The Substance of Civilization: Materials and Human History from the Stone Age to the Age of Silicon

This event occurred in the past

Date and Time

  • Thursday, February 12, 2015 from 12:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.

Location

Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice, D

5998 Alcala Park San Diego, CA 92110

Cost

0

Details

Dear USD Faculty, Staff, and Students,

How are engineering and history related? On Thursday, February 12, we are proud to host the following interdisciplinary presentation:

The Substance of Civilization: Materials and Human History from the Stone Age to the Age of Silicon
Thursday, Feb. 12 from 12:15 – 2:15 p.m.
KIPJ, Room D
Presented by: Stephen L. Sass - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University
Lunch will be provided, please RSVP by Tuesday, February 10

Materials enabled revolutionary advances in how we live, work, fight and travel, hence the naming of eras after them -- Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages. This talk explores the role of materials in the development of modern industrial civilizations by putting technology into an historical and human context, examining the advances made possible by innovations with materials. Connections between critical developments and events are identified. Materials as revolutionary, and frequently disruptive, agents of change will be emphasized. Finally, it will be pointed out that throughout history, shortages have driven innovation, implying that the solutions to the shortages we face today may lead to developments that we cannot even imagine. Beautiful artifacts of clay, bronze, gold and glass illustrate the lecture.

About Stephen L. Sass: Stephen L. Sass is Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University. A Fellow of the American Physical Society and ASM International, Dr. Sass was honored for “breakthrough studies of grain-boundary structures using the Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source, his efforts to bring knowledge of materials science and engineering to a broad audience through teaching and authorship of The Substance of Civilization, and his success at nucleating the careers of students who have gone onto successful and distinguished academic careers of their own.” Has 180 technical papers and 3 patents. The Substance of Civilization: Materials and Human History from the Stone Age to the Age of Silicon was written to make science and technology accessible to non-scientists, by putting them into an historical context.

Hope to see you there!

Chell Roberts, Dean, Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering
Noelle Norton, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences

Presented by the Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Educational Excellence