Course Descriptions

Summer 2012 Class Descriptions

Child Advocacy Clinic: Delinquency II (Robert C. Fellmeth)
LWVL504

4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)
Prerequisite(s): See course description

Students work with assigned attorneys from the San Diego Office of the Public Defender, representing juveniles in delinquency court proceedings. Students are exposed to a wide variety of experiences, such as interviewing their minor clients; preparing briefs and motions; participating in hearings and conferences; coordinating with probation officers, investigators, etc.; and making court appearances as necessary and appropriate. Delinquency Clinic students must commit 20 hours per week to their Clinic work, and there is an additional one-hour classroom component each week. Students must have completed or be enrolled in Evidence, Civil Procedure and Child Rights and Remedies. Clinic slots are limited; students must obtain a permission slip from Professor Robert Fellmeth or Elisa Weichel before registering for the course.

Child Advocacy Clinic: Dependency II (Robert C. Fellmeth)
LWVL507

4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)
Prerequisite(s): See course description

Students work with assigned attorneys from the Dependency Legal Group of San Diego, representing abused and neglected children in dependency court proceedings. Students are exposed to a wide variety of experiences, such as interviewing child clients; presenting evidence during bench trials; preparing briefs and memoranda; participating in settlement conferences; conducting field work with investigators; and making court appearances as necessary and appropriate. Dependency Clinic students must commit 16 hours per week to their Clinic work, and there is an additional one-hour classroom component each week. Students must have completed or be enrolled in Evidence, Civil Procedure and Child Rights and Remedies. Clinic slots are limited; students must obtain a permission slip from Professor Robert Fellmeth or Elisa Weichel before registering for the course.

Child Advocacy Clinic: Policy I & II (Robert C. Fellmeth)
LWVL505

1-3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)
Prerequisite(s): See course description

Students work with assigned attorneys from the Dependency Legal Group of San Diego, representing abused and neglected children in dependency court proceedings. Students are exposed to a wide variety of experiences, such as interviewing child clients; presenting evidence during bench trials; preparing briefs and memoranda; participating in settlement conferences; conducting field work with investigators; and making court appearances as necessary and appropriate. Dependency Clinic students must commit 16 hours per week to their Clinic work, and there is an additional one-hour classroom component each week. Students must have completed or be enrolled in Evidence, Civil Procedure and Child Rights and Remedies. Clinic slots are limited; students must obtain a permission slip from Professor Robert Fellmeth or Elisa Weichel before registering for the course.

Civil Clinic I (Allen Gruber)
LWVL510

1-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure, Evidence, LSII or Practicum

Students interview, counsel and represent clients at Superior Court or in administrative hearings in a wide variety of cases under the supervision of an attorney. Students draft pleadings and correspondence, as well as confer and negotiate with opposing counsel/parties. Weekly group meetings are combined with individual case conferences to provide intensive personal training in litigation techniques, problem solving and case management. Students also learn general civil litigation practice and procedures. Prerequisites: Civil Procedure, Evidence and either Practicum or Lawyering Skills II. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Civil Litigation Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Civil Litigation Concentration

Civil Clinic II (Allen Gruber)
LWVL511

1-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure, Evidence, LSII or Practicum

Students interview, counsel and represent clients at Superior Court or in administrative hearings in a wide variety of cases under the supervision of an attorney. Students draft pleadings and correspondence, as well as confer and negotiate with opposing counsel/parties. Weekly group meetings are combined with individual case conferences to provide intensive personal training in litigation techniques, problem solving and case management. Students also learn general civil litigation practice and procedures. Prerequisites: Civil Procedure, Evidence and either Practicum or Lawyering Skills II. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Civil Litigation Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Civil Litigation Concentration

Civil Rights Theories Seminar (Roy L. Brooks)
LWPP521

3 credit(s)

This seminar will study closely several systems of accepted knowledge about how our government regulates or should regulate race relations during this Post-Civil Rights Era. These racial paradigms provide the subtext of public and, to a lesser extent, private institutional decision making, and are often debated within the pages of Supreme Court cases. While references will be made to Supreme Court cases and to specific justices, the seminar will focus on primary sources; in other words, the texts that generate fundamental civil rights theories. The readings will be interdisciplinary (drawing on legal, sociological, economic, psychological, historical, and political themes) and will stress the importance of contextualization. A conceptual scheme will be offered to help students understand, organize, and analyze civil rights theories; but students will be asked to develop their own well-informed views about the theories. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a paper plus weekly oral and written classroom presentations. Class attendance is essential.

Comparative Legal Traditions (Thomas Lundmark)
LWIC517

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing

This course offers an in-depth comparison of the actors (lawyers, judges, and lay judges and jurors) and of certain linguistic, philosophical, and methodological features of four jurisdictions: Germany, Sweden, England and Wales, and the United States. The approach taken is to compare these jurisdictions on the basis of their languages, their conceptions of law, their primary actors, and their methods of dealing with legal rules (legal reasoning, statutes and their construction, and use of judicial precedents). In doing so, the course will make predictions about what developments might be expected in the future. In their research paper, students will be expected to compare two jurisdictions on the basis of one of these aspects, or on the basis of some other aspect approved by the instructor. At least one of the jurisdictions chosen for the comparison must be Germany, Sweden, England and Wales, the United States, or an American state or territory such as Puerto Rico. This class begins Monday, July 9 and ends Thursday, July 26, 2012.

Corporate Counsel Internship ( Staff)
LWVL591

1-3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property (JD)

The Corporate Counsel Internship Program consists of a work component and a class component. The Corporate Counsel Internship Program allows students to receive academic credit for working in the legal department of a corporation, company or other business entity. Students may also work in other departments of a corporation as long as they are supervised by a licensed attorney. The goal of the Program is to provide students with the opportunity to observe first-hand the operations of a corporate legal department and to gain an understanding of the legal issues addressed by corporate counsel. The student must not receive monetary compensation or any outside funding for or related to the work and must be supervised by an on-site lawyer. Students can secure their own internship placements or meet with the Internship Director or Career Services for guidance. Placements qualify for the Program only if the organization requires that a student receive academic credit as a condition of the internship. Organizations willing to pay students or to have them work on a volunteer basis do not qualify for the Program. After a placement is found, students must complete an Application Form to have their placement approved for the Program. Employers who participate in the Program must commit to the requirements of the Program. Students work a minimum of 60 hours per unit of credit and may receive 1-3 credits. Students participate in primarily on-line class sessions involving small group discussions, prepare weekly summaries of their work and complete a writing assignment. If you have been accepted into an internship placement and want to apply for the internship course, fill out the Corporate Counsel application. If you have any other questions, email Lizzette Herrera Castellanos or call (619) 260-2342. The internship is graded on a Pass-Fail basis.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your work in this clinic qualifies for the concentration.
Additional Information: Intellectual Property Concentration, Email Law Student Affairs

Corporate Tax Reporting (Joshua Maxwell)
LWAA510

1 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)
Prerequisite(s): Tax II or similar undergraduate course upon approval

In corporate transactions and business operations, it is necessary for tax lawyers to advise on compliance issues and be able to understand information reported on IRS forms. This course will discuss corporate tax compliance, forms, and common issues, with a focus on extracting information from the face of the forms and how common transactions are reported. The class will cover Form 1120, Form 5471 and foreign reporting, common elections and disclosures, tax income adjustments (Schedule M), and other related topics. Class attendance will be required and essential to learning the topics. Grade based on a final exam covering common issues, basic compliance logistics, and the ability to analyze and gather information from IRS reporting.
Note: This is an advanced tax course with priority enrollment for LLM in Taxation students. JD students can apply through the Graduate Programs office.

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