Course Descriptions

Fall 2017 Class Descriptions

E-Discovery Law (Ruth Hauswirth)
LWGC521

1 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Experiential
Recommended Class(es): Civil Procedure

This course examines Electronic discovery or “e-discovery” -- the growing body of law and practice on the treatment of electronically stored information (ESI) in litigation. ESI sources make up most of the universe of potential evidence in today’s technological world, including email, databases, information technology systems, metadata, personal and group network shares, instant messaging, text messaging, smartphones and mobile devices, social networking sites, and many other electronic data sources. The course will focus on the rapidly growing body of case law and the amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, with some discussion of California state court procedural rules. The course will discuss best practices to properly identify, preserve, collect, review, produce and use of ESI in litigation, whether in federal or state court, criminal or civil contexts, and alternative dispute resolution forums. The course will also touch on basic technical knowledge that litigation attorneys should possess to litigate cases and will expose law students to actual litigation discovery and review tools that lawyers use in practice today. The course will have an experiential component with in-class exercises including an information custodian interview, a meet and confer session, a case management conference and a motion to compel focused on e-discovery issues. Students will also draft discovery requests and objections, and prepare memos and documentation to implement reasonable preservation hold procedures as they relate to ESI needed in litigation. Students who complete the course will have an understanding of the unique legal issues and developments related to electronic discovery, and important terminology, processes and technologies that are applied to managing ESI in litigation. Students will be graded by a take home final examination.

Education & Disability Clinic I (Margaret Adams)
LWVL550

2-4 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Experiential
Concentration(s): Children's Rights (JD)

Students receive practical training and experience in client intake, interviewing and counseling, file review and analysis, and legal representation in diverse forums. Some cases proceed to mediation and due process hearings, where students argue the case with support from the supervising attorney. Weekly group meetings are combined with individual case conferences to provide intensive personal training in case management. The classroom component also includes an overview of statutes and cases in this growing area of civil law. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

 

Note: This clinic may be applied towards the three required clinic credits for the Children's Rights Concentration (JD).
Additional Information:Children's Rights Concentration

Education & Disability Clinic II (Margaret Adams)
LWVL551

1-4 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Experiential
Concentration(s): Health Law (JD), Children's Rights (JD)

Clinic II interns refine their skills, working on complex cases and cases already begun as Clinic I interns. Students may mentor first time clinic participants, serve as lead attorney on cases, and have additional opportunities to appear in court or administrative proceedings. Supervising attorneys/adjunct professors provide individualized coaching, based on the Clinic II interns’ needs and interests. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Clinic I in the same clinic. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. 

Note: This clinic may be applied towards the three required clinic credits for the Children's Rights Concentration (JD). There are limitations on concentration eligibility. Please check the Health Law Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information:Children's Rights Concentration, Health Law Concentration

Employment Law (Orly Lobel)
LWPP537

4 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Employment and Labor Law (LLMG), Public Interest Law (JD), Employment and Labor Law (JD)

This course offers students an overview of the important legal issues that are raised in the context of the employment relationship. We will discuss employment as a contractual agreement, including tort and statutory protections, such as wrongful discharge, wage and hour laws (FLSA), leave (e.g., FMLA), safety (OSHA and workers comp), unemployment insurance, discrimination (Title VII; ADA; ADEA), privacy and freedom of speech, and intellectual property issues such as R&D ownership, trade secrets and non-competition clauses. Throughout the course, student will be able to deepen their study of contract law, torts, and statutory and regulatory processes through the context of the law of the workplace.

Note: This is a required course for the Employment and Labor Law Concentration (JD).

Energy Law & Policy (Carrie A. Downey, Mike Tierney)
LWPP540

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Environmental and Energy Law (MSLS), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMC), Environmental and Energy Law (JD)

Recognizing the importance of energy to the global economy and its role in global warming, Energy Law and Policy introduces students to the legal, regulatory, and economic concepts relevant to the changing electricity and natural gas industries in the U.S. The course will examine the history of and legal basis for regulation in the energy sector, including influential cases (e.g., Munn v. Illinois) and the federal statutory framework for energy sector regulation (e.g., PUHCA of 1935, PURPA of 1978, EPACT of 1992, EPACT of 2005). Students will review the administrative law process, focusing on the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), including the rate setting process for energy utilities and major regulatory orders and decisions that have shaped the industry. The course will trace the history of regulation in the electric and natural gas industries from early regulation to deregulation and discuss the current status of energy markets, including a detailed discussion of California’s energy crisis of 2000-2001. The course will examine the connection between energy and climate change and the range of market-based solutions currently being considered at the state, regional, and federal levels in the U.S. Students will also examine the role of distributed energy resources, including smart grid technologies, on-site solar energy technology, energy efficiency and demand response, in meeting future energy needs. Participants will be required to make an in-class presentation on a topical energy issue and to take a final examination.

Note: Either this course or Climate Change Law & Policy must be taken as a required course for the Environmental & Energy Law Concentration (JD).

Entrepreneurship Clinic I (Liz Bui, Sebastian E. Lucier)
LWVL520

2-4 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Experiential

Through hands-on opportunities, students in the Entrepreneurship Clinic provide pro bono legal services to low- and moderate-income entrepreneurs who want to start or expand their small businesses. The Entrepreneurship Clinic does not engage in litigation-related services; instead, it focuses on advising clients on legal matters relating to starting their business and assisting in drafting and filing necessary documents. Such work includes: determining the appropriate choice of business entity, assistance in obtaining necessary permits and licenses, advising on employment and independent contractor issues, drafting and reviewing commercial contracts and leases, and assisting with the establishment of tax-exempt organizations. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

 

Entrepreneurship Clinic II (Liz Bui, Sebastian E. Lucier)
LWVL521

1-4 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Experiential

Clinic II interns refine their skills, working on complex cases and cases already begun as Clinic I interns. Students may mentor first time clinic participants, serve as lead attorney on cases, and have additional opportunities to appear in court or administrative proceedings. Supervising attorneys/adjunct professors provide individualized coaching, based on the Clinic II interns’ needs and interests. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Clinic I in the same clinic. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Environmental Law (Tim Duane)
LWEV520

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Environmental and Energy Law (MSLS), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMC), Environmental and Energy Law (JD)

This survey course addresses the principles that govern environmental law, including the respective roles of the courts, state and federal agencies, and citizen groups. Federal environmental statues covered include: The National Environmental Policy Act, Endangered Species Act, Clear Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (Superfund). The course will also introduce California state environmental law through the California Environmental Quality Act and the Public Trust Doctrine.

Note: This is a required course for the Environmental & Energy Law (JD) concentration.
Additional Information:Environmental & Energy Law Concentration (JD)

Evidence (Michael Devitt, Kevin Cole)
LWLP529

4 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (MSLS), Criminal Law (LLMG), Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)

The rules of evidence in judicial tribunals, focusing on the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Evidence Code are addressed in this course. Also covered are issues relating to: (1) judicial control and administration - functions of judge and jury, judicial notice, burden of proof presumptions, problems of relevancy, circumstantial evidence, and unfair prejudice; and (2) witnesses - competency, privileges, principles of examination and cross-examination, impeachment and support, expert and lay opinion testimony. The hearsay rule and its exceptions, rules relating to writings, real and scientific evidence are also examined.

Note: This is a required course for the Civil Litigation (JD) and Criminal Litigation (JD) concentrations.

Executive Branch Regulatory Policy & Law (Orde Kittrie)
LWPP512

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded

This course examines selected advanced administrative law and regulatory policy issues relating to executive agencies. Through readings and case studies, students will gain an advanced understanding of how government agencies do what they do, and of the rules and institutions that control them. The focus of the course will be on U.S. federal government agencies, with some comparisons drawn to state institutions. Guest speakers from the public and private sector will be invited to meet with the class to describe their experiences.

Case studies, some from the textbook, others from newsworthy events, will help students focus on the role of the lawyer in government agency decision-making and relations with other stakeholders. A final paper (of approximately 20 pages in length) will be required. The final grade will consist of the following components: 1) final paper - 75%, 2) class participation – 25%.  This class starts Tuesday, September 5, and ends Tuesday, December 5, 2017.

Note: This class is restricted to students admitted to the Washington DC Externship Program

Experiential Advocacy Practicum (Staff)
LWAA575

1 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Experiential

The Experiential Advocacy Practicum is a one-year, two credit course that has been designed to provide first-year students with an overview of two major areas of legal practice, litigation and transactional work. The practicum will incorporate learning-by-doing skills exercises that will simulate advocacy tasks that junior attorneys will be expected to perform in practice. Students will work, both in teams and as individuals, with a fictional case file, which will allow them to complete tasks within a realistic but simulated context. The practicum will supplement the first-year curriculum by giving a practical view of the theoretical concepts students are learning in other first-year doctrinal courses

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