Course Descriptions

Summer 2014 Class Descriptions: Electives

European Union Law - Barcelona (Jaume Saura Estapà, Andreu Olesti Rayo)
LWYB535

2 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Study Abroad (JD)

This course examines the institutional framework of the European Union; remedies and enforcement before national courts and European Union courts; and selected substantive law provisions relating to free movement of goods, persons, and services, the right of establishment, environmental policy, and equal rights for women.  The final exam will be held on Friday, June 20, 2014 at 9:00 am.

Note: Class meets M,T,W, TH & F from 11:00 am - 12:50 pm

Evidence (Jeffrey Bellin)
LWLP529

4 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Criminal Litigation (JD), Civil Litigation (JD), Criminal Law (LLMC), Criminal Law (LLMG)

This course is intended to provide students with the ability to identify and correctly analyze evidentiary issues under the Federal Rules of Evidence and analogous state evidence codes, with reference to constitutional provisions where applicable. The course also provides a framework for evaluating the policy rationales that animate evidence doctrine. Primary topics will include: relevance, character evidence, witness impeachment and corroboration, hearsay (and the hearsay exceptions), the Confrontation Clause, and expert and lay opinion testimony.

Note: This is a required course for the Civil Litigation (JD) and Criminal Litigation (JD) concentrations.

Family Law Advocacy (Hon. Christopher T. Whitten)
LWFC538

2 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Children's Rights (JD)

Family Law is one of the faster growing areas of law, with more new pleadings filed annually than almost any other area of law. The skills need to practice in this area are unique. By the end of this class, students will have a better understanding of the real life issues confronting family law attorneys. This course focuses on the skills which are essential to the successful practice of family law, briefly reviewing general aspects of substantive law but concentrating on the special skill set required by these attorneys, from interviewing new clients to drafting pleadings, making and executing discovery plans, drafting and arguing motions, preparing for evidentiary hearings, and actually trying a family law case. In the first week, students will form small group "trial teams" which will work together throughout the semester. The class combines lectures, Socratic discussions, demonstrations, observing real family law proceedings, online discussion and journaling, skill-building exercises and learn-by-doing practice by students of the relevant skills with feedback from faculty, local practitioners and local judges. Ethical issues unique to family law are also emphasized

Intellectual Property & Business (Marcel Saucet, Ted Sichelman)
LWIP572

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (LLMG), Intellectual Property (LLMC), Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB), Intellectual Property (JD), Business and Corporate Law (JD)
Recommended Class(es): IP Survey or any course in patent law

The best intellectual property and tech-focused corporate lawyers have a thorough understanding of the ways clients use and are affected by IP in their daily business. This seminar will provide an introduction to how patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets (1) are used by IP owners to further their business strategies and (2) affect non-IP owners, who must often license IP rights at substantial cost. Specific topics include: the role of trademarks in promoting product “branding”; the use of patents in commercializing inventions; the effects of trade secrecy on R & D investment and employee mobility; IP and the emerging field of “microinnovation”; the effects of copyright on Internet business models; the use of IP by startup companies; private markets for buying, selling, and licensing IP rights; the role of patents in biotech deals; copyrights in the entertainment industry; and trademarks and “luxury” goods. The course will be co-taught by a law professor (Sichelman) and a business school professor (Saucet). The majority of the course will consist of lectures and classroom discussions. The only assignment is a paper, which students will present at the end of the course. Prerequisites: None. Either a course in intellectual property law or some work experience at a technology company is recommended, but not required.

International Art Law - Florence (Herbert I. Lazerow)
LWYF537

2 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): International Law (JD), Study Abroad (JD)

Legal and ethical principles involving international trade in cultural property (works of art, artifacts, archaeological remains). The movement of art across international borders in time of war, colonial periods and occupation. Fakes; incorrect attribution; works of dubious provenance; stolen and expropriated works; return and repatriation, including litigation problems; import and export controls; tariffs; loans; legal relationships between artists, collectors, galleries, auctioneers and museums; and artists' rights and responsibilities, including copyright, trademark, the rights of publicity and privacy, moral rights, re-sale royalties, and taxes.  The final exam will be held on Thursday, June 19, 2014 at 9:00 am.

Note: Class meets M,T,W, TH & F from 9:00 am - 10:50 am

International Business Transactions - London (Amelia Boss, Roger Clark)
LWYL539

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): International Law (JD), Study Abroad (JD)

National and international laws that apply to international business transactions, like international sales law, letters of credit, international litigation and commercial arbitration, import and export controls, intellectual property licensing and distributorships, and international antitrust.  The final exam will be held on Friday, August 1, 2014 at 9:00 am.

Note: Class meets M,T,W, TH & F from 11:05 am - 1:00 pm. This class may count as a required course for the International Law Concentration (JD)

International Copyright Law - Florence (Jane C. Ginsburg)
LWYF554

2 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): International Law (JD), Study Abroad (JD)

International markets abound for works of authorship (such as literature, music, films, software). Digital media (such as the internet) have augmented these international exchanges, and made them pervasive. International disputes inevitably result. We will begin with an overview of the structure and norms of the principal treaties (Berne Convention, TRIPs Accord, WIPO Copyright Treaties); examine their implementation in the domestic copyright laws of the U.S. and the European Union; and the private international law questions that arise, notably as a result of divergences in domestic norms. We will address jurisdiction over remote parties (judicial competence) as well as which country’s copyright laws apply (legislative competence), and the importance of territoriality.  The final exam will be held on Friday, June 20, 2014 at 9:00 am.

Note: Class meets M,T,W, TH & F from 11:00 am - 12:50 pm

International Corporations - London (Eric L. Talley)
LWYL552

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Study Abroad (JD), International Law (JD)

In virtually every area of cross-border practice, some rudimentary knowledge about the laws governing business organizations (and particularly corporations) proves helpful. This course provides much of that foundation, examining the laws governing the modern business associations. We will cover a number of topics, including corporate formation, corporate identity, rights of creditors, fiduciary duties, corporate governance, executive compensation, mergers and acquisitions and securities fraud. Our emphasis will be on how global firms navigate the legal and regulatory waters of different jurisdictions. Consequently, our key goal will be to understand the rudimentary structure of each of the above topics, and how the topics interrelate – in particular how comparative company law mediates relationships among different “constituencies” of the firm, including owners, managers, creditors, employees, customers, and suppliers.  The final exam will be held on Thursday, July 31, 2014 at 9:00 am.

Note: Class meets M,T,W, TH & F from 9:00 am - 10:55 am

International Human Rights - Paris (Dustin N. Sharp, Hon. M. Margaret McKeown)
LWYP550

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): International Law (JD), Study Abroad (JD)

In the brief span of 60 years, the idea of human rights has grown tremendously. What began as a marginal utopian discourse has today arguably become “the dominant moral narrative for thinking about world affairs.” At the same time, rights remain controversial and contested, and gaps in enforcement of human rights norms are conspicuous. This course examines the actors, organizations and ideas behind these developments, as well as the vast challenges we face today in attempting to enforce human rights norms globally. The course begins by examining the philosophical and political bases for the international human rights idea, probing the ongoing debate over universality, culture, and human rights. As part of this inquiry, we also examine the normative pillars of international human rights law. In the second part of the course, we will analyze various dimensions and challenges of human rights enforcement, including the main United Nations and regional human rights systems, prosecutions and transitional justice, the advocacy work of NGOs and human rights activists, and the new concept of the “responsibility to protect,” or R2P. In the final part of the semester, we will engage in a more in-depth examination of several distinct human rights issues, including torture and women’s rights. In all this, the course aims to provide students with knowledge of human rights at the level of intellectual theory and discourse, as well as a realm of concrete, “real world” action, controversy, and struggle.  The final exam will be held on Friday, August 1, 2014 at 9:00 am.

Note: Class meets M,T,W, TH & F from 11:05 am - 1:00 pm

International Negotiation - Barcelona (Allen C. Snyder)
LWYB554

2 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): International Law (JD), Study Abroad (JD)

Skills and theory of both competitive and cooperative international negotiating will be learned through simulation and experience. The final exam will be held on Thursday, June 19, 2014. (Program dates: May 26-June 20, 2014)

Note: Class meets M,T,W,Th & F - 9:00-10:50am

International Telecommunications Law (Linda B. Dubroof)
LWIP554

2 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (LLMG), Intellectual Property (LLMC), International Law (JD), Intellectual Property (JD), Intellectual Property Law (MSLS)

Spectrum is a limited resource that does not stop at a nation’s borders. This course will examine global telecommunications issues and conflicts including those that arise out of the Internet, privacy concerns, the unregulated flow of information, spectrum interference, and the introduction of new technologies and their effect on competition in the world marketplace. We will explore strategies to achieve global harmonization of spectrum and regulation of new technologies that may require new international standards. In the course of our exploration, we will focus on the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the United Nations umbrella organization where regulators and stakeholders convene to discuss and reach consensus on a variety of spectrum, telecommunications, and development issues within the ITU’s three bureaus: Radiocommunication, Telecommunications and Development. The class will also cover the nature and scope of U.S. delegations to international telecommunication conferences, including the World Radiocommunication Conference and the World Telecommunication Standards Conference, regional conferences focusing on the Organization of American States (OAS) and the Americas Region representational group, and international telecommunications treaties. Topics will range from building a global information society to rebuilding infrastructure after major disasters. We will review the role of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in international telecommunications policy and practice and compare the U.S. independent, transparent regulatory model with other telecommunications regulatory regimes. The majority of the course will consist of lectures and classroom discussions, including an experiential component where students will take on the role of global telecommunications stakeholders negotiating the minefield of emerging competitive forces, technological innovation and regulatory frameworks. Grades will be determined by weekly assignments, class participation and a formal presentation.

Law of Tax Appraisals (Hon. David Laro)
LWTE572

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Taxation (MSLS), LLM in Taxation (LLMT), Taxation (LLMC)

Students will learn about the dynamic and developing tax law as it pertains to the statutes, regulations, and cases relating to qualified appraisers, qualified appraisals, the strict versus substantial compliance doctrines, and the reasonable cause exception. Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively evaluate appraisers and appraisals taxpayers and their counsel regularly utilize to support tax benefits in circumstances ranging from estates to business transactions. Currently pending in the U.S. Tax Court are approximately 200 cases involving alleged non-compliance with qualified appraiser/appraisal tax regulations. The government estimates that there are billions involved in lost revenue due to taxpayer non-compliance. Finally students will learn the IRS penalties imposed on taxpayers, their attorneys, and appraisers for non-compliance. Students are expected to write short memoranda and make a power point presentation in lieu of a final examination.

Legal Research Bootcamp (Karl Gruben)
LWLP554

1 credit(s), P/F Graded

This course will cover the basics of legal research, plus some advanced techniques, such that the student should be prepared to enter the workforce with adequate to superior research skills. Included will be paper-based resources, but online sources will be discussed and demonstrated where necessary, such as the online versions of Shepards and Keycite, as well as indexes. The course is pass-fail and passing will be based on class attendance, CALI exercises, and some homework assignments.

Negotiation (Gregg Relyea)
LWLP560

2 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Labor and Employment Law (LLMG), Business and Corporate Law (LLMC), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB), Civil Litigation (JD), Business and Corporate Law (MSLS)

This class is about negotiation and dispute resolution: how not to lose when thinking win-win. Many negotiators fail to maximize their outcomes because they either take extreme, unyielding positions or because they look for an optimal ‘win-win' solution and in the process give their counterpart value that they could capture themselves. This course focuses on the strategy behind dispute resolution (negotiation, mediation, arbitration) and speaks in a practical way about how to use that strategy to maximize what can be achieved in those situations. Through a combination of lectures, in-class exercises, class discussions and guest speakers, the class will explore the different methods of dispute resolution, and how to maximize your outcome in each. The first part of the course highlights the difference between the different types of dispute resolution. We'll then focus on game theory and its role in negotiation. We'll then focus on how to maximize the potential overall value of the outcome to all parties in a dispute… and subsequently how to capture a disproportionate share. Grade determined by weekly assignments, class participation and a final examination. This class will be graded on the four-tier pass/fail grading system.

Note: Students may only elect this course or Alternative Dispute Resolution to count towards the Civil Litigation Concentration (JD).

Public International Law - Paris (Paul B. Stephan)
LWYP578

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): Study Abroad (JD)

This course will cover the basic features of the international legal order, including: the nature and sources of international law; statehood, international jurisdiction and sovereign immunity; the law of treaties; the relationship between international law and domestic law; and international dispute settlement. It will also provide an introduction to selected substantive areas: the law of the sea, international trade and investment, and the use of armed force.  The final exam will be held on Thursday, July 31, 2014 at 9:00 am.

Note: Class meets M,T,W, TH & F from 9:00 am - 10:55 am

Trademark Strategy Skills (Dana Robinson, Marcel Saucet)
LWIP579

3 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property Law (MSLS), Intellectual Property Law (LLMG), Intellectual Property (LLMC), Intellectual Property (JD)

Brand and trademark strategies are primary skills not only in for-profit companies, but also non-profits, including non-governmental organizations (NGOs). This hands-on, skills course will provide an introduction to how trademarks are used by NGOs, specifically the World Council of Peoples for the United Nations (WCPUN), to protect its brands internationally. Specific topics include the role of trademarks in promoting sustainable development, the role trademarks play in international brand strategy, and the various U.S. and international trademark laws and procedures NGOs must follow. The majority of the course will consist of lectures and a study case. Students will prepare legal memoranda in teams for WCPUN. The course will be graded on a 4 tier pass-fail basis. Prerequisites: Students must have taken IP Survey, Trademark Law, Trademarks Seminar, or International IP to be eligible for this course.

Trusts & Estates (Dennis Lilly)
LWTE555

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded

This survey course provides an introduction to non-tax aspects of estate planning and the law of gratuitous transfers, including inter vivos gifts, intestate succession, wills, will substitutes, trusts, fiduciary administration, and future interests.

View by Semester

Click on a semester below, then narrow your search by choosing a sub-item.