Course Descriptions

Spring 2012 Class Descriptions

Adv. Chapter 11 Reorganization (Philip J. Giacinti, Jr.)
LWBC500

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Prerequisite(s): Bankruptcy

This course focuses on business reorganization under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code. It features lectures followed by practical application by teams of students divided into the roles of debtor-in-possession counsel, official creditors committee counsel, and secured creditor counsel. The teams of students will be provided a troubled business, inclusive of assets, liabilities, secured and unsecured debt. Presented with financial statements, schedules and a statement of affairs, the student teams will rotate roles as debtor-in-possession counsel, creditor committee counsel, secured creditor counsel and U.S. Trustee. The teams will prepare pleadings, present and argue critical phases of the business reorganization process and seek confirmation of a Chapter 11 plan of reorganization. A basic Bankruptcy course is a prerequisite. Grading will be in the traditional letter grading scale. Final grade will be based on exam, plus plan and disclosure statement presentations.

Adv. Issues in Climate & Energy Law (Jody Freeman)
LWEV502

1 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG)

This course will cover selected advanced topics in energy and climate law and policy, including biofuels, renewable energy, and nuclear energy. We will also discuss challenges associated with traditional fossil fuel production, including natural gas fracking and offshore drilling (using lessons from the BP oil spill). We will also discuss other salient issues that have come to the fore during the Obama administration, including the president’s authority to use executive power to address climate change in the face of legislative inaction. Although there are no pre-requisites, the introductory course in environmental law, or the course in climate change, will be helpful. This course will be graded on daily comment papers of 1-2 pages and a short final paper (approximately 5 pages) on a topic of the student’s choice.

Advanced Corporate Tax Problems (Richard A. Shaw)
LWTE508

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), Business and Corporate Law (JD), LLM in Taxation (LLMT), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

A series of planning and structural problems involving advanced issues in corporate taxation will be discussed. The topics to be covered include advanced corporate asset disposition and distribution problems; redemptions; stock transfers and dividends; collapsible corporations; accumulated earnings tax; personal holding companies and S corporations. Prerequisite: Tax II (Corporate Tax). This is an advanced tax course with priority enrollment for LLM in Taxation students. This class meets for 10 sessions TBA.

Advanced Legal Research (Karl Gruben)
LWLP512

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

This class will offer an in-depth analysis of legal research methods and sources, covering both print and electronic formats, to develop an understanding of legal research as a process. Classes include a combination of lectures, discussions of readings and techniques, online training, and might include presentations by guest lecturers. Emphasis is placed on critically evaluating the content and organization of research resources, regardless of format, and understanding their appropriate use, to illustrate that research is approached as both a skill and an intellectual endeavor. The student should finish the class with a deeper understanding of the tools of legal research and with an ability to use those tools, either print or electronic, commercial or free, to engage in high quality, cost effective legal research. Students are graded by the standard letter grading system.

Advanced Legal Writing (Janice L. Sperow)
LWGC505

1 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD), Criminal Litigation (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Permission Required

Advanced Legal Writing is a new one-unit course specifically designed to help students strengthen their fundamental legal writing skills. The class will help students master the skills needed to be a good legal writer, including :Selecting active and powerful word choices; Constructing paragraphs; Using proper grammar and punctuation; Creating a strong micro and macro legal structure; Developing thesis and conclusion sentences; Issue spotting; Extracting, formulating, and synthesizing rules of law; Crafting explicit factual comparisons; and Revising, editing and perfecting their work product. The class will also include workshops on “The Secrets of Successful Legal Writing Students” and “How to Ace Your Final & Bar Exam Essays.” Students will learn through lecture, in-class exercises, outside-class exercises, workshops, one-on-one TA and Professor sessions and practice. The class requires no outside research. It will be graded H, P, LP and F.

Note: Students interested in taking this course need pre-approval from the professor.
Additional Information: Request approval

Advanced Trial Advocacy (Lynne Lasry)
LWLP515

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Lawyering Skills II, Evidence

A course combining one hour per week of demonstrations and lecture with a two hour per week workshop involving critique of individual student performances in a number of the more difficult areas of trial practice. Students are videotaped during certain skills over the semester with feedback from instructors and practitioners. In addition to the weekly skills sessions, students perform at least one bench trial and one jury trial. The class will also address and consider the use of trial presentation technology at trial, and the intricacies of examining experts and children. There will be minor written requirements related to the skill of the week. This is an intensive course designed to focus on individual presentation skills. Prerequisites: Lawyering Skills II and Evidence. Enrollment is limited. Students are graded by the standard letter grading system.

Agency Internships (John Sansone)
LWVL596

1-3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD), LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

The Agency Internship Program consists of a work component and a class component. The Agency Internship Program allows students to earn academic credit for working in a law related internship position. Students work a minimum of 60 hours per unit of credit and may receive 1-3 credits. For the work component, students intern with a government agency or a nonprofit organization. During the school year, the internship employer must be in the civil field or criminal appellate law field. Students participate in primarily on-line class sessions involving small group discussions, prepare weekly summaries of their work and complete a writing assignment. If you have been accepted into an internship placement and want to apply for the internship course, fill out the Internship application. If you have any other questions, email Lizzette Herrera Castellanos, Director of Agency Internship Programs or call(619) 260-2342. The internship is graded on a Pass-Fail basis.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the concentration web pages for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your Agency Internship qualifies for a concentration.
Additional Information: Concentrations Web Page, Email Law Student Affairs

Agency, Partnership & the LLC (Mark Lee)
LWBC502

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

This course is about the business issues that inevitably confront people working together and how the laws of the various forms of non-corporate business organizations -- agency, partnership, limited partnership, limited liability partnership (LLP), and limited liability company (LLC) -- resolve these issues. The focus will be on what, if anything, a lawyer can and should do about the resolutions provided by these laws. Students will be asked to provide advice to hypothetical clients about how they might achieve some of their goals while reducing the chances of pricey litigation. Because the focus of this course is the development of a set of skills, students will be asked to practice using these skills every day in class; the professor will ask sets of interrelated questions and will work with students to answer these questions. The instructor treats students as junior partners, according them the respect due and expecting them to shoulder the responsibilities of a junior partner.

Antitrust (Mark Lee)
LWBC503

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), Intellectual Property (JD), Business and Corporate Law (JD), Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

In the name of two vaguely worded statutes, the Sherman Act and the Clayton Act, courts have regulated a wide variety of business practices including price-setting cartels, trade associations activities, distribution agreements, franchising, package selling, boycotts, long-term contracting, and mergers. This course focuses on the issues raised by this regulation. Understanding and formulating the arguments bearing on these issues requires the use of elementary microeconomics. Students without any economics background usually constitute the plurality of the class population. If you are among this plurality, you may experience a little intellectual discomfort, but you may take solace in the fact that, in several other years, some similarly situated students outperformed their classmates. The trick is to avoid falling into the trap of believing that wishing makes something so. I will assume that you have engaged in no prior study of microeconomics (unless each of you informs me otherwise), so I will explain the relevant economic concepts as they arise. When I am not explaining economic concepts – or summarizing a course unit – I will direct class discussion about cases and problems. I will do this by asking a set of interrelated questions designed to (a) lead students to a particular insight and (b) serve as a model for analysis. Your course grade will not be less than the grade that you achieve on the (very traditional) final examination, but it may be one grading increment higher if you make a relatively strong net intellectual contribution to class.

Note: There are limitations on Intellectual Property (JD) concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Intellectual Property Concentration

Appellate Clinic (Michael Devitt, Candace M. Carroll, Pamela M. Parker)
LWVL501

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure, Evidence or concurrent enrollment, Professional Responsibility or concurrently, Crim Pro I or concurrent enrollment

The Appellate Clinic is a year-long clinic opportunity in which teams of students will enjoy the hands-on experience of litigating from start to finish an appeal before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. During the fall semester, students will write an opening brief; and in the spring semester students will write a reply brief and participate in oral argument. Additional periodic classroom sessions held throughout the academic year will focus upon appellate procedure and persuasive written and oral advocacy. From time to time, class sessions will feature guest speakers such as judges and local practicing attorneys. Students will receive four credits (two in the fall semester and two in the spring semester) for successfully completing the year long Appellate Clinic. This clinic will be graded on a four-tier pass/fail basis. The Appellate Clinic is open only to third and fourth year law students; and students must have completed or take concurrently with the Appellate Clinic the following courses: Civil Procedure, Evidence, Professional Responsibility, and Criminal Procedure.

Business Torts (Paul Horton)
LWBC524

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), Intellectual Property (JD), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

Business Torts is a three-credit upper-division course that surveys the main common-law tort claims, defenses, and remedies, as well as sampling various statutory claims and remedies associated with non-criminal commercial litigation. Topics include conversion, unfair competition, interference with contract, injurious falsehood, trade secret misappropriation, misrepresentation, deceptive advertising, and Civil RICO. Students are encouraged to take Business Torts prior to or while they are taking such courses as trademarks, antitrust, securities litigation, intellectual property, employment law, and creditors' remedies. At the instructor's option, the course grade may be based in whole or in part on a paper.

Note: There are limitations on Intellectual Property (JD) concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Intellectual Property Concentration

California Civil Procedure (Walter Heiser)
LWLP520

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD)

This course is designed for upperclass law students who intend to practice law in California and therefore may wish to learn more about California civil procedure. The course will focus on the important caselaw doctrines, statutory rules, and policies which define civil litigation in the California courts with particular attention to those areas of California civil procedure that are unique when compared to federal and to other states' procedural laws. The topics covered will include considerations before undertaking representation; statutes of limitations and related doctrines; California conflicts of law doctrine; jurisdiction, venue, forum non conveniens, and service of process; prejudgment attachment and other provisional remedies; claim and issue preclusion; pleadings and motions; joinder of parties and claims, new party cross-complaints, equitable indemnity, and good faith settlements; the California Civil Discovery Act; summary judgments, default judgments, involuntary dismissals for failure to prosecute, the “fast track” system, and judicial and contractual arbitration; right to jury trial, trial procedures, and post-trial motions; judgments, enforcement of judgments, and setting aside judgments; and appeals, extraordinary appellate writs, and administrative mandamus. The course will also provide students with a brief summary of the federal or general position on each major topic covered as a basis of comparison and as a review of basic civil procedure.

Child Advocacy Clinic: Delinquency I (Robert C. Fellmeth)
LWVL503

4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)
Prerequisite(s): See course description

Students work with assigned attorneys from the San Diego Office of the Public Defender, representing juveniles in delinquency court proceedings. Students are exposed to a wide variety of experiences, such as interviewing their minor clients; preparing briefs and motions; participating in hearings and conferences; coordinating with probation officers, investigators, etc.; and making court appearances as necessary and appropriate. Delinquency Clinic students must commit 20 hours per week to their Clinic work, and there is an additional one-hour classroom component each week. Students must have completed or be enrolled in Evidence, Civil Procedure and Child Rights and Remedies. Clinic slots are limited; students must obtain a permission slip from Professor Robert Fellmeth or Elisa Weichel before registering for the course.

Child Advocacy Clinic: Delinquency II (Robert C. Fellmeth)
LWVL504

1-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)
Prerequisite(s): See course description

Students work with assigned attorneys from the San Diego Office of the Public Defender, representing juveniles in delinquency court proceedings. Students are exposed to a wide variety of experiences, such as interviewing their minor clients; preparing briefs and motions; participating in hearings and conferences; coordinating with probation officers, investigators, etc.; and making court appearances as necessary and appropriate. Delinquency Clinic students must commit 20 hours per week to their Clinic work, and there is an additional one-hour classroom component each week. Students must have completed or be enrolled in Evidence, Civil Procedure and Child Rights and Remedies. Clinic slots are limited; students must obtain a permission slip from Professor Robert Fellmeth or Elisa Weichel before registering for the course.

Child Advocacy Clinic: Dependency I & II (Robert C. Fellmeth)
LWVL507

4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)
Prerequisite(s): See course description

Students work with assigned attorneys from the Dependency Legal Group of San Diego, representing abused and neglected children in dependency court proceedings. Students are exposed to a wide variety of experiences, such as interviewing child clients; presenting evidence during bench trials; preparing briefs and memoranda; participating in settlement conferences; conducting field work with investigators; and making court appearances as necessary and appropriate. Dependency Clinic students must commit 16 hours per week to their Clinic work, and there is an additional one-hour classroom component each week. Students must have completed or be enrolled in Evidence, Civil Procedure and Child Rights and Remedies. Clinic slots are limited; students must obtain a permission slip from Professor Robert Fellmeth or Elisa Weichel before registering for the course.

Child Advocacy Clinic: Dependency I & II (Robert C. Fellmeth)
LWVL507

4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)
Prerequisite(s): See course description

Students work with assigned attorneys from the Dependency Legal Group of San Diego, representing abused and neglected children in dependency court proceedings. Students are exposed to a wide variety of experiences, such as interviewing child clients; presenting evidence during bench trials; preparing briefs and memoranda; participating in settlement conferences; conducting field work with investigators; and making court appearances as necessary and appropriate. Dependency Clinic students must commit 16 hours per week to their Clinic work, and there is an additional one-hour classroom component each week. Students must have completed or be enrolled in Evidence, Civil Procedure and Child Rights and Remedies. Clinic slots are limited; students must obtain a permission slip from Professor Robert Fellmeth or Elisa Weichel before registering for the course.

Child Advocacy Clinic: Policy I & II (Robert C. Fellmeth)
LWVL505

1-3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)

Students work with CAI professional staff on legislative and regulatory policy advocacy projects, impact litigation, public education projects, and/or policy research and analysis of current applications of law and regulations as they affect children. Policy Clinic students are also able to serve as Educational Representatives for at-risk youth and/or assist CAI’s Homeless Youth Outreach Project. Students must have completed or be enrolled in Child Rights and Remedies. Clinic slots are limited; students must obtain a permission slip from Professor Robert Fellmeth or Elisa Weichel before registering for the course.

Civil Clinic I (Allen Gruber, Theresa J. Player)
LWVL510

3-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure, Evidence , LSII or Practicum

Students interview, counsel and represent clients at Superior Court or in administrative hearings in a wide variety of cases under the supervision of an attorney. Students draft pleadings and correspondence, as well as confer and negotiate with opposing counsel/parties. Weekly group meetings are combined with individual case conferences to provide intensive personal training in litigation techniques, problem solving and case management. Students also learn general civil litigation practice and procedures. Prerequisites: Civil Procedure, Evidence and either Practicum or Lawyering Skills II. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Civil Litigation Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Civil Litigation Concentration

Civil Clinic II (Allen Gruber, Theresa J. Player)
LWVL511

3-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure, Evidence , Lawyering Skills II or Practicum

Students interview, counsel and represent clients at Superior Court or in administrative hearings in a wide variety of cases under the supervision of an attorney. Students draft pleadings and correspondence, as well as confer and negotiate with opposing counsel/parties. Weekly group meetings are combined with individual case conferences to provide intensive personal training in litigation techniques, problem solving and case management. Students also learn general civil litigation practice and procedures. Prerequisites: Civil Procedure, Evidence and either Practicum or Lawyering Skills II. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Civil Litigation Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Civil Litigation Concentration

Civil Procedure II (Staff)
LWAA511

3 credit(s)

Civil Procedure is the study of procedural rules governing civil actions in state and federal courts. The topics studied throughout the year include selection of the proper court and place for litigation, jurisdiction over the parties, joinder of parties and claims, contents of pleadings, discovery, pre-trial motions, conduct of trials, and conflicts between state and federal judicial systems.

Civil Rights Law & History (Gail Heriot)
LWPP519

3 credit(s)

This course will explore the history of civil rights from the 19th century to the present, particularly the legal history. It will ask, for example, what the term “civil rights” meant to the 19th century thinkers, what it meant in the 20th century and what it means today. The Reconstruction amendments to the Constitution will be discussed in depth as well as legislation like the New York Married Women’s Property Act of 1848, the Mississippi Black Code, the Reconstruction civil rights acts, The Civil Rights Act of 1957, The Civil Rights Act of 1964, The Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Americans with Disabilities Act and cases interpreting them. Failed efforts-like the proposed Equal Rights Amendment-will also be discussed. Other non-legal historical reading will also be included. This course will feature a final examination.

Complex Litigation (Alan Schulman)
LWLP523

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD)

This course offers in-depth instruction in how class actions and other aggregate party lawsuits are litigated in federal courts, taught by a trial lawyer with more than 30 years experience litigating class actions. The course covers the case law and practice skills involved in litigating cases under Rule 23, with special focus on several important substantive areas of class action practice – consumer, securities fraud, employment discrimination, and mass tort. Prerequisite: Civil Procedure

Constitutional History (Michael B. Rappaport)
LWPP523

2 credit(s)

This is a class in United States constitutional history. The class will focus on two aspects of constitutional history. First, we will study the drafting and ratification of the Constitution and the Civil War Amendments (13th, 14th & 15th Amendments.) Seond, the class will also explore various basic questions of constitutional law, using our previous discussion of the enactment of the Constitution to understand the meanings these provisions might have had when they were enacted. Subjects will vary each time the course is taught, but may include the First Amendment, Judicial Review, the Ninth Amendment, the War Powers of the President and Congress, the legality of the Civil War Amendments, the Privileges and Immunities Clause, the Equal Protection Clause, Segregation and Brown v. Board of Education, and liberty of contract.

Constitutional Law I (Staff)
LWAA515

4 credit(s)

This course provides an introduction to the United States Constitution, stressing the theory and practice of judicial interpretation and review, the separation of federal powers, the relation of the states to the federal government, and specific powers of the federal government. It also provides an introduction to the Bill of Rights and its limitations on the exercise of governmental power, with emphasis on freedom of speech.

Constitutional Law II (Maimon Schwarzschild, Junichi P. Semitsu)
LWPP525

3 credit(s)
Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

This courses covers the Fourteenth Amendment's equal protection and due process clauses. Specific topics include race discrimination (including school desegregation and affirmative action), gender discrimination, discrimination against gays and lesbians, voting rights, privacy (including abortion, sexual freedom, and the right to die), and property. A final exam is required. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I

Contemporary Water Law Issues (John H. Minan)
LWEV510

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG)

This three-hour seminar on contemporary water issues is intended to introduce students to the major legal doctrines and contemporary issues affecting water supply, water quality, and water use. Although the principle focus is on California water law, the role of federal law is also examined. A research paper is required in lieu of an examination. Students are expected to select a topic of interest to them, to develop a focused expertise by writing on that topic, and to present their analysis to the class at the end of the semester. The research paper does not satisfy the “writing course” requirements for a seminar contained in Academic Rule I.A.1. d.(1). Students wishing to preview the substantive materials to the seminar should go to http://www.sandiego.edu/~jminan and click on the water law link.

Contracts (Staff)
LWAA520

4 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Business and Corporate Law (LLMC)

An introduction to legal reasoning and analytical skills through an investigation of how the law enforces agreements. Included are such topics as: the requirements for the formation of a contract; problems of interpretation; damages for breach; the statute of frauds; illegality; and problems which arise during the performance stage of a contract, such as the creation and failure of express and implied conditions, excuse through impossibility or frustration of purpose, and discharge. Article II of the Uniform Commercial Code is introduced and compared with the common law of contracts.

Copyright Law (Abraham Bell)
LWIP525

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property (JD), Intellectual Property (LLMC), Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

This course surveys the law relating to rights in expressive works. We will study what copyright covers – such as books, movies, musical recordings, and software – and distinguish copyright from other forms of intellectual property, such as trademark and patent. We will focus on the exclusive rights granted in copyrightable works, rules governing the transfer of those rights, what acts infringe those rights, what remedies the law provides for infringement, and what limitations the law places on those rights, such as the fair use doctrine. We will discuss some topics of current interest, such as the rules governing the copying and distribution of music over peer-to-peer networks, digital rights management, and open-source software development.

Note: May be applied as part of the six required credits for the Intellectual Property Concentration (JD).

Corporate Counsel Internship (Ryan Harrigan)
LWVL591

1-3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property (JD)

The Corporate Counsel Internship Program consists of a work component and a class component. The Corporate Counsel Internship Program allows students to receive academic credit for working in the legal department of a corporation, company or other business entity. Students may also work in other departments of a corporation as long as they are supervised by a licensed attorney. The goal of the Program is to provide students with the opportunity to observe first-hand the operations of a corporate legal department and to gain an understanding of the legal issues addressed by corporate counsel. The student must not receive monetary compensation or any outside funding for or related to the work and must be supervised by an on-site lawyer. Students can secure their own internship placements or meet with the Internship Director or Career Services for guidance. Placements qualify for the Program only if the organization requires that a student receive academic credit as a condition of the internship. Organizations willing to pay students or to have them work on a volunteer basis do not qualify for the Program. After a placement is found, students must complete an Application Form to have their placement approved for the Program. Employers who participate in the Program must commit to the requirements of the Program. Students work a minimum of 60 hours per unit of credit and may receive 1-3 credits. Students participate in primarily on-line class sessions involving small group discussions, prepare weekly summaries of their work and complete a writing assignment. If you have been accepted into an internship placement and want to apply for the internship course, fill out the Corporate Counsel application. If you have any other questions, email Lizzette Herrera Castellanos or call (619) 260-2342. The internship is graded on a Pass-Fail basis.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your work in this clinic qualifies for the concentration.
Additional Information: Intellectual Property Concentration, Email Law Student Affairs

Corporate Finance (Robert Jafek)
LWBC530

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Business and Corporate Law (JD), Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)
Prerequisite(s): Corporations

This course covers the core concepts of finance as they relate to the study and practice of law. Topics include financial statement analysis, capital budgeting, valuation of stocks and bonds, risk management, portfolio theory, derivatives, and corporate financial management. The course includes quantitative concepts and exercises, and students are required to use a spreadsheet program, such as Microsoft Excel.

Corporate Reorganization (M. Carr Ferguson)
LWTE510

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT), Business and Corporate Law (JD), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

This course considers the tax treatment of corporations and shareholders in corporate acquisitive reorganizations, single corporation reorganizations and corporate divisions, including carryovers. Tax II is recommended but not required. Prerequisite: Tax I and Corporations: Tax II is recommended but not required. This is an advanced tax course with priority enrollment for LLM in Taxation students.

Corporations (Lynne L. Dallas, Christopher T. Wonnell)
LWBC545

4 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Business and Corporate Law (JD), Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

This course examines the structure and the rights and obligations of directors, officers, and shareholders mainly under state corporations law. Other topics include partnerships and limited liability entities. The course covers, among other subjects, the characteristics of the corporation as distinct from other forms of business association, the special problems of the closely-held corporations (a corporation owned by a few persons), the fiduciary obligations of directors and controlling shareholders in closely-held and public corporations, procedures for decision making by directors and shareholders, shareholder voting rights, and certain federal securities law subjects, such as insider trading.

Note: This is a required course for the Business and Corporate Law Concentration (JD) and the LLM in Business & Corporate Law.

Crime: The People, The Process (Laura M. Berend)
LWCR515

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG), Criminal Law (LLMC)

This course offers a unique opportunity to examine the criminal justice system from the perspectives of a law enforcement officer, a prosecutor, a defense lawyer, a judge, a defendant and a homeless person. There is a class component and placement component. In class, you will address the legal, procedural, ethical, social, and cultural issues that arise in the course of your field work. Some Friday afternoon sessions introduce you to the Department of the Public Defender, the courthouse, the jail, and law enforcement use of force training. (See current course syllabus on TWEN.) Your field work consists of assisting the Deputy Public Defender in the Felony Arraignment Department of the Superior Court by interviewing and advising defendants charged with felony offenses on a criminal complaint to prepare them for arraignment and a bail hearing. You will choose one afternoon that you will spend in the arraignment court throughout the semester. You will also participate in interviewing and counseling people who are chronically homeless at dinners offered by the Welcome Door Foundation on several Wednesday evenings. Enrollment is limited to ten. This course is graded on a four-tier pass-fail basis. Criminal law is a pre-requisite. A security clearance by the Department of the Public Defender is required by the beginning of the semester. The State Bar of California requires completion of or enrollment in evidence and civil procedure before a student can be certified to appear in court.

Criminal Clinic I (Jean Ramirez)
LWVL515

4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Litigation (JD), Criminal Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Evidence, Criminal Procedure I, Lawyering Skills II or Practicum
Recommended Class(es): Criminal Procedure II

This is a clinical course that places students with a prosecuting or defending trial agency in the criminal justice system. Criminal Clinic I has a two-hour per week classroom component that provides simulations, lectures and discussions in the most common areas of criminal practice. Prerequisites: Evidence, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure I, and Lawyering Skills II or equivalent experience at the discretion of the instructor. Recommended but not required: Criminal Procedure II. Important Note: Criminal Clinic has a different registration deadline. Please contact Professor Berend for information on deadlines and additional registration materials. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Criminal Litigation Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Criminal Litigation Concentration

Criminal Clinic II (Jean Ramirez)
LWVL516

2-6 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Litigation (JD), Criminal Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Evidence, Criminal Procedure 1, Lawyering Skills II or Practicum
Recommended Class(es): Criminal Procedure II

This is a clinical course that places students with a prosecuting or defending trial agency in the criminal justice system. Criminal Clinic I has a two-hour per week classroom component that provides simulations, lectures and discussions in the most common areas of criminal practice. Prerequisites: Evidence, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure I, and Lawyering Skills II. Recommended but not required: Criminal Procedure II. Important Note: Criminal Clinic has a different registration deadline. Please contact Professor Berend for information on deadlines and additional registration materials. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Criminal Litigation Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Criminal Litigation Concentration

Criminal Law (Staff)
LWAA525

4 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMC)

The purpose of criminal law, the development of the common law of crimes, the elements of the widely recognized criminal offenses, and the changes brought about by major statutes in connection with their effect on the present-day systems of criminal justice in the United States are explored in this course.

Criminal Procedure I (Albert Alschuler, Kevin Cole)
LWCR520

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Litigation (JD), Criminal Law (LLMG)

This course explores constitutional limitations upon the investigation of crime under the fourth, fifth, sixth and fourteenth amendments. Its focus is on the law governing searches, seizures, and police interrogation. Topics include the nature of a fourth amendment search; arrest and investigative detention; warrants and exceptions to the warrant requirement; confessions; and the application of the exclusionary rules. This section will be team-taught by Professors Alschuler and Cole. Professor Alschuler will teach the first eight weeks of the class, and Professor Cole will teach the remainder. Each teacher will write and grade that portion of the final exam relevant to the material he covers, with the exception that questions relating to the scope of the exclusionary rules arise throughout the course and hence may be tested on any part of the exam. Professor Cole will use iClicker technology to provide feedback to students, but performance on the iClicker questions will not be factored into the course grade. iClickers will be provided to students at no cost provided that they are returned in good condition at the end of the course. Note: This is a required course for the Criminal Litigation Concentration (JD).

Note: This is a required course for the Criminal Litigation Concentration (JD).
Additional Information: iClicker

Criminal Procedure II (Hon. Richard Huffman)
LWCR525

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Litigation (JD), Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Criminal Procedure I

In this advanced criminal procedure class, students will continue the study commenced in Criminal Procedure I, focusing on the processing of a criminal defendant through the criminal justice system. The course will address a number of issues regularly presented in criminal cases, including the charging process, the right to a speedy trial, criminal discovery and disclosure, the right to jury trial, the right to effective assistance of counsel, the right to confrontation and the exercise of the privilege against self incrimination at trial. In addition the course will include discussions of the principles of the right against double jeopardy, and post conviction remedies such as direct appeal and petitions for habeas corpus. The purpose of the course is to develop an understanding of the basic structure of the criminal process in a federal system of government as well as the basic principles underlying the constitutional and procedural protections of the criminal justice system.

Note: This is a required course for the Criminal Litigation Concentration (JD).

Cyberspace Law (Jane Henning)
LWIP530

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property (JD), Intellectual Property (LLMC), Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

Cyberspace Law has been characterized as the study of how information is regulated in a world linked by computer networks. The focus on this class will be on jurisdiction, First Amendment, intellectual property, and privacy issues in cyberspace. Although students may have knowledge of these subjects from other courses, there are no prerequisites to this class. There will be a final examination at the end of the course.

Education & Disability Clinic I (Margaret A. Dalton)
LWVL550

2-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

Students receive practical training and experience in client intake, interviewing and counseling, file review and analysis, and legal representation in diverse forums. Some cases proceed to mediation and due process hearings, where students argue the case with support from the supervising attorney. Weekly group meetings are combined with individual case conferences to provide intensive personal training in case management. The classroom component also includes an overview of statutes and cases in this growing area of civil law. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites. Recommended: Special Education and the Law.

Education & Disability Clinic II (Margaret A. Dalton)
LWVL551

1-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

Students receive practical training and experience in client intake, interviewing and counseling, file review and analysis, and legal representation in diverse forums. Some cases proceed to mediation and due process hearings, where students argue the case with support from the supervising attorney. Weekly group meetings are combined with individual case conferences to provide intensive personal training in case management. The classroom component also includes an overview of statutes and cases in this growing area of civil law. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites. Recommended: Special Education and the Law.

Employment Discrimination (Miranda Oshige McGowan)
LWPP535

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), Labor and Employment Law (LLMG)

This general survey course of employment discrimination laws will focus on primarily the federal anti-discrimination laws prohibiting employment discrimination based on race, sex, pregnancy, national origin, age, sexual orientation. (We will also discuss the California Fair Employment and Housing Act's protections when they diverge from federal law. The Americans with Disabilities Act will not be a primary area of study.) This course gives students an opportunity to think about the meaning and practice of discrimination, to analyze various anti-discrimination approaches, and to learn to think creatively and flexibly when working on problems within this complex, evolving field of law. Students will learn to strategize about bringing and defending employment discrimination suits and, perhaps even more importantly, about helping clients develop policies and practices that foster discrimination-free workplaces and resolve workplace issues before they develop into lawsuits.

Employment Law & Technology (Richard A. Paul)
LWPP539

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): Labor and Employment Law (LLMG)

This course will examine the application of traditional doctrines of free expression, privacy, harassment, defamation and related workplace rules to speech articulated in emerging communications technology devices. The course will open with a discussion of the technologies, their typical ownership and function, and of the areas of potential conflict surveyed in my article “Brave New Cyberworld: The Employer’s Legal Guide to the Interactive Internet” (R. Paul and L. Chung, 2008). The first quarter of the course will then review in some detail the bases and reaches of employer and employee rights and duties in the clash between employer interests in efficiency and information security with employee rights of speech, privacy and the like. The second quarter of the course will examine the application of these ideas in different employment environments, starting with the information-sensitive (public employment, higher education workplaces and other workplaces in which information flow is a critical component of the work done), and then in the ordinary private sector environment. The final quarter of the course will look at specific technology problems, e.g., monitoring employee computers, blackberry’s, SNS’s, text messaging, blogspeak, and the like. The final part of the course will be reserved for presentation and discussion of student papers on topics within the general course parameters.

Energy Law and Policy Clinic (Michael Reed)
LWVL518

1-3 credit(s)
Prerequisite(s): Energy Law

The Energy Law and Policy Clinic provides students an opportunity to conduct legal and policy research in cooperation with a related agency, such as the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) and the California Air Resources board. Agency staff, EPIC staff, and students work together to select one or more energy-or-climate change-related legal or policy research topics. Under the supervision of a practicing attorney and EPIC staff, students conduct a semester-long research project on the selected topic(s). Students will present results to the agency staff at the end of the semester. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. Prerequisite: Energy Law

Entertainment, Sports and Intellectual Property Internship Program (Lizzette Herrera Castellanos)
LWVL592

1 - 3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property (JD)

The Entertainment, Sports and Intellectual Property Internship Program consists of a work component and a class component and allows students to earn academic credit for working in a law department of an entertainment or sports industry company, talent guild or trade association, or in the intellectual property law department of a company or trade association. Students work a minimum of 60 hours per unit of credit and may receive 1-3 credits. Students participate in primarily online class sessions involving small group discussions, prepare weekly summaries of their work and complete a writing assignment. If you have been accepted into an internship placement and want to apply for the internship course, fill out the ESIP application below. The Internship is graded on a Pass-Fail basis. If you have any other questions, email Lizzette Herrera Castellanos or call (619) 260-2342.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your work in this clinic qualifies for the concentration.
Additional Information: ESIP Application, Intellectual Property Concentration

Entrepreneurship Clinic I (Donna Matias)
LWVL520

2-3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

Through hands-on opportunities, students in the Entrepreneurship Clinic provide pro bono legal services to low- and moderate-income entrepreneurs who want to start or expand their small businesses. The Entrepreneurship Clinic does not engage in litigation-related services; instead, it focuses on advising clients on legal matters relating to starting their business and assisting in drafting and filing necessary documents. Such work includes: determining the appropriate choice of business entity, assistance in obtaining necessary permits and licenses, advising on employment and independent contractor issues, drafting and reviewing commercial contracts and leases, and assisting with the establishment of tax-exempt organizations. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

Entrepreneurship Clinic II (Donna Matias)
LWVL521

2-3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

Through hands-on opportunities, students in the Entrepreneurship Clinic provide pro bono legal services to low- and moderate-income entrepreneurs who want to start or expand their small businesses. The Entrepreneurship Clinic does not engage in litigation-related services; instead, it focuses on advising clients on legal matters relating to starting their business and assisting in drafting and filing necessary documents. Such work includes: determining the appropriate choice of business entity, assistance in obtaining necessary permits and licenses, advising on employment and independent contractor issues, drafting and reviewing commercial contracts and leases, and assisting with the establishment of tax-exempt organizations. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

Environmental Clinic I (Richard J. Wharton)
LWVL525

2-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Environmental Law or concurrently

This is a clinical course for students who wish to develop litigation skills in the context of environmental law. All work is performed under the direct supervision of the director of the Environmental Law Clinic. This clinic focuses on impact litigation. There is a two-hour per week classroom component, as well as a regular meeting with the director of the Environmental Law Clinic. Prerequisite: Environmental Law, which may be taken concurrently. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Environmental Clinic II (Richard J. Wharton)
LWVL526

1-5 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Environmental Law

This is a clinical course for students who wish to develop litigation skills in the context of environmental law. All work is performed under the direct supervision of the director of the Environmental Law Clinic. This clinic focuses on impact litigation. There is a two-hour per week classroom component, as well as a regular meeting with the director of the Environmental Law Clinic. Prerequisite: Environmental Law, which may be taken concurrently. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Environmental Law Seminar (Kelly Richardson, Ryan R. Waterman)
LWEV523

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG)

This course will cover major federal legislative initiatives in the environmental field, including the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (“Superfund”). We will analyze the constitutional underpinnings of these statutes and explore related issues including citizen suit provisions and the roles and relationships of federal, state, and local governments in the enactment and enforcement of environmental legislation. The course touches briefly on environmental rulemaking and multi-venue litigation addressing the relationship between federal statutes and state common law, as well as environmental insurance issues. No prerequisites necessary, final examination only. Course will be taught on select Saturdays to be announced at first class meeting.

Estate Planning (Dennis Lilly)
LWTE520

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

The study of estate planning brings together in a practical, planning-oriented approach the knowledge gained from many courses to assist prospective lawyers in advising their clients how to arrange the most effective disposition of their capital and income. The income taxation of trusts and estates, the revocable trust, and the marital deduction are reviewed in detail. Differences between planning with separate property and community property are considered. This course is tax intensive and intended for students with a strong interest in tax law. Prerequisites: Tax I (Basic Federal Tax), Federal Estate and Gift Taxation, and T&E: Wills & Trusts. This is an advanced tax course with priority enrollment for LLM in Taxation students.

Ethics, Law & Int'l Affairs (Horacio Spector)
LWJT515

1 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI), International Law (LLMC)

Contemporary public policy and legal debates in both the domestic and international arenas involve an intricate network of moral, political, and legal considerations. The seminar’s ambitious goal is to throw light on the relations among these three fundamental realms: ethics, politics, and law. After a general introduction, we will proceed to discuss the following topics: conceptions of liberty and equality, democracy and public deliberation, human rights, and the rule of law. Our attention will be focused on issues that cross national boundaries: Is democracy more important than the rule of law? Does economic equality threaten liberty? Are welfare rights compatible with civil liberties in illiberal democracies? What’s the place of choice in social welfare regimes? Is well being synonymous with income? In the last part of the seminar, we will deal with complex global issues: wars and military interventions, terrorism, and global justice. Can military force be used to protect human rights? Should rich nations transfer money to poor countries? Should pharmaceutical patents be enforced in the undeveloped world? Is there a global community? Students will be required to write a short paper (10-12 pages).

Evidence (Michael Devitt)
LWLP529

4 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD), Criminal Law (LLMC)

The rules of evidence in judicial tribunals, focusing on the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Evidence Code are addressed in this course. Also covered are issues relating to: (1) judicial control and administration - functions of judge and jury, judicial notice, burden of proof presumptions, problems of relevancy, circumstantial evidence, and unfair prejudice; and (2) witnesses - competency, privileges, principles of examination and cross-examination, impeachment and support, expert and lay opinion testimony. The hearsay rule and its exceptions, rules relating to writings, real and scientific evidence are also examined.

Note: This is a required course for the Civil Litigation (JD) and Criminal Litigation (JD) concentrations.

Evidence (Donald A. Dripps)
LWLP529

4 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD), Criminal Law (LLMC)

The rules of evidence in judicial tribunals, focusing on the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Evidence Code are addressed in this course. Also covered are issues relating to: (1) judicial control and administration - functions of judge and jury, judicial notice, burden of proof presumptions, problems of relevancy, circumstantial evidence, and unfair prejudice; and (2) witnesses - competency, privileges, principles of examination and cross-examination, impeachment and support, expert and lay opinion testimony. The hearsay rule and its exceptions, rules relating to writings, real and scientific evidence are also examined.

Note: This is a required course for the Civil Litigation (JD) and Criminal Litigation (JD) concentrations.

Evidence Advocacy Lab (Laura M. Berend)
LWLP530

1 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG), Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Evidence

This course is designed to familiarize students with the practical application of evidentiary points addressed in the traditional evidence course. Students focus on one or two evidentiary issues each week using a problem format. Each area of evidence is taught through performance. Each student is assigned as a proponent, opponent, witness and judge and is responsible for performing that role in class each week, and for submitting a short memo identifying the evidentiary issue and presenting the best approach to offering or opposing the evidence in court. The roles rotate each week. There is a new problem assigned each week. By the end of the semester, each student should be comfortably able to determine what it is he or she wished to accomplish in a courtroom with respect to specific evidentiary questions, and be able to structure the most logical, persuasive and trouble-free means to that end. Evidence is a prerequisite. Enrollment is limited to 8 students. The course is graded on a 4-tier Pass/Fail basis.

FDA Law & Policy Seminar (Aimee Mackay)
LWPP544

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing

The US Food and Drug Administration is responsible for regulating $1 trillion worth of consumer goods, comprising nearly 25% of consumer expenditures. FDA's regulatory jurisdiction includes food, nutritional supplements, drugs, medical devices, and biologics such as vaccines and cell therapies. The agency's broad authority is guided by twin aims identified in its mission statement: (1) to protect the public health by ensuring that food and medical products are safe and effective, and (2) to advance the public health by speeding product innovations. Exploring the inevitable tension between these twin aims will be the mission of this course. Topics for this course will include: regulation and labeling of food products; regulation of dietary supplements and their structure/function and disease claims; human drug and medical device testing, approval, and marketing; and regulation of human biologics. We will place special emphasis on examining how FDA copes with emerging technologies such as neutraceuticals (food products such as pomegranate juice and "probiotic" yogurt), aquaceuticals ("functional" water and juices), genetically engineered crops, fish and animals, and human tissue transplants, gene therapy, assisted reproduction, stem cells and cloning. We will conclude with a look at FDA's enforcement powers and the limits of private citizen civil suits pursuant to FDA regulations.

Federal Courts (Steven D. Smith)
LWPP545

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD), Criminal Law (LLMG)

This course is best described as advanced constitutional law focusing on the power of the federal courts, particularly with respect to the states and the other branches of the federal government. It is essential for anyone planning to clerk for a federal judge, or to perform public interest work in a variety of areas involving constitutional claims or governmental litigants. In practical terms, the materials concern who may bring suit in federal court, against whom, and under what circumstances. Specific topics include interpretation of Article III, justiciability (including standing and the "political question" doctrine), congressional power over the jurisdiction of the federal courts (including the extent to which civil rights suits and "enemy combatants" may be excluded from federal court), the immunities from suit enjoyed by state governments and public officials (such as police officers), and habeas corpus. Those interested may peruse Hart & Wechsler's The Federal Courts and the Federal System for a further indication of course content. Prior completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, Constitutional Law II is very strongly advised. The course materials assume a working knowledge of due process, equal protection, and state actor doctrine.

Note: This course may be applied as one of the three required courses for the Public Interest Law Concentration (JD).

Federal Crimes (Judge William V. Gallo)
LWCR535

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG), Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Litigation (JD)

This course will focus on the unique characteristics of Federal Criminal law. Attention will be paid to the jurisdiction of the Federal Government over criminal law as well as the individual statutes that are employed by Federal prosecutors in prosecuting a wide range of offenses. Federal prosecutions will be considered from the investigative stage, including the use of the grand jury, through the charging, plea-bargaining, trial, sentencing and appellate stages. Special consideration will be given to the increasing role of the Federal Government in prosecuting state and local corruption. This course will be especially beneficial for those students considering a career in criminal law as either prosecutors or criminal defense lawyers.

Note: Students may only elect this course or White Collar Crime to count toward the Criminal Litigation Concentration (JD).

Federal Tax Clinic (Dale Carpenter)
LWVL555

4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)
Prerequisite(s): Tax I

This is a hands-on clinical course for students who wish to develop tax controversy skills. Students working under the supervision of the Tax Clinic supervising attorney will represent low income taxpayers in resolving their tax disputes with the IRS. Students will learn client interviewing skills, how to interact with IRS personnel, and how to effectively resolve a client’s federal tax dispute. Students must also be available to participate in Tax Clinic Outreach presentations at various community locations and times. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. Prerequisite: Tax I.

Fundamentals of Bar Exam Writing (Linda McCloud, Judson E. Campbell, Erica Berent)
LWGC520

1 credit(s)

The course covers the fundamentals of bar exam essay writing and performance test writing. The first class is an introduction to bar exam components and topics. The next several classes focus on the details of essay exam writing and performance test drafting. Students will receive substantial feedback on their written work, and participate in small group sessions, self and peer review, and professor-student conferencing. Grading is on the H/P/LP/F scale. Students may be withdrawn from the course and/or given a failing grade for missing more than one class, failing to turn in any written assignments on time, or failing to complete any practice examination. Enrollment is by application only through the Office of JD Student Affairs. 3L & 4E students only.


Additional Information: Application (PDF)

High Tech Start Ups (Thomas A. Smith)
LWBC587

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB), Intellectual Property (LLMC), Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), Intellectual Property (JD), Business and Corporate Law (JD)

This course covers the legal principles and some of the tax law applicable to a series of interesting, complex, and current entrepreneurial transactions, utilizing venture capital or private equity financing. The course will cover, time permitting, as many as possible of the following: (1) a new business start up (with emphasis on high technology sectors); (2) a growth equity investment in an existing business enterprise; (3) a leveraged buyout of a private or a public company (including a going-private transaction); (4) use of a flow-through tax entity such as an S corporation, a partnership, or an LLC, for a variety of venture capital or private equity financed transactions; (5) devising an exit scenario for the successful venture capital or private equity financed enterprise (such as IPO, SEC rule 144 sales, or sale of the company); and (6) forming a new venture capital, LBO, or private equity fund. Substantive subjects touched upon include federal income tax, securities regulation, corporate law, partnership law, LLC law, bankruptcy law, fraudulent conveyance law, and other legal doctrines and accounting rules and practical structuring issue relevant to entrepreneurial transactions (including use of common and preferred stocks, convertible debentures and convertible preferred, warrants, and options). The course reviews these in a transactional context and may also consider to some extent their policy underpinnings and likely future evolution. Corporations is a prerequisite. Introductory Income Tax is recommended, and Taxation of Corporations is desirable, as are Securities Law, and Corporate Finance, and related courses.

Note: There are limitations on Intellectual Property (JD) concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Intellectual Property Concentration

Immigration Clinic I (Jan Joseph Bejar)
LWVL530

2-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), LLM in International Law (LLMI)

Students gain practical experience through interviewing, counseling, and representing clients with immigration-related problems. Students complete forms and draft documents on behalf of clients. Students also attend and/or participate at hearings at Immigration Court. Weekly meetings are held with the clinic supervisor to discuss immigration law, practical application and casework. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No Prerequisites.

Immigration Clinic II (Jan Joseph Bejar)
LWVL531

2-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), LLM in International Law (LLMI)
Prerequisite(s): Immigration Clinic I

Students gain practical experience through interviewing, counseling, and representing clients with immigration-related problems. Students complete forms and draft documents on behalf of clients. Students also attend and/or participate at hearings at Immigration Court. Weekly meetings are held with the clinic supervisor to discuss immigration law, practical application and casework. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Income Tax of Trusts & Estates (Ann Harris)
LWTE536

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

The federal income taxation of trusts, estates, and their beneficiaries; distributable net income; distribution deductions for simple and complex trusts and estates; grantor trusts; income in respect of a decedent; and throwback rules. Prerequisites: Both Tax I and T&E: Wills & Trusts. This is an advanced tax course with priority enrollment for LLM in Taxation students.

International Arbitration (Richard W. Page)
LWIC530

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI), International Law (JD), International Law (LLMC)

This is an introduction to arbitration in general and international arbitration in particular. The course will be taught from the perspective of a lawyer with international clients who practices (or hopes to practice) in California. That lawyer will need to know about: (1) the advantages and disadvantages of arbitration, (2) the legal framework for domestic and international arbitration, (3) the drafting and enforceability of the agreement to arbitrate, (4) choice of administering institution and the arbitration rules, (5) selection of the arbitration panel, (6) conduct of the arbitration hearing, and (7) enforceability of the final arbitration award. The course materials will be a recent casebook on "International Commercial Arbitration" and a statutory supplement. The final exam will be held during the last class meeting. Students are graded by the standard letter grading system.

International Energy Regulation (Nilmini Silva-Send)
LWIC542

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG)

This 3 credit course on a contemporary global topic will introduce students to international legal principles (sovereignty, territoriality, no harm, compensation for expropriation, liability etc) and relevant treaties, especially the ECT, that govern the interaction between states, agreements/contracts and negotiations between states (public) and multinationals (private), and other legal issues facing the exploration, supply of and investment in energy resources. It will examine the role of major international organizations in the energy sector, such as OPEC, the OECD, the IEA, the UN, the EU as well as the role of NGOs. International energy disputes can be investment disputes most often resolved by arbitration as the preferred mode with ICSID the largest forum of choice. International energy disputes can also be environmental and human rights disputes, litigated in international courts and national courts. While using oil, natural gas and nuclear power as examples for the course, we will look toward the future and evaluate the international legal and policy issues facing the development and expansion of renewable energy, such as biofuels and solar power. This course will be examined by a research paper in place of a final examination. Successful completion of the paper will fulfill the writing requirements of the school of law.

International Intellectual Property (Lisa P. Ramsey)
LWIP545

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property (LLMC), LLM in International Law (LLMI), International Law (JD), Intellectual Property (JD), Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

This course examines international protection of intellectual property. We will discuss international treaties, trade agreements, and dispute resolution systems relating to trademarks, patents, copyrights, and related rights. The course will also cover acquisition and enforcement of intellectual property rights in foreign markets. Prerequisites: None

International Negotiation (Charles B. Wiggins)
LWIC548

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI), International Law (LLMC)

The course will include specific materials and skill-building exercises on cross-cultural aspects of the bargaining process. Participants will include lawyers from other nations who are enrolled in USD's LLMC program, and upper class American JD students. Four-tier Pass/Fail grading.

International Organizations (Jorge A. Vargas)
LWIC552

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): International Law (LLMC), LLM in International Law (LLMI), International Law (JD)

The course is designed to analyze some of the major international environmental problems of interest to the United States. A wide variety of current and traditional transborder legal questions regarding international rivers, marine and air pollution, toxic waste and hazardous materials, endangered species, and nuclear radiation are discussed. Special emphasis is given to contemporary legal questions, including a special segment devoted to analyzing the bilateral environmental issues with Canada and Mexico. A research paper is required.

International Sales (William H. Lawrence)
LWIC555

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), LLM in International Law (LLMI), International Law (JD), Business and Corporate Law (JD), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

This course focuses on the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods (CISG), with comparisons to domestic law (the UCC in particular). Considerable time is devoted to the application of the CISG to problems that typically arise in international sales transactions. The course does not include an exam. Students instead prepare written memos that reflect the type of assignments they can expect in practice with a law firm.

Interviewing & Counseling (Theresa J. Player)
LWLP535

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG)

This course provides advanced training in the skills of client interviewing and counseling. The first part of the course is devoted to learning the specific micro-skills that make up effective interviewing through readings, demonstrations and role-plays. The second- part focuses on the counseling dimension of lawyer-client relationships. In addition to classroom preparation and activities, students will interview actual clients in various locales, including the USD Legal Clinic, the San Diego County Law Library Clinic, and several senior citizen centers. Ethical issues unique to interviewing and counseling are emphasized. Lawyering Skills II or Practicum is highly recommended, but not required. Enrollment is limited; attendance at first class meeting is mandatory. The course is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Intro to US Law (Michael Devitt)
LWGC530

2 credit(s)

Introduction to United States Law is a required course for Master of Comparative Law students. No other students may enroll. This course comparatively introduces distinctly American approaches to law, lawyering and legal processes. Special emphasis is placed on the common law tradition.

Note: This course is for LLMC students only.

Judicial Internship (Paul Horton)
LWVL598

1 - 6 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)

The Judicial Internship Program allows students to receive academic credit for work in a judge's chambers in San Diego. Students must work 60 hours per unit of credit. In addition to the work component of the Program, students enrolled in the program will have regular contact with the Program's instructor, Professor Horton, who will meet with students individually, assign various written projects (such as a journal and a final paper), and review samples of the student's written work from the internship. The program is limited to a total of 20 students per semester or summer term. Preference is given to students who are in, or who are about to enter, their final law school year. Professor Horton has a manual that explains the judicial internship process; interested students should be sure to pick up a copy of the manual. Students can secure their own internship position or can meet with Professor Horton for guidance in securing a placement. The internship is graded on a Pass-Fail basis.

Note: Students must receive approval from Professor Horton to register for this program. There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the concentration web pages for more information.
Additional Information: Civil Litigation Concentration, Criminal Litigation Concentration

Labor Law (David P. Wolds)
LWLP545

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Labor and Employment Law (LLMG)

This course offers an introduction to federal labor laws that effect collective bargaining relationships, negotiated agreements, National Labor Relations Board rules and procedures, federal court jurisdiction, labor arbitration, and the rights of individual union members. This course will not consider other employment laws, employment litigation, or alternative dispute resolution procedures that are covered in other classes offered by the School of Law or the employee benefits class offered by the Graduate Tax Institute. This class requires no prerequisite course work.

Land Use Clinic I (Susan Quinn)
LWVL535

2-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG)

The Land Use Clinic provides students with the opportunity to become involved in land use and land development issues. Students are placed with government agencies, elected officials or attorneys in private practice. Most placements are with the City of San Diego and include the City Attorney’s Office, the Mayor’s Office, and City Council offices. Students work under the supervision of an attorney. Student work usually focuses on local issues including the procedures for siting cell phone towers, the regulation of adult entertainment and cardrooms, reviewing environmental documents, attending community meetings and issues involving affordable housing. The weekly two-hour classroom component covers the basic statutory and regulatory framework of land use law and procedures. In addition to the class students are required to attend one local community planning group meeting. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

Land Use Clinic II (Susan Quinn)
LWVL536

2-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG)

The Land Use Clinic provides students with the opportunity to become involved in land use and land development issues. Students are placed with government agencies, elected officials or attorneys in private practice. Most placements are with the City of San Diego and include the City Attorney’s Office, the Mayor’s Office, and City Council offices. Students work under the supervision of an attorney. Student work usually focuses on local issues including the procedures for siting cell phone towers, the regulation of adult entertainment and cardrooms, reviewing environmental documents, attending community meetings and issues involving affordable housing. The weekly two-hour classroom component covers the basic statutory and regulatory framework of land use law and procedures. In addition to the class students are required to attend one local community planning group meeting. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

Landlord Tenant Clinic I (Allen Gruber)
LWVL537

2-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

Students interview, counsel, and represent clients in Superior Court unlawful detainer trials, in administrative hearings involving federally subsidized Section 8 termination proceedings, in Superior Court involving Writs of Administrative Mandamus, and in the Appellate Department of the Superior Court and the Fourth District Court of Appeal involving appeals from the various trial court proceedings. An adjunct professor/attorney supervises students, who draft pleadings and correspondence, conduct discovery, and confer and negotiate with opposing counsel/parties. Weekly group meetings are combined with individual case conferences to provide intensive personal training in litigation techniques, problem solving, and case management. Students also learn general civil litigation practice and procedures. Prerequisites: Civil Procedure and Evidence. Preference will be given to those applicants who have taken Practicum or Lawyering Skills II, and who are willing to take three units. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Landlord Tenant Clinic II (Allen Gruber)
LWVL537

3-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

Students interview, counsel, and represent clients in Superior Court unlawful detainer trials, in administrative hearings involving federally subsidized Section 8 termination proceedings, in Superior Court involving Writs of Administrative Mandamus, and in the Appellate Department of the Superior Court and the Fourth District Court of Appeal involving appeals from the various trial court proceedings. An adjunct professor/attorney supervises students, who draft pleadings and correspondence, conduct discovery, and confer and negotiate with opposing counsel/parties. Weekly group meetings are combined with individual case conferences to provide intensive personal training in litigation techniques, problem solving, and case management. Students also learn general civil litigation practice and procedures. Prerequisites: Civil Procedure and Evidence. Preference will be given to those applicants who have taken Practicum or Lawyering Skills II, and who are willing to take three units. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Latin American Law & Institutions (Horacio Spector)
LWIC559

1 credit(s)
Concentration(s): International Law (JD), LLM in International Law (LLMI), International Law (LLMC)

There is a great distance between current legal institutions in Latin America and those that were originally designed and established Latin American constitutions drew a lot on the U.S. Bill of Rights and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man. In fact, they instituted representative democracy, the inviolability of individual rights, and untrammeled economic freedom. During the twentieth century Latin American countries suffered from great political and legal instability, civil wars, massive human rights violations, economic crises, and a great number of experiments in land reform, emergency powers, financial confiscations, and constitutional engineering. All these phenomena have impinged on Latin American institutions, legal culture, and social norms, thus creating what may be the most impressive natural socio-legal laboratory on earth. The course will be theoretically minded. It will discuss selected problems in Latin American law and institutions in the light of law and economics, law and development, and social and political philosophy. No prior knowledge about Latin American politics or law will be needed. The lessons to be drawn can be generalized to illuminate current legal and social problems in other developing countries and elsewhere. They can also serve to assess various theoretical paradigms.

Law & Economics (Christopher T. Wonnell)
LWPP550

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing

This course introduces the student to the burgeoning field of legal thought on the intersection of law and economics. It analyzes a wide variety of legal institutions, including property, contract, tort, criminal law, corporate law, and antitrust, from the perspective of the incentive structures that are created by these institutions. In that sense, economic analysis is a value-neutral scientific exploration of cause and effect. However, we will also use economics to ask important normative questions about the legal fields we study. Do the legal rules in these areas result in activity that is privately profitable but socially wasteful? Would alternative legal rules more efficiently coordinate private activity in the service of the public good? There are no prerequisites for this course. All students enrolled in this class must take the final exam. Students can also complete a paper (along with taking the final exam) that will fulfill the written work requirement.

Law & Politics of Educ Policy Development (Frank R. Kemerer)
LWPP556

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Education Law

Educational policy development at the local and state level is a complex and convoluted process. To give a limited number of law students and graduate education students an inside look on how educational policy is formulated, the School of Law and the School of Leadership and Education Studies are co-sponsoring this seminar under the auspices of the Center for Education Policy and Law (CEPAL). The course encompasses readings, cases, and deliberations with the instructors and guest presenters, as well as interaction in the Bay Area and Sacramento with researchers, interest groups and labor unions, advocacy-based think-tanks, and key elected and appointed governmental officials. The seminar this semester will focus on three key areas of law and policy: (1) increasing use of technology on and off campus through electronic communication devices and on-line learning; (2) school and community college accountability and finance reform; (3) teacher tenure, assessment, and layoff. Two field trips will be conducted during the semester. The one-day Bay Area field trip will include discussions with educational policy researchers and commentators at the Stanford School of Education and Stanford Law School. The class also will meet with the general counsel and key leaders of the California Teachers Association in Burlingame. The one-day Sacramento field trip will feature discussions with elected and appointment policymakers in the Governor’s office, state legislature, and education agencies. Student travel will be funded through CEPAL. A research paper on a topic of the student’s choice related to educational policy development and a class presentation based on the paper are required. This is a paper course that will fulfill the written work requirement. Co-teaching the course will be Scott Himelstein, former Acting and Deputy Secretary of Education for the State of California. Class sessions will be held on eight selected Thursday evenings to be announced at the first class meeting. Of the eight sessions, three will be devoted to student presentations and one to a debriefing following the field trips. Note: Enrollment is limited initially to six law students. Prerequisite: LWFC 530 Education Law. If spaces are available when the first class is held, additional law students will be admitted from the waitlist. Those who are familiar with education law through other courses and/or experiences may enroll with instructor permission once all law students meeting the preequisite have had an opportunity to enroll.

Law of American Democracy (Carl A. Auerbach)
LWPP560

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)

The seminar will explore the ways in which our Constitution and legislation implement the principle that democratic government is based on the consent of the governed. It will begin by examining democratic structures that differ from our own. It will then consider our federalism and the bicameral structure of our federal government; our system of legislative representation; the electoral college and selection of the President (including the election of 2000); the role and regulation of political parties and our two-party system; campaign finance (money and politics); proposals for electoral reform, including term-limits; the function of judicial review in a democracy, including judicial selection; and direct democracy at the local level, particularly in California. This class will fulfill the written work requirement.

Law of Love (Shaun P. Martin)
LWGC555

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing

Why can (or can't) you marry your cousin? Or a member of your same gender? Why can't you have two wives? Or three husbands? What about intimate relations with your brother? Okay? What about a 14-year old? Or a chicken? Can you be sued, or jailed, if you fornicate? Or commit adultery? What are the legitimate boundaries of the sex industry? Or of a first date? Can you be held liable if you say you're sterile but aren't? Or say you're disease-free? Or that you're going to marry someone just so they'll sleep with you? Who gets the ring when an engagement breaks off? Is it a tort if you're injured during sex? In short, how does the law regulate intimate relations? This class addresses the many forms of this issue. This is a paper course that will fulfill the written work requirement.

Law of the Sea (Jorge A. Vargas)
LWIC560

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): International Law (LLMC), LLM in International Law (LLMI), Public Interest Law (JD), International Law (JD), Environmental and Energy Law (LLMG)

Instruction concentrates on the origins and development of the legal regime applicable to the uses and resources of the oceans. Special consideration is given to the formulation and codification process of this dynamic branch of public international law, in particular the work and final outcome of the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea. Topics for analysis also will include fishing activities, maritime delimitation, pollution, marine scientific research, and U.S. policy regarding law of the sea matters. A research paper will be required.

Lawyering Skills I (Staff)
LWAA545

1 credit(s)

This course is offered in small sections with very low student-faculty ratios. Faculty carefully review each student's writing assignments and students are provided many opportunities to revise their work. Students do their research assignments at the Law School's state-of-the-art Legal Research Center. In addition, each student is trained on both the Westlaw and Lexis computer-assisted legal research systems. Students are also carefully trained in oral advocacy skills. After writing an appellate brief, each student delivers an oral argument based on the brief, first for the instructor and then before a panel of attorneys.

Lawyering Skills II (Allen C. Snyder)
LWLP550

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD), Criminal Litigation (JD)

Students receive training in a variety of legal skills, including interviewing, counseling, negotiating, drafting memos, discovery, and trial advocacy. The course is specifically designed to follow-up on and expand the skills introduced to the student in Lawyering Skills I. The course methodology combines lectures, demonstrations and individual student performances in small groups with extensive critique and feedback by small group instructors who are experienced practitioners. The course culminates in a mock trial. Four-tier Pass/Fail grading.

Note: Students may only elect this course or Practicum--Civil to count toward the Civil Litigation Concentration (JD).

Lawyering Skills LLMC (Gail Greene)
LWGC560

1 credit(s)

This course is offered in small sections with very low student-faculty ratios. Faculty carefully review each student's writing assignments and students are provided many opportunities to revise their work. Students do their research assignments at the Law School's state-of-the-art Legal Research Center. This course is open to students in the LLM in Comparative Law for Foreign Lawyers program.

Legal Drafting (Elaine Edelman)
LWGC563

2 credit(s)

Transactional drafting is a skill used in most areas of law. It refers to the process of composing documents to formalize agreements and settlements between parties. This course will train students to be comfortable with the drafting process, which includes expressing agreements and settlements in language that will benefit clients, and composing documents that contain this language in a form that will maximize favorable interpretation in court. The course emphasizes both cooperative and individual drafting work. Each week in class, students will learn about selected components of the process, draft a document or exercise requiring the use of that component, and receive feedback on that day’s drafting activity. Students will have weekly individual homework assignments that reinforce that week’s skill. One or more attorneys whose practices include drafting work will appear in class to give students practical feedback on their work. Grades will be based on individual weekly written homework assignments and an end-of-semester individual drafting project, and are subject to the upper class curve requirements.

Mediation Internship (Agustin Lopez)
LWVL595

1 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

The semester Mediation Skills course and the Mediation Internship are separate, though linked, course offerings. Upon completion of the skills course, students will be eligible to participate in a program allowing them to mediate actual cases filed with the San Diego County Small Claims Court. Students must do the skills training sessions and the mediation internship in the same semester. The student interns will meet with the internship supervisor in two group sessions during the semester and on bi-weekly TWEN sessions.

Mediation Skills (Charles B. Wiggins)
LWLP556

1 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

Mediation is a process by which a trained and impartial third party helps others resolve a dispute. Lawyers use mediation extensively, both as advocates and as neutrals. This course consists of a twenty-four hour basic mediation sills training. Participants will learn to mediate a variety of disputes, using the methodology developed by San Diego's National Conflict Resolution Center. They will receive a certificate of participation upon their successful completion of the training. Participants must commit to attending each of the training sessions as a condition of enrollment. Enrollment is limited to 24 participants. The course is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. Completion of Mediation Skills is a prerequisite for enrollment in the Mediation Internship. The semester Mediation Skills course and the Mediation Internship are separate, though linked, course offerings. Upon completion of the skills course, students will be eligible to participate in a program allowing them to mediate actual cases filed with the San Diego County Small Claims Court. Students must do the skills training sessions and the mediation internship in the same semester. To learn more please go to Mediation Internship course description.

Mergers and Acquisitions (Thomas A. Smith)
LWBC570

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), Business and Corporate Law (JD), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

This course will examine selected economic, corporate law, and securities law aspects of the acquisition of businesses. Topics covered will include some basic (and necessary) corporate finance theory (such as valuation, efficient capital markets, event studies and option pricing theory); empirical evidence on the social costs and benefits of acquisition activity; the structuring of friendly and hostile acquisitions; the corporate law of takeover defenses; and securities law regulation of acquisition transactions. Some accounting and tax law topics may be touched upon, but they will not be a major focus of the course. Some effort will be made to examine drafting and negotiations aspects of M&A transactions. Corporations is a prerequisite. Students with substantial background in related areas may take Corporations concurrently, with permission. There will be a final exam in the class.

Native American Law (James R. McCurdy)
LWPP567

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)

A comprehensive survey considering the unique body of law affecting Native Americans, American Indian property interests, and those doing business in Indian country. Topics covered include the competing claims to jurisdiction by state, federal, and tribal governments, including PL 280 jurisdiction and taxation; treaties and the abrogation thereof; the Indian Civil Rights Act; the Indian Child Welfare Act; Indian Gaming Regulatory Act; probate matters; water rights; and natural resources and environmental law.

Negotiation (Gregg Relyea)
LWLP560

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD)

Effective negotiation skills are essential to the successful practice of law. Most legal disputes are resolved through direct negotiation. This course will teach students effective communication techniques and negotiation strategies in a workshop style setting. The course will introduce students to different types of bargaining, different approaches to bargaining, specialized communication techniques used by effective negotiators, and techniques for overcoming negotiating impasses. Negotiation practices will be taught using both lecture and experiential methods (interactive exercise, role play exercises). This course will be practical in its orientation, with an emphasis on prevailing negotiation techniques and strategies customarily used by practicing lawyers. Due to the participatory nature of the course, enrollment will be limited. Grades will be based on a written final examination, homework assignments, and class participation. The course is graded on a 4-tier Pass/Fail basis. Note: Students may only elect this course or Alternative Dispute Resolution to count towards the Civil Litigation Concentration (JD).

Note: Students may only elect this course or Alternative Dispute Resolution to count towards the Civil Litigation Concentration (JD).

Patent Law Policy (Ted Sichelman)
LWIP564

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property (LLMC), Intellectual Property (JD), Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

This seminar will examine contemporary policy issues in patent law, using doctrinal, economic, and historical approaches. Readings will be drawn from a variety of law review articles and books. Grades will be based on a final paper. Students must either (1) have taken at least one of the following courses: Intellectual Property Survey, Patent Law, or Biotech Patent Law; or (2) must have taken and passed the USPTO patent bar examination.

Patent Prosecution (Sam K. Tahmassebi)
LWIP571

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property (LLMC), Intellectual Property (JD), Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): See course description

This course examines the practical aspects of patent practice. Topics covered include a detailed review of patent prosecution, procedures before the US Patent & Trademark Office, and the requirements of Title 37 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In addition, the course discusses issues related to inventor interview techniques, development of an IP strategy for a client, and licensing issues. Ethical issues related to inequitable conduct, duty of candor, and proper representation of clients are addressed. Students will prepare a mock patent application for a simple invention, examine it, and respond to mock PTO Office Actions. Prerequisite: Intellectual Property Survey, or Patent Law. No technical background is required. Grade will be based on a final exam and work on a mock patent application.

Practicum-Civil (Richard J. Wharton)
LWLP565

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Evidence

The Legal Practicum is an innovative and creative approach to legal education. The course simulates as realistically as possible the practice of law in a small firm setting. Participants are placed in two-partner firms and handle diverse cases. You will be taught by law school faculty and highly regarded local attorneys who specialize in the area of law in which you are working. (If you have taken Lawyering Skills II you are not eligible to take this course.Prerequisite: Evidence

Note: Students may only elect this course or Lawyering Skills II to count toward the Civil Litigation Concentration (JD).

Professional Responsibility (Junichi P. Semitsu)
LWAA580

3 credit(s)

The roles of the lawyer in society and the obligations implied in those roles are examined. Topics include disciplinary standards and procedures, the history and organization of the legal profession; avoiding conflict of interest; obligations to clients, the courts, and society, and conflicts presented by the adversary system for settlements of disputes; and responsibilities of lawyers as public servants and citizens. American Bar standards will be reviewed.

Property (Staff)
LWAA530

4 credit(s)

Consideration is given, in both a historical and modern sense, to the rights and obligations that arise out of the legal ownership of possessory and non-possessory interests, tangible, and to a limited extent, intangible, personal, and real property. Areas covered include estates in land, landlord-tenant, conveyancing, land development, public and private control of land use, non-possessory rights in land, bailments, lost and misplaced property, gifts, and an introduction to gratuitous transfers of realty.

Public Interest Law & Practice (Robert C. Fellmeth)
LWPP570

4-5 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)

4 or 5 credits - Year-long course Students study the substantive laws governing the functioning and decision making of state administrative agencies. These laws include the "sunshine statutes" which require most agency decision making to take place in public and guarantee public access to most agency records (the open meetings acts and the California Public Records Act) and the state Administrative Procedure Act, which governs the process agencies must follow to adopt regulations or take disciplinary action against the license of a licensee. Students also study important limitations on the power of agencies (including constitutional and antitrust limitations), and the functioning of the state legislature, which may enact, repeal, or amend the enabling acts of most agencies. As part of their coursework, students are assigned to monitor two California agencies; they travel all over the state to attend agency meetings, monitor and analyze their activities, interview agency officials and licensees, and track rulemaking, legislation, and litigation affecting their agencies. Twice during the year, students submit written reports on the activities of their assigned agencies. These reports are edited by CPIL professional staff and published, with attribution to the student author, in the Center's California Regulatory Law Reporter, the only legal journal of its kind in the nation; the Reporter is reprinted in full on Westlaw. Students wishing to take Public Interest Law and Practice should pre-register for the course. Public Interest and Practice is subject to a special application procedure or visit the CPIL’s offices (rear door of the LRC) for further information.

Note: This course may be applied as one of the three required courses for the Public Interest Law Concentration (JD).

Public Interest Law Clinic (Robert C. Fellmeth)
LWVL544

1-3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)

Students who enjoy Public Interest Law and Practice frequently go on to take Public Interest Law Clinic, in which they may design their own writing or advocacy project related to regulatory or public interest law. In the past, these projects have included written critiques of agencies or agency programs; petitioning an agency to adopt regulations; drafting model legislation; participating in litigation to enforce the state's "sunshine statutes"; or submitting amicus curiae briefs on public interest issues pending appeal. Student critiques of publishable quality may satisfy USD's written work requirement. Students interested in Public Interest Law Clinic must secure a permission slip prior to pre-registration from Professor Julie D'Angelo Fellmeth at CPIL's offices. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

Religion & the Constitution (Steven D. Smith)
LWPP575

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing

The First Amendment appears to single "religion" out for special constitutional status, but just what "religion" is and how and why it deserves special legal treatment are questions that have vexed citizens and courts from the nation's beginning. This seminar will consider these questions in their legal, historical, and theoretical dimensions. The seminar will favor class discussion of issues and materials, and students will be expected to prepare and present a paper on an issue of their choice related to the subject of the seminar.

Remedies (Gail Heriot)
LWLP570

4 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD), Civil Litigation (JD)

Legal and equitable remedies under statutes and the common law are examined and compared. The course focuses on methods of evaluating alternative remedies and arguing for or against their creation or use in a given case. The course objective is to enable the student not only to identify all available remedies but also to choose the preferred remedy from among them. The principal subjects covered are equity, restitution and damages.

Note: This is a required course for the Civil Litigation Concentration (JD). This course may be applied as one of the three required courses for the Public Interest Law Concentration (JD).

Scientific Evidence (Hon. Howard Shore)
LWCR570

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Law (LLMG)
Prerequisite(s): Evidence

This course will address the technical requirements under California law for admissibility of both established and new forms of scientific evidence. Possible topics include fingerprints, serology, odontology, DNA and others. Students will apply the principles of admissibility by participating in realistic foundational hearings in the classroom, and will present papers on specific forms of scientific evidence. Prerequisite: Evidence

Securities Regulation (Michael P. McCloskey)
LWBC580

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB), Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), Public Interest Law (JD), Business and Corporate Law (JD)
Prerequisite(s): Corporations or concurrent enrollment

The Securities Regulation class will include an overview of the capital markets and the underwriting process, the structure and prohibitions of the Securities Act, the registration process, the definitions of security and exempted securities, the private and limited offering exemptions, offerings by underwriters, affiliates and dealers, civil liability under the Securities Act, fraud in connection with a purchase or sale of a Security, and general civil liability provisions. Prerequisite: Corporations must be taken prior to or concurrently with this course.

Note: This is a required course for the Business and Corporate Law Concentration (JD).

Small Claims Clinic I (Franco Simone)
LWVL545

2-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD)

The Small Claims Clinic offers students the opportunity to develop interviewing and counseling skills as well as trial preparation skills in the Small Claims Court context. Students assist low-income families in preparing their cases for trial at Small Claims Court and can represent clients in the appeals process in Superior Court. Students must also be available to participate in outreach presentations at various community locations and times. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No Prerequisites.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Civil Litigation Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Civil Litigation Concentration

Small Claims Clinic II (Franco Simone)
LWVL546

2-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Civil Litigation (JD)

The Small Claims Clinic offers students the opportunity to develop interviewing and counseling skills as well as trial preparation skills in the Small Claims Court context. Students assist low-income families in preparing their cases for trial at Small Claims Court and can represent clients in the appeals process in Superior Court. Students must also be available to participate in outreach presentations at various community locations and times. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No Prerequisites.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Civil Litigation Concentration web page for more information.
Additional Information: Civil Litigation Concentration

Special Ed and the Law (Margaret A. Dalton)
LWPP578

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)

This class is designed to train students to respond to the legal needs of families whose children have physical, learning, or emotional disabilities. Course work covers the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), governing the rights of students with disabilities to special education and related services in public schools. Class includes the application of IDEA and federal regulations to the Individualized Education Program (IEP), placements, discipline provisions, procedural safeguards including due process hearings and legal remedies. Statutory and case law are utilized to assist students in understanding this complex and emerging area of specialization. No prerequisite.

Sports Law (Leonard B. Simon)
LWBC585

2 credit(s)

This course will address the often unique manner in which substantive law applies to the business of sports. Topics will include interpretation and enforcement of player contracts, antitrust, labor law and unions, governance of professional sports leagues by Commissioners, the role and regulation of agents, governance of collegiate and other amateur sports by NCAA and others, and remedies for gender discrimination in sports. Please take note that this is a serious law course, not a chat session about sports. Regular attendance and preparation is required. Some of the issues, such as antitrust, are difficult. The final exam is challenging. Do not register for the course unless you are prepared to take it seriously.

State & Local Gov't Law (John Sansone, John H. Minan)
LWPP568

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Public Interest Law (JD)

The State and Local Government course will examine the distribution and exercise of power by state and local government, both vertically and horizontally, within the federal system. In addition to studying foundational structural principles, such as sources of authority and constitutional and statutory limits on its exercise, the course will consider emerging issues involving California state government and San Diego local government that dominate our lives today. Students wishing additional detail are encouraged to consult the text for the class, which is State and Local Government in a Federal System (6th ed.), published by LexisNexis and authored by Daniel Mandelker, et al. One important objective is to learn how theory informs practice and how practice informs theory. This will be accomplished through the use of problems, handouts, class discussion, and creative teaching techniques. It is offered as a two-credit hour, exam-graded course. Regular class attendance and participation are required.

Note: This course may be applied as one of the three required courses for the Public Interest Law Concentration (JD).

State Income Tax Clinic I (Craig Shaltes)
LWVL560

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

This Tax Appeals Assistance Program is a joint effort between USD Legal Clinics and the California State Board of Equalization. Under the supervision of an attorney from the California Taxpayers’ Rights Advocate Office, students will assist taxpayers with their state tax appeals. Students receive legal practice skills training, including interviewing clients, identifying evidence, drafting appeals briefs, and representing clients in negotiations with the State Board and at hearing. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

State Income Tax Clinic II (Craig Shaltes)
LWVL561

1-2 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)
Prerequisite(s): Tax I

This Tax Appeals Assistance Program is a joint effort between USD Legal Clinics and the California State Board of Equalization. Under the supervision of an attorney from the California Taxpayers’ Rights Advocate Office, students will assist taxpayers with their state tax appeals. Students receive legal practice skills training, including interviewing clients, identifying evidence, drafting appeals briefs, and representing clients in negotiations with the State Board and at hearing. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

State Sales & Use Tax Clinic I (Michael J. Larkin)
LWVL562

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

This State Sales & Use Tax Clinic is a joint effort between USD Legal Clinics and the California State Board of Equalization. Under the supervision of an attorney from the California Taxpayers' Rights Advocate Office, students will assist taxpayers at the Petitions stage of proceedings instituted against them by the Franchise Tax Board. Students receive legal practice skills training, including gathering evidence, preparing legal briefs, participating in negotiation proceedings and oral argument at an administrative hearing. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

State Sales & Use Tax Clinic II (Michael J. Larkin)
LWVL563

1-2 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

This State Sales & Use Tax Clinic is a joint effort between USD Legal Clinics and the California State Board of Equalization. Under the supervision of an attorney from the California Taxpayers' Rights Advocate Office, students will assist taxpayers at the Petitions stage of proceedings instituted against them by the Franchise Tax Board. Students receive legal practice skills training, including gathering evidence, preparing legal briefs, participating in negotiation proceedings and oral argument at an administrative hearing. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No prerequisites.

Tax Exempt Organizations (Kenneth Coveney, Paul J. Dostart)
LWTE562

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)
Prerequisite(s): Tax I

This course will address the concept and basis for tax exemption; classification as a Private Foundation; special issues relating to Public Charities, charities as operating entities, fundraising issues; California Law applicable to tax exempt organizations; and Unrelated Business Income Taxation (UBIT). There will be 4-8 hrs. p/wk reading assignments in Treasury Regulations. Attendance is mandatory. A student will not be permitted to sit for the final exam if she/he has not attended at least 70% of the class sessions. Grade determined by final examination. Prerequisite: Tax I

Tax I (Dennis Lilly)
LWAA590

3 credit(s)

Tax I provides students with an understanding of the basic principles of federal income tax, including gross income, deductions, tax accounting, capital transactions, and income shifting. Required for upper-class students.

Tax Litigation (Richard Carpenter)
LWTE565

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

This course provides a comprehensive review of prelitigation IRS administrative procedures, practical analysis in the selection of a choice of forum to litigate a federal tax dispute, pre-trial practice and case analysis, trial techniques and strategies when litigating a federal tax dispute before the U.S. Tax Court, and a review of refund litigation. Prerequisite: Tax I. This is an advanced tax course with priority enrollment for LLM in Taxation students.

Tax Policy (Jordan M. Barry)
LWAA505

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

This course will offer an introduction to the principal policy considerations raised when creating a tax system. Topics will include the merits of different tax systems (such as income and consumption taxes), questions of tax administration and legal complexity, the efficiency implications of taxation, and distributional implications. It will consider how well current legislation addresses these various issues and consider whether there are ways that they might be better addressed. The class will be conducted as a seminar and will likely include guest experts who will join us in discussions of particular topics. Tax I is a prerequisite for this course; other tax courses, especially Tax II, would be useful, but are not required.

Note: This is a required course for the LLM in Taxation degree.

Tax Policy (Hon. David Laro)
LWTE570

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

Tax Policy is a reflection of the country's social, economic and political history. Alongside the question of how much to tax, is the critical decision of how to allocate the tax burden among the various taxpayers. Deciding who is to be taxed and how much to tax them is the substance of this course on the tax policy. We will examine tax policy by looking at the tax legislative process, the policy makers, and various code provisions as part of the focus on various tax issues and problems. Students will be required to write short papers on tax issues throughout the course. Grades will be based on the short papers and the final paper. A final paper on an assigned subject will be due after the class ends. The final paper is not intended to and does not fulfill the JD Written Work requirement of the law school. This is an advanced tax course. Prerequisites: Tax I & II (LLM’s may take Tax II concurrently)This course begins January 9 and ends March 28, 2012.

Note: This is a required course for the LLM in Taxation degree.

Tax Research & Communication (Susan Shaler)
LWTE580

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)
Prerequisite(s): Tax I

This course involves an intensive examination of federal tax research techniques, including locating and evaluating legislative history, administrative authorities,and judicial decisions with attention to comparative weights and relationships among various authorities. Students are required to conduct various research and validation tasks, and to prepare complex tax documents, such as, ruling requests, protests, opinion letters, memoranda of law, and Tax Court petitions. Enrollment is limited to 12 students (no JDs) with priority to 1) December graduates and 2) full-time students.

Note: This class is restricted to LLM Taxation students.

Taxation of Business Conduits (Willard B. Taylor)
LWTE579

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)
Prerequisite(s): Tax I, Tax II

This course will cover business entities that are not subject to the corporate tax – regulated investment companies (or RICs), real estate investment trusts (or REITs), fixed investment trusts, real estate mortgage investment conduits (or REMICs), publicly-traded (or master limited) partnerships, and S corporations. The course will consist largely of lectures, but (hopefully) with active participation by students. The goal is understand the pass-through entity rules and how they have evolved (and are evolving) and also to consider policy issues raised by the rules. As a consequence, the questions are broad (e.g., Why do we have so many pass-through entities? Why do the rules for each differ? What are the issues for different classes of investors?) and narrow (e.g., How is entity-level tax eliminated in the case of a RIC? In the case of a REMIC? In the case of an S corporation?). In addition to assigned readings, students will be asked to discuss specific questions that will be provided at the end of each class – not in writing but in a back-and-forth discussion in the following class. Class participation will be a part of the grade for the course. In addition to class participation, there will be 2 hour open book exam or, in the alternative, a student may prepare one written paper of approximately 20 pages on a topic of the student’s choice.

Taxation of Intellectual Property (John I. Forry)
LWTE572

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

Intellectual Property development and exploitation are very significant for many businesses. This requires attention to IP legal protection and dispute resolution, but also to IP taxation in both the US and abroad. This course addresses key tax challenges and opportunities – in both the US and selected other countries – affecting IP development and exploitation. The course first focuses on basic tax rules such as treatment of income and expenses as ordinary or capital, source of income, timing of income recognition, and the effects of tax treaties on taxation of cross-border IP transactions. The course then applies such rules to selected business arrangements involving IP such as sales, licenses and cost sharing arrangements, financing techniques such as securitization, and business combinations such as mergers and joint ventures. The aim is to impart solutions for developing and exploiting IP in light of US and other tax rules. At the beginning of the course, students are assigned to teams. Each team is provided with a brief case study proposing one or more of the IP business arrangements covered in the course. In the final sessions of the course, each team makes a presentation and provides a paper covering key tax challenges and opportunities presented by its case study. One or more previous courses in taxation and/or intellectual property law are recommended but not required.

Tech Entrepreneur Law Clinic (Ted Sichelman)
LWVL570

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property (JD)

This course places students at local law firms to provide legal assistance to local technology startups in the areas of intellectual property prosecution and licensing, corporate formation and transactions, contracts, employment, and related areas. Students will be supervised by attorneys at local law firms as well as the professor. The course will begin with 2-3 weeks of class sessions covering the core types of transactions encountered in technology startups. There are no scheduled classes during the remainder of the semester; instead, students will work with the companies and supervising lawyers each week, and meet one-on-one with the professor on a regular basis. An application process will be used to select students for the course. Students who registered for the course during 2010-11 may not apply for the course for 2011-12. The course application and additional course information will be emailed no later than Friday, April 8, 2011. Students who do not receive an application by April 8, 2011, or who have questions about the course after reviewing the application, may email Professor Ted Sichelman, tsichelman@sandiego.edu. The deadline to submit an application for this course has been extended to Friday, April 29, 2011.

Note: There are limitations on JD concentration eligibility. Please check the Intellectual Property Concentration web page for more information. Contact Law Student Affairs to find out if your work in this clinic qualifies for the concentration.
Additional Information: Intellectual Property Concentration, Email Law Student Affairs

Topics in Family Law (Michael B. Kelly)
LWFC570

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing

This seminar permits students to explore advanced issues in family law or community property in more detail than a survey course. Each student will prepare and present a paper on a topic chosen by the student with input from the professor. Successful completion of the paper will satisfy the upper class writing requirement. Students should consider what topic they may wish to explore even before the first class. Students receive letter grades (ABCDF) for the course. The seminar will progress through three stages: a brief introduction to family law and community property; a discussion of several interesting articles addressing important issues in family law; and the presentation of student papers. Topics studied will vary, but may include the evolving definition of family, the appropriate role of the state in regulating or protecting families or family members, the role of private agreements in forming or governing families, and ways family law serves (or should serve) the needs of children.

Torts (Staff)
LWAA540

4 credit(s)

An exploration of the principles involved in determining whether an injured person should be compensated for harm caused by another, including such diverse topics as intentional harms, negligence, and strict liability.

Trade Secrets (Kris B. Panikowski)
LWIP575

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property (LLMC), Intellectual Property (JD), Intellectual Property Law (LLMG)

This course takes a theoretical and practical approach to learning trade secret law by employing both the socratic and case methods of instruction. A range of issues will be explored, including examination of what constitutes a trade secret, the intersection of trade secret law with other bodies of law, strategies for determining what constitutes a protectable trade secret, the methods for protecting trade secrets, and litigation tactics when trade secrets are at issue. Class sessions will include active discussion and analysis of the law and the policies behind the law. In addition, we will examine documents that seek to protect trade secrets and that appear in trade secret litigation. Students will be “on call” several weeks during the session. Prerequisite: Property. Grade determined by final exam, assignments and class participation.

Trusts & Estates: Community Property (Robert F. Wesley)
LWTE544

2-3 credit(s)

In this course the non-tax aspects of estate planning are integrated, combining wills, trusts, future interests, and community property. Methods of family wealth transfer in both community property and non-community property jurisdictions are considered, including: inter vivos gifts, wills, trusts, intestate succession and will substitutes. Fiduciary administration; class gifts; powers of appointment; the rule against perpetuities; charitable trusts; classification, control and management of community property; and the distribution of property on dissolution of the community are studied.

Trusts & Estates: Wills & Trusts (Michael Yu)
LWTE555

3 credit(s)

This survey course provides an introduction to non-tax aspects of estate planning and the law of gratuitous transfers, including inter vivos gifts, intestate succession, wills, will substitutes, trusts, fiduciary administration, and future interests.

UCC: Sales (David W. Brennan)
LWBC592

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), Business and Corporate Law (JD), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

The course on sales of goods addresses the provisions of Article 2 of the U.C.C., with some comparisons with the new Article 2A on leases of goods. The primary topics include contract formation and enforceability, terms of the contract, risk of loss, warranties, performance and breach, remedies for breach, and transfer of goods. A problem-solving approach is used extensively.

Valuation (Hon. David Laro)
LWTE585

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Business and Corporate Law (JD), LLM in Taxation (LLMT)

This course encompasses the ever expanding body of law as it relates to valuation of business interest. Topics include the proper standard of valuation, various valuation methods, and the use of discounts and premiums. The class will review business valuation issues with respect to family limited partnerships, estate planning, corporation transactions, and other areas. Cutting edge issues such as valuing high tech companies will be covered. Prerequisites: Tax I; Tax II and/or Corporations is recommended. This is an advanced tax course with priority enrollment for LLM in Taxation students. This class begins January 9 and ends March 28, 2012.

White Collar Crime (Jason A. Forge, Eric J. Beste)
LWBC595

2 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Criminal Law (LLMG), Criminal Law (LLMC), Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), Public Interest Law (JD), Criminal Litigation (JD), Business and Corporate Law (JD), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB)

The course will cover a variety of topics related to the defense and prosecution of "white collar" criminal offenses, with a particular focus on emerging trends in the law arising from recent corporate scandals and prosecutions. The lectures will emphasize strategies for conducting internal investigations of corporations and their officers and directors, as well as tactics used by law enforcement in conducting white collar grand jury investigations and criminal prosecutions. In this regard, the course will be geared towards students interested in pursuing careers as prosecutors or criminal defense attorneys, as well as those who may represent corporate clients generally. Top ^
Note: Students may only elect this course or Federal Crimes to count toward the Criminal Litigation Concentration (JD).

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