Course Descriptions

Spring 2014 Criminal Law Class Descriptions

Advanced Legal Writing (Janice L. Sperow)
LWGC505

1 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)

Advanced Legal Writing is a new one-unit course specifically designed to help students strengthen their fundamental legal writing skills. The class will help students master the skills needed to be a good legal writer, including :Selecting active and powerful word choices; Constructing paragraphs; Using proper grammar and punctuation; Creating a strong micro and macro legal structure; Developing thesis and conclusion sentences; Issue spotting; Extracting, formulating, and synthesizing rules of law; Crafting explicit factual comparisons; and Revising, editing and perfecting their work product. The class will also include workshops on “The Secrets of Successful Legal Writing Students” and “How to Ace Your Final & Bar Exam Essays.” Students will learn through lecture, in-class exercises, outside-class exercises, workshops, one-on-one TA and Professor sessions and practice. The class requires no outside research. It will be graded H, P, LP and F. Students may only enroll in two of the following during their law school career: Advanced Legal Writing OR LWR III: Lit & Judicial Drafting OR LWR III: Legal Writing OR Legal Drafting. Students desiring to add the second class in this series must receive a signature on their add/drop form from the Office for JD Student Affairs, and provide the form to the Registrar office (that is, students cannot add the second class themselves online.)

Advanced Trial Advocacy (Lynne Lasry)
LWLP515

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Trial Advocacy (Oral Advocacy/LSII), Evidence

A course combining one hour per week of demonstrations and lecture with a two hour per week workshop involving critique of individual student performances in a number of the more difficult areas of trial practice. Students are videotaped during certain skills over the semester with feedback from instructors and practitioners. In addition to the weekly skills sessions, students perform at least one bench trial and one jury trial. The class will also address and consider the use of trial presentation technology at trial, and the intricacies of examining experts and children. There will be minor written requirements related to the skill of the week. This is an intensive course designed to focus on individual presentation skills. Prerequisites: Trial Advocacy (Oral Advocacy/LS II) and Evidence. Enrollment is limited. Students are graded by the standard letter grading system.

Agency Internships (John Sansone)
LWVL596

1-3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)

The Agency Internship Program consists of a work component and a class component. The Agency Internship Program allows students to earn academic credit for working in a law related internship position. Students work a minimum of 60 hours per unit of credit and may receive 1-3 credits. For the work component, students intern with a government agency or a nonprofit organization. During the school year, the internship employer must be in the civil field or criminal appellate law field. Students participate in primarily on-line class sessions involving small group discussions, prepare weekly summaries of their work and complete a writing assignment. If you have been accepted into an internship placement and want to apply for the internship course, fill out the Internship application. If you have any other questions, email Lizzette Herrera Castellanos, Director of Agency Internship Programs or call(619) 260-2342. The internship is graded on a Pass-Fail basis.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the concentration web pages for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your Agency Internship qualifies for a concentration.
Additional Information: Concentrations Web Page, Email Law Student Affairs

Criminal Clinic I (Jean Ramirez)
LWVL515

3-6 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, Trial Advocacy/Oral Adv Skills or Practicum, Criminal Law
Recommended Class(es): Criminal Procedure II

This course focuses on the knowledge and skills required to litigate criminal cases in the trial courts. Students intern with an approved defense or prosecution trial agency in the criminal justice system. Students also meet in class for two hours each week. The class component tracks a fictitious, but realistic, criminal case from arrest through sentencing, but not trial, providing students with an overview of the process. Students participate in simulation exercises at various stages of the case and participate in discussions on relevant topics. Prerequisites may be taken concurrently with the instructor’s permission. Students seeking permission to take one or more prerequisites concurrently must make an appointment to discuss the matter with the course instructor in a face-to-face meeting. This variable credit course is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. Course credit is based on completion of a minimum number of internship hours: 3 credits-60 hours, 4 credits-120 hours, 5 credits-180 hours, and 6 credits-240 hours.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Criminal Litigation Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Criminal Litigation Concentration, Application

Criminal Procedure I (Kevin Cole)
LWCR520

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)

This course explores constitutional limitations upon the investigation of crime under the fourth, fifth, sixth and fourteenth amendments. Its focus is on the law governing searches, seizures, and police interrogation. Topics include the nature of a fourth amendment search; arrest and investigative detention; warrants and exceptions to the warrant requirement; confessions; and the application of the exclusionary rules.

Note: This is a required course for the Criminal Litigation Concentration (JD).

Criminal Procedure II (Hon. Richard Huffman)
LWCR525

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Criminal Procedure I

In this advanced criminal procedure class, students will continue the study commenced in Criminal Procedure I, focusing on the processing of a criminal defendant through the criminal justice system. The course will address a number of issues regularly presented in criminal cases, including the charging process, the right to a speedy trial, criminal discovery and disclosure, the right to jury trial, the right to effective assistance of counsel, the right to confrontation and the exercise of the privilege against self incrimination at trial. In addition the course will include discussions of the principles of the right against double jeopardy, and post conviction remedies such as direct appeal and petitions for habeas corpus. The purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of the basic structure of the criminal process in a federal system of government as well as the basic principles underlying the constitutional and procedural protections of the criminal justice system.

Note: This is a required course for the Criminal Litigation Concentration (JD).

Evidence (Donald A. Dripps, Jean Ramirez)
LWLP529

4 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)

The rules of evidence in judicial tribunals, focusing on the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Evidence Code are addressed in this course. Also covered are issues relating to: (1) judicial control and administration - functions of judge and jury, judicial notice, burden of proof presumptions, problems of relevancy, circumstantial evidence, and unfair prejudice; and (2) witnesses - competency, privileges, principles of examination and cross-examination, impeachment and support, expert and lay opinion testimony. The hearsay rule and its exceptions, rules relating to writings, real and scientific evidence are also examined.

Note: This is a required course for the Civil Litigation (JD) and Criminal Litigation (JD) concentrations.

Evidence Advocacy Lab (Laura M. Berend, Lisa Rodriguez)
LWLP530

1 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Evidence

This course is designed to familiarize students with the practical application of evidentiary points addressed in the traditional evidence course. Students focus on one or two evidentiary issues each week using a problem format. Each area of evidence is taught through performance. Each student is assigned as a proponent, opponent, witness and judge and is responsible for performing that role in class each week, and for submitting a short memo identifying the evidentiary issue and presenting the best approach to offering or opposing the evidence in court. The roles rotate each week. There is a new problem assigned each week. By the end of the semester, each student should be comfortably able to determine what it is he or she wished to accomplish in a courtroom with respect to specific evidentiary questions, and be able to structure the most logical, persuasive and trouble-free means to that end. Evidence is a prerequisite. The course is graded on a 4-tier Pass/Fail basis.

Judicial Internship (Paul Horton)
LWVL598

1 - 6 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)

The Judicial Internship Program allows students to receive academic credit for work in a judge's chambers in San Diego. Students must work 60 hours per unit of credit. In addition to the work component of the Program, students enrolled in the program will have regular contact with the Program's instructor, Professor Horton, who will meet with students individually, assign various written projects (such as a journal and a final paper), and review samples of the student's written work from the internship. The program is limited to a total of 20 students per semester or summer term. Preference is given to students who are in, or who are about to enter, their final law school year. Professor Horton has a manual that explains the judicial internship process; interested students should be sure to pick up a copy of the manual. Students can secure their own internship position or can meet with Professor Horton for guidance in securing a placement. The internship is graded on a Pass-Fail basis.

Note: Students must receive approval from Professor Horton to register for this program. There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the concentration web pages for more information.
Additional Information: Civil Litigation Concentration, Criminal Litigation Concentration

Scientific Evidence (Hon. Howard Shore)
LWCR570

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Evidence

This course will address the technical requirements under California law for admissibility of both established and new forms of scientific evidence. Possible topics include fingerprints, serology, odontology, DNA and others. Students will apply the principles of admissibility by participating in realistic foundational hearings in the classroom, and will present papers on specific forms of scientific evidence. Prerequisite: Evidence

Trial Advocacy (LS II/Oral Advocacy) (Linda L. Lane)
LWLP550

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)

This is an upper class course focused on the skills of case analysis and oral presentation of those cases to judges and juries on civil or criminal trials. The course also includes developing skills used in the discovery phase of civil cases, especially depositions. The course is specifically designed to expand the skills introduced to the student in Legal Research & Writing. The course methodology combines lectures, demonstrations and individual student performances in small groups with extensive critique and feedback by small group instructors who are experienced practitioners. The course culminates in a mock trial. The course is graded on a 4-tier Pass/Fail basis. The previous name of this course was Lawyering Skills II/Oral Advocacy.

Note: Students may only elect this course or Practicum--Civil to count toward the Civil Litigation Concentration (JD).
Additional Information: Civil Litigation Concentration

White Collar Crime (Eric J. Beste, Jason A. Forge)
LWBC595

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)

The course will cover a variety of topics related to the defense and prosecution of "white collar" criminal offenses, with a particular focus on emerging trends in the law arising from recent corporate scandals and prosecutions. The lectures will emphasize strategies for conducting internal investigations of corporations and their officers and directors, as well as tactics used by law enforcement in conducting white collar grand jury investigations and criminal prosecutions. In this regard, the course will be geared towards students interested in pursuing careers as prosecutors or criminal defense attorneys, as well as those who may represent corporate clients generally.
Note: Students may only elect this course or Federal Crimes to count toward the Criminal Litigation Concentration (JD).

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