Course Descriptions

Spring 2012 LLM in Business and Corporate Law Class Descriptions

Advanced Corporate Tax Problems (Richard A. Shaw)
LWTE508

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

A series of planning and structural problems involving advanced issues in corporate taxation will be discussed. The topics to be covered include advanced corporate asset disposition and distribution problems; redemptions; stock transfers and dividends; collapsible corporations; accumulated earnings tax; personal holding companies and S corporations. Prerequisite: Tax II (Corporate Tax). This is an advanced tax course with priority enrollment for LLM in Taxation students. This class meets for 10 sessions TBA.

Agency, Partnership & the LLC (Mark Lee)
LWBC502

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

This course is about the business issues that inevitably confront people working together and how the laws of the various forms of non-corporate business organizations -- agency, partnership, limited partnership, limited liability partnership (LLP), and limited liability company (LLC) -- resolve these issues. The focus will be on what, if anything, a lawyer can and should do about the resolutions provided by these laws. Students will be asked to provide advice to hypothetical clients about how they might achieve some of their goals while reducing the chances of pricey litigation. Because the focus of this course is the development of a set of skills, students will be asked to practice using these skills every day in class; the professor will ask sets of interrelated questions and will work with students to answer these questions. The instructor treats students as junior partners, according them the respect due and expecting them to shoulder the responsibilities of a junior partner.

Antitrust (Mark Lee)
LWBC503

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

In the name of two vaguely worded statutes, the Sherman Act and the Clayton Act, courts have regulated a wide variety of business practices including price-setting cartels, trade associations activities, distribution agreements, franchising, package selling, boycotts, long-term contracting, and mergers. This course focuses on the issues raised by this regulation. Understanding and formulating the arguments bearing on these issues requires the use of elementary microeconomics. Students without any economics background usually constitute the plurality of the class population. If you are among this plurality, you may experience a little intellectual discomfort, but you may take solace in the fact that, in several other years, some similarly situated students outperformed their classmates. The trick is to avoid falling into the trap of believing that wishing makes something so. I will assume that you have engaged in no prior study of microeconomics (unless each of you informs me otherwise), so I will explain the relevant economic concepts as they arise. When I am not explaining economic concepts – or summarizing a course unit – I will direct class discussion about cases and problems. I will do this by asking a set of interrelated questions designed to (a) lead students to a particular insight and (b) serve as a model for analysis. Your course grade will not be less than the grade that you achieve on the (very traditional) final examination, but it may be one grading increment higher if you make a relatively strong net intellectual contribution to class.

Note: There are limitations on Intellectual Property (JD) concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Intellectual Property Concentration

Business Torts (Paul Horton)
LWBC524

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

Business Torts is a three-credit upper-division course that surveys the main common-law tort claims, defenses, and remedies, as well as sampling various statutory claims and remedies associated with non-criminal commercial litigation. Topics include conversion, unfair competition, interference with contract, injurious falsehood, trade secret misappropriation, misrepresentation, deceptive advertising, and Civil RICO. Students are encouraged to take Business Torts prior to or while they are taking such courses as trademarks, antitrust, securities litigation, intellectual property, employment law, and creditors' remedies. At the instructor's option, the course grade may be based in whole or in part on a paper.

Note: There are limitations on Intellectual Property (JD) concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Intellectual Property Concentration

Corporate Finance (Robert Jafek)
LWBC530

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)
Prerequisite(s): Corporations

This course covers the core concepts of finance as they relate to the study and practice of law. Topics include financial statement analysis, capital budgeting, valuation of stocks and bonds, risk management, portfolio theory, derivatives, and corporate financial management. The course includes quantitative concepts and exercises, and students are required to use a spreadsheet program, such as Microsoft Excel.

Corporate Reorganization (M. Carr Ferguson)
LWTE510

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

This course considers the tax treatment of corporations and shareholders in corporate acquisitive reorganizations, single corporation reorganizations and corporate divisions, including carryovers. Tax II is recommended but not required. Prerequisite: Tax I and Corporations: Tax II is recommended but not required. This is an advanced tax course with priority enrollment for LLM in Taxation students.

Corporations (Lynne L. Dallas, Christopher T. Wonnell)
LWBC545

4 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

This course examines the structure and the rights and obligations of directors, officers, and shareholders mainly under state corporations law. Other topics include partnerships and limited liability entities. The course covers, among other subjects, the characteristics of the corporation as distinct from other forms of business association, the special problems of the closely-held corporations (a corporation owned by a few persons), the fiduciary obligations of directors and controlling shareholders in closely-held and public corporations, procedures for decision making by directors and shareholders, shareholder voting rights, and certain federal securities law subjects, such as insider trading.

Note: This is a required course for the Business and Corporate Law Concentration (JD) and the LLM in Business & Corporate Law.

High Tech Start Ups (Thomas A. Smith)
LWBC587

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

This course covers the legal principles and some of the tax law applicable to a series of interesting, complex, and current entrepreneurial transactions, utilizing venture capital or private equity financing. The course will cover, time permitting, as many as possible of the following: (1) a new business start up (with emphasis on high technology sectors); (2) a growth equity investment in an existing business enterprise; (3) a leveraged buyout of a private or a public company (including a going-private transaction); (4) use of a flow-through tax entity such as an S corporation, a partnership, or an LLC, for a variety of venture capital or private equity financed transactions; (5) devising an exit scenario for the successful venture capital or private equity financed enterprise (such as IPO, SEC rule 144 sales, or sale of the company); and (6) forming a new venture capital, LBO, or private equity fund. Substantive subjects touched upon include federal income tax, securities regulation, corporate law, partnership law, LLC law, bankruptcy law, fraudulent conveyance law, and other legal doctrines and accounting rules and practical structuring issue relevant to entrepreneurial transactions (including use of common and preferred stocks, convertible debentures and convertible preferred, warrants, and options). The course reviews these in a transactional context and may also consider to some extent their policy underpinnings and likely future evolution. Corporations is a prerequisite. Introductory Income Tax is recommended, and Taxation of Corporations is desirable, as are Securities Law, and Corporate Finance, and related courses.

Note: There are limitations on Intellectual Property (JD) concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Intellectual Property Concentration

International Sales (William H. Lawrence)
LWIC555

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

This course focuses on the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods (CISG), with comparisons to domestic law (the UCC in particular). Considerable time is devoted to the application of the CISG to problems that typically arise in international sales transactions. The course does not include an exam. Students instead prepare written memos that reflect the type of assignments they can expect in practice with a law firm.

Mergers and Acquisitions (Thomas A. Smith)
LWBC570

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

This course will examine selected economic, corporate law, and securities law aspects of the acquisition of businesses. Topics covered will include some basic (and necessary) corporate finance theory (such as valuation, efficient capital markets, event studies and option pricing theory); empirical evidence on the social costs and benefits of acquisition activity; the structuring of friendly and hostile acquisitions; the corporate law of takeover defenses; and securities law regulation of acquisition transactions. Some accounting and tax law topics may be touched upon, but they will not be a major focus of the course. Some effort will be made to examine drafting and negotiations aspects of M&A transactions. Corporations is a prerequisite. Students with substantial background in related areas may take Corporations concurrently, with permission. There will be a final exam in the class.

Securities Regulation (Michael P. McCloskey)
LWBC580

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)
Prerequisite(s): Corporations or concurrent enrollment

The Securities Regulation class will include an overview of the capital markets and the underwriting process, the structure and prohibitions of the Securities Act, the registration process, the definitions of security and exempted securities, the private and limited offering exemptions, offerings by underwriters, affiliates and dealers, civil liability under the Securities Act, fraud in connection with a purchase or sale of a Security, and general civil liability provisions. Prerequisite: Corporations must be taken prior to or concurrently with this course.

Note: This is a required course for the Business and Corporate Law Concentration (JD).

UCC: Sales (David W. Brennan)
LWBC592

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

The course on sales of goods addresses the provisions of Article 2 of the U.C.C., with some comparisons with the new Article 2A on leases of goods. The primary topics include contract formation and enforceability, terms of the contract, risk of loss, warranties, performance and breach, remedies for breach, and transfer of goods. A problem-solving approach is used extensively.

White Collar Crime (Jason A. Forge, Eric J. Beste)
LWBC595

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

The course will cover a variety of topics related to the defense and prosecution of "white collar" criminal offenses, with a particular focus on emerging trends in the law arising from recent corporate scandals and prosecutions. The lectures will emphasize strategies for conducting internal investigations of corporations and their officers and directors, as well as tactics used by law enforcement in conducting white collar grand jury investigations and criminal prosecutions. In this regard, the course will be geared towards students interested in pursuing careers as prosecutors or criminal defense attorneys, as well as those who may represent corporate clients generally. Top ^
Note: Students may only elect this course or Federal Crimes to count toward the Criminal Litigation Concentration (JD).

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