Course Descriptions

Fall 2015 Class Descriptions

Education & Disability Clinic I (Margaret A. Dalton)
LWVL550

1-4 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): Health Law (JD), Children's Rights (JD)

Students receive practical training and experience in client intake, interviewing and counseling, file review and analysis, and legal representation in diverse forums. Some cases proceed to mediation and due process hearings, where students argue the case with support from the supervising attorney. Weekly group meetings are combined with individual case conferences to provide intensive personal training in case management. The classroom component also includes an overview of statutes and cases in this growing area of civil law. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites. Recommended: Special Education and the Law.

Note: This clinic may be applied towards the three required clinic credits for the Children's Rights Concentration (JD). There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Health Law Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information:Children's Rights Concentration, Health Law Concentration

Education & Disability Clinic II (Margaret A. Dalton)
LWVL551

1-4 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): Health Law (JD), Children's Rights (JD)

Clinic II interns refine their skills, working on complex cases and cases already begun as Clinic I interns. Students may mentor first time clinic participants, serve as lead attorney on cases, and have additional opportunities to appear in court or administrative proceedings. Supervising attorneys/adjunct professors provide individualized coaching, based on the Clinic II interns’ needs and interests. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Clinic I in the same clinic. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. 

Note: This clinic may be applied towards the three required clinic credits for the Children's Rights Concentration (JD). There are limitations on concentration eligibility. Please check the Health Law Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information:Children's Rights Concentration, Health Law Concentration

Employment Law (Orly Lobel)
LWPP537

4 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Employment and Labor Law (LLMG), Public Interest Law (JD), Employment and Labor Law (JD)

This course offers students an overview of the important legal issues that are raised in the context of the employment relationship. We will discuss employment as a contractual agreement, including tort and statutory protections, such as wrongful discharge, wage and hour laws (FLSA), leave (e.g., FMLA), safety (OSHA and workers comp), unemployment insurance, discrimination (Title VII; ADA; ADEA), privacy and freedom of speech, and intellectual property issues such as R&D ownership, trade secrets and non-competition clauses. Throughout the course, student will be able to deepen their study of contract law, torts, and statutory and regulatory processes through the context of the law of the workplace.

Note: This is a required course for the Employment and Labor Law Concentration (JD).

Energy Law & Policy (Carrie A. Downey)
LWPP540

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Environmental and Energy Law (MSLS), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMC), Environmental and Energy Law (JD)

Recognizing the importance of energy to the global economy and its role in global warming, Energy Law and Policy introduces students to the legal, regulatory, and economic concepts relevant to the changing electricity and natural gas industries in the U.S. The course will examine the history of and legal basis for regulation in the energy sector, including influential cases (e.g., Munn v. Illinois) and the federal statutory framework for energy sector regulation (e.g., PUHCA of 1935, PURPA of 1978, EPACT of 1992, EPACT of 2005). Students will review the administrative law process, focusing on the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), including the rate setting process for energy utilities and major regulatory orders and decisions that have shaped the industry. The course will trace the history of regulation in the electric and natural gas industries from early regulation to deregulation and discuss the current status of energy markets, including a detailed discussion of California’s energy crisis of 2000-2001. The course will examine the connection between energy and climate change and the range of market-based solutions currently being considered at the state, regional, and federal levels in the U.S. Students will also examine the role of distributed energy resources, including smart grid technologies, on-site solar energy technology, energy efficiency and demand response, in meeting future energy needs. Participants will be required to make an in-class presentation on a topical energy issue and to take a final examination.

Note: Either this course or Climate Change Law & Policy must be taken as a required course for the Environmental & Energy Law Concentration (JD).

Entertainment, Sports and Intellectual Property Internship Program (Beth Baier)
LWVL592

1 - 3 credit(s), P/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (LLMG), Employment and Labor Law (LLMG), Intellectual Property (LLMC), Intellectual Property (JD), Employment and Labor Law (JD)

The Entertainment, Sports and Intellectual Property Internship Program consists of a work component and a class component and allows students to earn academic credit for working in a law department of an entertainment or sports industry company, talent guild or trade association, or in the intellectual property law department of a company or trade association. Students work a minimum of 60 hours per unit of credit and may receive 1-3 credits. Students participate in primarily online class sessions involving small group discussions, prepare weekly summaries of their work and complete a writing assignment. If you have been accepted into an internship placement and want to apply for the internship course, fill out the ESIP application below. The Internship is graded on a Pass-Fail basis. If you have any other questions contact Julie Remer, Assistant Dean, Career and Professional Development at julieremer@sandiego.edu or Professor Margaret Dalton, Faculty Director, Clinical and Placement Education at mdalton@sandiego.edu.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the concentration web pages for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your internship qualifies for a concentration.
Additional Information:ESIP Application, JD Concentration Web Page, Email Law Student Affairs

Entrepreneurship Clinic I (Sebastian E. Lucier)
LWVL520

1-4 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills

This clinic provides transactional legal services targeting high technology business startups and other emerging growth companies. School of Law interns, under the direction of an experienced attorney, will provide counsel to a select number of clients. Interns will receive training in the key legal services needed by entrepreneurs, including structuring the business entity, financing regulations, drafting of investment and employment agreements, and protection of intellectual property. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

Entrepreneurship Clinic II (Sebastian E. Lucier)
LWVL521

1-4 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills

Clinic II interns refine their skills, working on complex cases and cases already begun as Clinic I interns. Students may mentor first time clinic participants, serve as lead attorney on cases, and have additional opportunities to appear in court or administrative proceedings. Supervising attorneys/adjunct professors provide individualized coaching, based on the Clinic II interns’ needs and interests. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Clinic I in the same clinic. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Environmental Law (Tim Duane)
LWEV520

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Environmental and Energy Law (MSLS), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMC), Public Interest Law (JD), Environmental and Energy Law (JD)

This survey course addresses the principles that govern environmental law, including the respective roles of the courts, state and federal agencies, and citizen groups. Federal environmental statues covered include: The National Environmental Policy Act, Endangered Species Act, Clear Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (Superfund). The course will also introduce California state environmental law through the California Environmental Quality Act and the Public Trust Doctrine.

Note: This is a required course for the Environmental & Energy Law (JD) concentration.
Additional Information:Environmental & Energy Law Concentration

European Union Commercial Law (Jens Schovsbo, Vibe Ulfbeck)
LWIC522

1 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): International Law (MSLS), Business and Corporate Law (MSLS), LLM in International Law (LLMI), International Law (LLMC), Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB), International Law (JD), Business and Corporate Law (JD)

As business is becoming more international so must the law and lawyers. In a world of international trade and transactions companies and their advisers need to have a global legal horizon. Until quite recently, it would not have made any practical sense to talk about an “EU commercial law”. However, due to the ongoing harmonization of the law of the EU countries a body of truly common European law is emerging from the melting pot of the national laws and traditions and EU institutions and courts. The course draws on the results of 30 years of continued and ongoing EU harmonization to provide US law students with an overview of some of the central aspects of European commercial law. The course focuses on the practical legal problems facing an American enterprise doing business in Europe but at the same time provides for a basic understanding of the EU legal framework. After a brief general introduction to EU law the course falls in two parts. Part I deals with the transfer of goods and covers such topics as general contract law (PECL Principles of European Contract Law), the EC directive on Unfair Contract Terms, and the EC directive on Products Liability. Part II deals with the trade in intangible rights notably patents and trademarks. This part opens with a general presentation of the European systems for the protection of inventions and trademarks. It then moves on to discuss aspects relating to the exercise of those rights in regard to the Treaty rules on the free movement of goods (“parallel importation” and the principle of “exhaustion of rights”) and to tech-trans agreements and other issues involving competition law. The course requires no prior knowledge of European law.  There will be a final exam scheduled in early November.

European Union Law (Ralph H. Folsom)
LWIC521

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Requirement(s): Writing
Concentration(s): International Law (MSLS), LLM in International Law (LLMI), International Law (LLMC), International Law (JD)

Law, policy and procedures of the European Union, including growth of the EU common market and its jurisdiction, law-making, litigation, freedoms of movement, common economic and social policies, the EURO, external trade relations, human rights, and business competition law. This is a paper course.

Evidence (Jean Ramirez, Michael Devitt)
LWLP529

4 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (MSLS), Criminal Law (LLMG), Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)

The rules of evidence in judicial tribunals, focusing on the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Evidence Code are addressed in this course. Also covered are issues relating to: (1) judicial control and administration - functions of judge and jury, judicial notice, burden of proof presumptions, problems of relevancy, circumstantial evidence, and unfair prejudice; and (2) witnesses - competency, privileges, principles of examination and cross-examination, impeachment and support, expert and lay opinion testimony. The hearsay rule and its exceptions, rules relating to writings, real and scientific evidence are also examined.

Note: This is a required course for the Civil Litigation (JD) and Criminal Litigation (JD) concentrations.

Executive Branch Regulatory Policy & Law (Orde Kittrie)
LWPP512

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded

This course examines selected advanced administrative law and regulatory policy issues relating to executive agencies. Through readings and case studies, students will gain an advanced understanding of how government agencies do what they do, and of the rules and institutions that control them. The focus of the course will be on U.S. federal government agencies, with some comparisons drawn to state institutions. Guest speakers from the public and private sector will be invited to meet with the class to describe their experiences.

Case studies, some from the textbook, others from newsworthy events, will help students focus on the role of the lawyer in government agency decision-making and relations with other stakeholders. A final paper (of approximately 20 pages in length) will be required. The final grade will consist of the following components: 1) final paper - 75%, 2) class participation – 25%.  This class starts Tuesday, September 8, and ends Tuesday, December 8, 2015.


Note: This class is restricted to students admitted to the Washington DC Externship Program

View by Semester

Click on a semester below, then narrow your search by choosing a sub-item.