Information Technology Services

Drop Shadow

Frequently Asked Questions

Will my students stop coming to class if I record my lectures?

Why do I want to podcast?

How do I get started?

What types of files are acceptable for podcasting?

How can I get help with video podcasts?

Should I keep a copy of my own files after I upload them?

Can I podcast Copyrighted materials?

What is iTunes? What is iTunes U? How do I get iTunes?

What's the difference between using the USD Podcasting Server and USD iTunes U?

What's the difference between Public and Private in iTunes U?

How do USD faculty, staff and students log-in to see USD only materials on iTunes U?

Will my students need to pay for podcasts on iTunes U?

How do faculty members get space on iTunes U?

What's the difference between Get Tracks and Subscribe on iTunes U?

Can devices other than an iPod/iPhone be used with iTunes U?

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Will my students stop coming to class if I record my lectures?

ATS recently conducted a survey with over 50 respondents. 74% of students said they would not stop coming to class' that they view podcasted lectures as supplements to coming to class, reporting that they sometimes miss things that are said especially when taking notes. You may be unsurprised to hear that 97% of students surveyed would like their professors to podcast. It is also worth mentioning here that lecture podcasts are only the tip of the iceberg. Interviews with external experts or industry, supplementary lectures and information are all additional uses of podcasting.

Why do I want to podcast?

As mentioned above, 97% of students surveyed already have expressed a strong desire for their professors to podcast, reporting that 'this would help me learn'. Lectures are certainly not the only use of podcasting. There are dozens of other uses such as interviews with external experts or industry, supplementary discussions and information on troublesome concepts, language listening and speaking practice and much more. Additionally, professors need say something once and direct students to it rather than repeating the same explanation many times over. With iTunes U, professors can direct students to their own podcasts, but also to the millions of free podcasts on their subjects available in now.

How do I get started?

Easy!

What types of files are acceptable for podcasting?

Mp3 format for audio files

Mp4 for video files

PDF for text files

How can I get help with video podcasts?

Contact Instructional Media Services (IMS) for assistance with video production and editing.

Should I keep a copy of my own files after I upload them?

Absolutely. The chances of something happening to the podcasting server or to iTunes U are slim, but it is always good practice to keep a back-up of your podcast files.

Can I podcast Copyrighted materials?

It depends. You must first get permission for the original creator first and keep a record of this permission. Permissions vary rom publisher to publisher. Visit the Quick Links section of this site for more details.

What is iTunes? What is iTunes U?

iTunes is a free application from Apple that can be used with Mac or PC. It plays all your digital music and video on your computer. It can sync content to your iPod, or iPhone. It is not a web site, but can access the web. It is a software application (among others known as podcatchers) that can automatically identify and download new files associated with the podcasts and/or play and manage directly downloaded video, audio or pdf files.

Within iTunes is the iTunes Store, accessed via the web, where users can listen to/watch samples of music, videos, movies and purchase them. There are also many free podcasts users can subscribe to. Within the iTunes Store, is iTunes University where many of the worlds major educational institutions have there content. While many of the files in the iTunes Store are for purchase, the files in iTunes U are free.

For more information: visit About Apple iTunes | Watch a Video Overview | Download iTunes

What's the difference between using the USD Podcasting Server and USD iTunes U?

Both are places to house your recordings, but iTunes U allows you to house, organize and play podcasts and files. The USD Podcasting Server simply houses them. However, with the server option, you can link your casts to CE and other web sites easily. As well, professors have instant access (once the open an account) to uploading and linking with the server. For more details see the Publish section of this site.

What's the difference between Public and Private in iTunes U?

Public access means that anyone in the world with an Internet connection and Apple iTunes can see the materials. Private means you must be USD faculty, staff or students to see it. Materials can be designated as 'Private' during upload, requiring a USD log-in to view them.

Diagram

How do USD faculty, staff and students log-in to see USD only materials?

To see the private-to-USD-only content, you must log in to iTunes U through a web interface using your USD user name and password. After you log-in, iTunes should open automatically, provided you have it installed on your computer. [Download iTunes Here]

How do faculty get space on iTunes U?

You can request this through your department Content Approver. See the iTunes U publishing option for details.

Will my students need to pay for podcasts on iTunes U?

No. Everything appearing in USD iTunes U is free to access.

What's the difference between Get Tracks and Subscribe?

In iTunes U, users are given an option to Get Tracks or to Subscribe. When users click Get Tracks, they download only the tracks currently listed in the album. If anything new is added to the album later, they must manually download it. If the user had clicked Subscribe, the current list of tracks is downloaded and anything new that is added later will automatically be downloaded. This is what distinguishes a 'podcast' from a simple downloadable file.

Can devices other than an iPod/iPhone be used with iTunes U?

Not at this time, although it is rumored that other devices will be useable soon. The UK's Daily Telegraph has reported that it was announced at Mac World 2009 that this will be changing soon. (read the article) To work around this, files in iTunes can be burned to a cd and then placed on other devices or converted to mp3 (as opposed to Apple's own AAC). A Google search will render the instructions you'll need.

Request a FAQ

Have a question that is not on here? Please let us know. Send you question to itunes@sandiego.edu