Inside USD

Dresser on Mexico’s Next Chapter

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

The Trans-Border Institute (TBI) at the University of San Diego is hosting Dr. Denise Dresser as part of the annual Sister Sally Furay Lecture.

Dr. Dresser has been named one of the 300 most influential people in Mexico by the magazine Líderes Mexicanos. She is an award-winning journalist, scholar and one of Mexico’s most renowned political commentators. Dr. Dresser will comment on Mexico’s 2012 presidential elections, candidates and their campaign dynamics as well as the implications of a PRI win, in the context of the country’s “war on drugs.” She will also address the structural factors that have made democratic consolidation and economic reforms difficult to carry out, turning Mexico into a country that seems condemned to sub-par economic performance.

TBI’s Director David Shirk said, “Denise Dresser is arguably one of the most prominent and outspoken women in Mexican politics, and has taken on some of the most powerful interests in Mexico. From her very public clashes with Carlos Slim (the world’s richest man) to her most recent criticisms of Elba Ester Gordillo (the de facto head of Mexico’s powerful teacher’s union), Denise has been a fiery advocate for transparency, democracy, and justice in Mexico. Sometimes controversial but always a keen and eloquent observer, Denise Dresser is an excellent addition to our annual Sister Sally Furay speaker series, and will be of great interest to our students and the greater San Diego-Tijuana community.”

In her talk, Dr. Dresser will address the challenges Mexico is facing with this year’s presidential election, in which the return of the former ruling party, the PRI, may return to power. Dresser’s talk will examine the reasons that explain the “Putinization” of Mexico: the possibility of political regression due to the lack of substantive change over the last twelve years of National Action Party (PAN) rule.

The presentation will also focus on the main presidential candidates and their campaign dynamics, as well as the implications of a PRI win in the context of the country’s “war on drugs.” Key to understanding are the structural factors that have made democratic consolidation and economic reforms difficult to carry out, turning Mexico into a country that seems condemned to sub-par economic performance.

The lecture will be held in the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace & Justice Theater from 7 – 8:30 p.m. The lecture is free and open to the public.

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