Course Descriptions

Spring 2013 Class Descriptions

Mediation Internship (Agustin Lopez)
LWVL595

1 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

The semester Mediation Skills course and the Mediation Internship are separate, though linked, course offerings. Upon completion of the skills course, students will be eligible to participate in a program allowing them to mediate actual cases filed with the San Diego County Small Claims Court. Students must do the skills training sessions and the mediation internship in the same semester. The student interns will meet with the internship supervisor in two group sessions during the semester and on bi-weekly TWEN sessions.

Mediation Skills (Charles B. Wiggins)
LWLP556

1 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

Mediation is a process by which a trained and impartial third party helps others resolve a dispute. Lawyers use mediation extensively, both as advocates and as neutrals. This course consists of a twenty-four hour basic mediation sills training. Participants will learn to mediate a variety of disputes, using the methodology developed by San Diego's National Conflict Resolution Center. They will receive a certificate of participation upon their successful completion of the training. Participants must commit to attending each of the training sessions as a condition of enrollment. Enrollment is limited to 24 participants. The course is graded on a 4-tier Pass-Fail basis. Completion of Mediation Skills is a prerequisite for enrollment in the Mediation Internship. The semester Mediation Skills course and the Mediation Internship are separate, though linked, course offerings. Upon completion of the skills course, students will be eligible to participate in a program allowing them to mediate actual cases filed with the San Diego County Small Claims Court. Students must do the skills training sessions and the mediation internship in the same semester. To learn more please go to Mediation Internship course description.

Mergers and Acquisitions (Thomas A. Smith)
LWBC570

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Business and Corporate Law (JD), LLM in Business and Corporate Law (LLMB), Business and Corporate Law (LLMC)

This course will examine selected economic, corporate law, and securities law aspects of the acquisition of businesses. Topics covered will include some basic (and necessary) corporate finance theory (such as valuation, efficient capital markets, event studies and option pricing theory); empirical evidence on the social costs and benefits of acquisition activity; the structuring of friendly and hostile acquisitions; the corporate law of takeover defenses; and securities law regulation of acquisition transactions. Some accounting and tax law topics may be touched upon, but they will not be a major focus of the course. Some effort will be made to examine drafting and negotiations aspects of M&A transactions. Corporations is a prerequisite. Students with substantial background in related areas may take Corporations concurrently, with permission. There will be a final exam in the class.

Moot Court Hon. Comp. (Michael Devitt)
LWWI559

0-1 credit(s)
Requirement: Skills

Music, Technology & Copyright (Charles Cronin)
LWIP567

3 credit(s)
Concentration(s): Intellectual Property (JD)

Not long ago copyright was regarded as a sleepy and abstruse corner of law, often confused with patents – another recently glamorized field. The challenges to mid-20th Century copyright law posed by newly ubiquitous digital technologies and the internet brought copyright into the spotlight as the entertainment, music, and software industries became aware of the economic and cultural implications of these developments. Digital technologies, however, are only the most recent of a steady stream of innovations that reshaped copyright law over several centuries. This course will explore the ongoing interplay among music, technology, and copyright with the objective of obtaining a historically informed basis for evaluating current copyright law and litigation involving musical works and sound recordings. For most of the course we will discuss developments in eras following the origins of music printing in the 16th Century. We will concentrate particularly on innovations related to recording and transmission of musical works as sound occurring between the mid-19th Century and the present, and their influence on the development of current copyright law in the U.S. While there are no prerequisites to enroll in this course, students who have not completed a course in intellectual property will likely need to spend more time becoming familiar with IP fundamentals than will those students who have already taken an IP course. Grades will be based on a final exam.

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