Course Descriptions

Spring 2012 LLM in International Law Class Descriptions

  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Y
  • Z

Ethics, Law & Int'l Affairs (Horacio Spector)
LWJT515

1 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI)

Contemporary public policy and legal debates in both the domestic and international arenas involve an intricate network of moral, political, and legal considerations. The seminar’s ambitious goal is to throw light on the relations among these three fundamental realms: ethics, politics, and law. After a general introduction, we will proceed to discuss the following topics: conceptions of liberty and equality, democracy and public deliberation, human rights, and the rule of law. Our attention will be focused on issues that cross national boundaries: Is democracy more important than the rule of law? Does economic equality threaten liberty? Are welfare rights compatible with civil liberties in illiberal democracies? What’s the place of choice in social welfare regimes? Is well being synonymous with income? In the last part of the seminar, we will deal with complex global issues: wars and military interventions, terrorism, and global justice. Can military force be used to protect human rights? Should rich nations transfer money to poor countries? Should pharmaceutical patents be enforced in the undeveloped world? Is there a global community? Students will be required to write a short paper (10-12 pages).

Immigration Clinic I (Jan Joseph Bejar)
LWVL530

2-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI)

Students gain practical experience through interviewing, counseling, and representing clients with immigration-related problems. Students complete forms and draft documents on behalf of clients. Students also attend and/or participate at hearings at Immigration Court. Weekly meetings are held with the clinic supervisor to discuss immigration law, practical application and casework. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. No Prerequisites.

Immigration Clinic II (Jan Joseph Bejar)
LWVL531

2-4 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI)
Prerequisite(s): Immigration Clinic I

Students gain practical experience through interviewing, counseling, and representing clients with immigration-related problems. Students complete forms and draft documents on behalf of clients. Students also attend and/or participate at hearings at Immigration Court. Weekly meetings are held with the clinic supervisor to discuss immigration law, practical application and casework. The clinic is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis.

International Arbitration (Richard W. Page)
LWIC530

2 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI)

This is an introduction to arbitration in general and international arbitration in particular. The course will be taught from the perspective of a lawyer with international clients who practices (or hopes to practice) in California. That lawyer will need to know about: (1) the advantages and disadvantages of arbitration, (2) the legal framework for domestic and international arbitration, (3) the drafting and enforceability of the agreement to arbitrate, (4) choice of administering institution and the arbitration rules, (5) selection of the arbitration panel, (6) conduct of the arbitration hearing, and (7) enforceability of the final arbitration award. The course materials will be a recent casebook on "International Commercial Arbitration" and a statutory supplement. The final exam will be held during the last class meeting. Students are graded by the standard letter grading system.

International Intellectual Property (Lisa P. Ramsey)
LWIP545

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI)

This course examines international protection of intellectual property. We will discuss international treaties, trade agreements, and dispute resolution systems relating to trademarks, patents, copyrights, and related rights. The course will also cover acquisition and enforcement of intellectual property rights in foreign markets. Prerequisites: None

International Negotiation (Charles B. Wiggins)
LWIC548

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI)

The course will include specific materials and skill-building exercises on cross-cultural aspects of the bargaining process. Participants will include lawyers from other nations who are enrolled in USD's LLMC program, and upper class American JD students. Four-tier Pass/Fail grading.

International Organizations (Jorge A. Vargas)
LWIC552

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Writing
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI)

The course is designed to analyze some of the major international environmental problems of interest to the United States. A wide variety of current and traditional transborder legal questions regarding international rivers, marine and air pollution, toxic waste and hazardous materials, endangered species, and nuclear radiation are discussed. Special emphasis is given to contemporary legal questions, including a special segment devoted to analyzing the bilateral environmental issues with Canada and Mexico. A research paper is required.

International Sales (William H. Lawrence)
LWIC555

3 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI)

This course focuses on the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods (CISG), with comparisons to domestic law (the UCC in particular). Considerable time is devoted to the application of the CISG to problems that typically arise in international sales transactions. The course does not include an exam. Students instead prepare written memos that reflect the type of assignments they can expect in practice with a law firm.

Latin American Law & Institutions (Horacio Spector)
LWIC559

1 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI)

There is a great distance between current legal institutions in Latin America and those that were originally designed and established Latin American constitutions drew a lot on the U.S. Bill of Rights and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man. In fact, they instituted representative democracy, the inviolability of individual rights, and untrammeled economic freedom. During the twentieth century Latin American countries suffered from great political and legal instability, civil wars, massive human rights violations, economic crises, and a great number of experiments in land reform, emergency powers, financial confiscations, and constitutional engineering. All these phenomena have impinged on Latin American institutions, legal culture, and social norms, thus creating what may be the most impressive natural socio-legal laboratory on earth. The course will be theoretically minded. It will discuss selected problems in Latin American law and institutions in the light of law and economics, law and development, and social and political philosophy. No prior knowledge about Latin American politics or law will be needed. The lessons to be drawn can be generalized to illuminate current legal and social problems in other developing countries and elsewhere. They can also serve to assess various theoretical paradigms.

Law of the Sea (Jorge A. Vargas)
LWIC560

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): LLM in International Law (LLMI)

Instruction concentrates on the origins and development of the legal regime applicable to the uses and resources of the oceans. Special consideration is given to the formulation and codification process of this dynamic branch of public international law, in particular the work and final outcome of the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea. Topics for analysis also will include fishing activities, maritime delimitation, pollution, marine scientific research, and U.S. policy regarding law of the sea matters. A research paper will be required.

View by Semester

Click on a semester below, then narrow your search by choosing a sub-item.