application of evidentiary points addressed in the traditional evidence course. Students focus on one or two evidentiary issues each week using a problem format. Each area of evidence is taught through performance. Each student is assigned as a proponent, opponent, witness and judge and is responsible for performing that role in class each week, and for submitting a short memo identifying the evidentiary issue and presenting the best approach to offering or opposing the evidence in court. The roles rotate each week. There is a new problem assigned each week. By the end of the semester, each student should be comfortably able to determine what it is he or she wished to accomplish in a courtroom with respect to specific evidentiary questions, and be able to structure the most logical, persuasive and trouble-free means to that end. The course is graded on a 4-tier Pass/Fail basis.

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