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Summer Abroa 2014 Class Descriptions

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International Art Law - Florence (LWYF537)

Instructor(s): Herbert Lazerow

2 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): International Law, Study Abroad

Legal and ethical principles involving international trade in cultural property (works of art, artifacts, archaeological remains). The movement of art across international borders in time of war, colonial periods and occupation. Fakes; incorrect attribution; works of dubious provenance; stolen and expropriated works; return and repatriation, including litigation problems; import and export controls; tariffs; loans; legal relationships between artists, collectors, galleries, auctioneers and museums; and artists' rights and responsibilities, including copyright, trademark, the rights of publicity and privacy, moral rights, re-sale royalties, and taxes.  The final exam will be held on Thursday, June 19, 2014 at 9:00 am.

Note: Class meets M,T,W, TH & F from 9:00 am - 10:50 am

International Human Rights - Paris (LWYP550)

Instructor(s): Dustin Sharp

3 credit(s), Standard Letter Graded
Concentration(s): International Law, Study Abroad

In the brief span of 60 years, the idea of human rights has grown tremendously. What began as a marginal utopian discourse has today arguably become “the dominant moral narrative for thinking about world affairs.” At the same time, rights remain controversial and contested, and gaps in enforcement of human rights norms are conspicuous. This course examines the actors, organizations and ideas behind these developments, as well as the vast challenges we face today in attempting to enforce human rights norms globally. The course begins by examining the philosophical and political bases for the international human rights idea, probing the ongoing debate over universality, culture, and human rights. As part of this inquiry, we also examine the normative pillars of international human rights law. In the second part of the course, we will analyze various dimensions and challenges of human rights enforcement, including the main United Nations and regional human rights systems, prosecutions and transitional justice, the advocacy work of NGOs and human rights activists, and the new concept of the “responsibility to protect,” or R2P. In the final part of the semester, we will engage in a more in-depth examination of several distinct human rights issues, including torture and women’s rights. In all this, the course aims to provide students with knowledge of human rights at the level of intellectual theory and discourse, as well as a realm of concrete, “real world” action, controversy, and struggle.  The final exam will be held on Friday, August 1, 2014 at 9:00 am.

Note: Class meets M,T,W, TH & F from 11:05 am - 1:00 pm

International Negotiation - Barcelona (LWYB554)

Instructor(s): Allen Snyder

2 credit(s), H/P/L/F Graded
Requirement(s): Skills
Concentration(s): International Law, Study Abroad

Skills and theory of both competitive and cooperative international negotiating will be learned through simulation and experience. The final exam will be held on Thursday, June 19, 2014. (Program dates: May 26-June 20, 2014)

Note: Class meets M,T,W,Th & F - 9:00-10:50am