Academic Course Catalogs

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Engineering Department

Kathleen A. Kramer, PhD, Director

Electrical Engineering Program
Susan M. Lord, PhD, Coordinator
Ernest M. Kim, PhD, PE
Kathleen A. Kramer, PhD
Mikaya L. D. Lumori, PhD
Michael S. Morse, PhD, JD
Thomas F. Schubert, Jr., PhD, PE

Industrial and Systems Engineering Program
Leonard A. Perry, PhD, Coordinator
Bradley Chase, PhD, MPH
Truc Ngo, PhD
Rick T. Olson, PhD

Mechanical Engineering Program
Ming Z. Huang, PhD, PE, Coordinator
Frank G. Jacobitz, PhD
James G. Kohl, PhD
David M. Malicky, PhD
Matthew T. McGarry, PhD

Vision

University of San Diego Engineering is nationally recognized for developing world class engineers empowered to become leaders with global perspective and social awareness.

Mission

University of San Diego engineering is distinguished by student-centered education that emphasizes modern engineering skills and development of the whole person.  We are dedicated to innovative teaching, meaningful scholarship, and compassionate service.

The USD engineering programs are crafted to meet the traditions of USD for quality undergraduate education, the need for a more broadly-educated engineer capable of meeting the future demands and challenges of changing technology in a global economy and society, and the curriculum requirements for professional accreditation.

The Programs are nine-semester, integrated programs of study leading to a Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts (BS/BA) dual degree in a specified field of engineering. In addition to a sound preparation in engineering science, design, and professional practice, the curricula address written and oral communication, human values and relations, and ethics.

Unique Features

The USD engineering programs are undergraduate programs culminating in a unique dual BS/BA degree that is a consequence of the combination of intensive technical education and the USD emphasis on a broad liberal education. Each engineering program has breadth and depth in the engineering discipline, including an extensive laboratory component in outstanding laboratory facilities dedicated to undergraduate instruction. USD engineering students can expect a personalized education in small classes with a curriculum that emphasizes preparation for work in industry and the development of professionalism and values.

Professional Accreditation

Each of the three undergraduate majors in engineering has been accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), the recognized accreditor of college and university programs in engineering. ABET accreditation demonstrates the engineering programs’ commitment to providing its students with a quality education. USD is committed to achieving and maintaining professional accreditation to cover all engineering graduates. The electrical engineering program, the industrial and systems engineering program, and the mechanical engineering program have each achieved this goal and have been accredited since 1992, 2001, and 2008, respectively.

Academic Advising

All engineering students are assigned an engineering faculty advisor who tracks the student’s progress toward attaining an engineering degree. The advisor and student work together to ensure that the student is making satisfactory progress toward graduation. Freshmen are assigned an engineering advisor only if they enroll in the Engineering 101 Preceptorial during their first semester. Transfer students are initially advised by the Director of Engineering or the coordinator of the appropriate program and then assigned a permanent engineering advisor.

Recommended Prior Preparation

To complete an engineering program following a standard pattern, incoming freshmen should be prepared to enroll in calculus, English composition and literature, and a third level foreign language competency. Background deficiencies in any of the above areas may be removed at USD, but this will increase the minimum requirements for graduation in an engineering major.

Transfer students and other students seriously considering an engineering major are encouraged to contact the Department of Engineering to receive academic advising at the earliest opportunity. The first two years of the engineering programs at USD are closely coordinated with those of many community colleges and state universities in California, making it possible to transfer from such institutions to USD with minimal disruption. While the Engineering Programs are designed to be completed in nine semesters, students may be able to complete engineering degree requirements in four years with a combination of prior preparation, AP credit, and Intersession or summer study.

Special Restrictions on the Use of the Pass / Fail Option

For engineering majors, the pass/fail option is not permitted in any course required by specific course prefix and title in the appropriate required program of study. With the foregoing exceptions, the general university pass/fail regulations apply. See the description of the pass/fail option earlier in this bulletin.

Special Program Pattern for NROTC, ROTC, and AFROTC Students

NROTC, ROTC, and AFROTC requirements add 18 to 21 units to the standard program for Engineering majors. To meet the needs of the involved officer training corps and the major, a special program pattern has been constructed utilizing Intersession and Summer Session. One aspect of the pattern is the substitution of an approved NROTC, ROTC, or AFROTC course for the engineering requirement of a course in communications. The NROTC scholarship covers the full engineering program. However, benefits beyond four years must be requested through the naval science department.

Engineering Advisory Board

The purpose of the Engineering Advisory Board is to help the engineering programs form plans and implement strategies for growth that serve the San Diego technical community while the programs serve the mission of the university. The current board draws its membership from among highly placed leaders in the technical community across several important industries, including telecommunications, energy, aerospace & defense, biotechnology, and semiconductor electronics. Since 1994, the Engineering Advisory Board has helped USD engineering to form plans and implement strategies in the following areas: 1) long-range planning for the continued development of engineering at USD; 2) development and promotion of cooperative programs and relations with industry and the San Diego community; 3) assisting in seeking sources of support for engineering and science programs and facilities; and 4) advising the USD engineering faculty and administration on issues related to the growth and evolution of the engineering program.

engineering lower

Bachelor of Science / Bachelor of Arts Dual Degree Program in Electrical Engineering

Electrical engineering [A professional program accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)]

Electrical engineering is a profession that uses science, mathematics, computers and other technology, coupled with problem solving skills, to design, construct, and maintain products, services, and systems using electricity and electronics. Electrical engineers research, design, develop, and operate the many electrical systems and components that run our world. Electrical engineers are often associated with computer chips, power generation, or telecommunications. However, electrical engineers also specialize in such work as circuit design, computers and automatic control systems, microelectronics, electronic photography and television, energy sources and systems, and solid-state materials and devices. Electrical engineers work in the communications, aerospace, computer, electrical power, medical, semiconductor, and consumer electronics industries. Electrical engineering is a field with diverse challenges and many opportunities.

The EE program at USD encompasses a breadth of traditional fields and provides depth in electronics, signal analysis, and digital systems. In addition, students complete the broad range of core curriculum requirements that lead to a unique dual BS/BA degree in electrical engineering. Within the curriculum, special emphasis is placed upon engineering design and the use of the computer both as an engineering tool and as an integral component in systems. Both emphases are integrated throughout the curriculum with basic concepts introduced during the first two years followed by increasing levels of application complexity throughout the upper-division courses.

The educational objectives of the USD electrical engineering program are to develop graduates who:

  • are able to apply their electrical engineering and broad academic backgrounds in their professional and personal endeavors
  • can adapt to evolving job responsibilities
  • can contribute effectively on a team and provide leadership in their professional careers
  • Fast-changing technologies in the field of electrical engineering mean that life-long learning is a necessity for members of the profession. The significance of electrical engineering technologies in affecting the quality of life throughout the world creates additional professional responsibilities. As part of these professional obligations, all EE majors are expected to maintain student membership in the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, Inc. (IEEE).

electrical engineering

Electrical Engineering Advisory Board

The Electrical Engineering Advisory Board (EEAB) was organized in Summer 2001 to represent the interests of the electrical engineering industry and alumni to the electrical engineering program. The board, composed of representatives from companies such as SAIC, General Atomics, ViaSat Inc., and SDGE, serves, serves to expand the level and role of industry affiliates in the continued development of the electrical engineering program and in the promotion of cooperative programs and relations with industry and the San Diego community.

Requirements for the EE Major: 144-147 semester units

The mathematics, science, and engineering courses listed below also satisfy the core curriculum requirements in mathematics competency, natural sciences, and upper-division writing.

Mathematics and Basic Science requirements (33-39 semester units):

Mathematics (21 units): MATH 150, 151, 250, 310, 311, 315 (or ISyE 330)
Physics (8-11 units): PHYS 270, 271, 272 (or MENG 260)
Chemistry (four units): CHEM 151, 151L
Life Science Elective (three units)
Engineering Core Requirements (19-28 units):

These courses include units in engineering science and design and other subject requirements in support of engineering practice: ELEC 201; ENGR 101, 102, 121 (or COMP 150), 311; ISyE 220 (or ECON 101), 330 (or MATH 315); MENG 210, 260 (or PHYS 272).

Electrical / Electronics Engineering Requirements (47 units):

These courses include units in electrical engineering science and design. There are eleven required courses: ELEC 301, 302, 310, 320, 340, 350, 430, 460, 470, 491W, and 492, and six units of approved electives (including at least two 3 or 4 unit courses). Approved electives include ELEC 410, 432, 450, 456, 472, 480, and 494, and COMP 340, 375, and 380. New elective offerings are often made available; a complete list of approved electives can be obtained from the coordinator of electrical engineering.

Core Curriculum Requirements (39 units):

All electrical engineering majors must satisfy the core curriculum specified by the university. In addition to categories covered under the major requirements above, the electrical engineering program also requires the following specific courses: engineering ethics (PHIL 342), communications (COMM 103 or NAVS 201 for students in NROTC, MILS 301 for students in ROTC, or AS 300A for students in AFROTC) and economics (ECON 101 or ISyE 220).

Available Minors

The electrical engineering standard pattern qualifies students for a minor in mathematics without any additional courses. Interested majors should apply to the mathematics department for specific approval of the minor. Minors are possible in other areas, particularly computer science, but also physics, business administration, etc., by the addition of courses not included in the engineering standard patterns. The interested student should consult this bulletin or the specific department for guidance, as well as an engineering advisor for career-oriented advice.

Bachelor of Science / Bachelor of Arts Dual Degree Program in Industrial and Systems Engineering

Industrial and Systems Engineering [A professional program accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)].

Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) applies basic engineering skills from mathematics and the physical sciences, specialized analysis techniques, and an understanding of how people interact with machines and each other to design and evaluate the performance of systems in industry and in the service sector. Examples of the types of systems that may be analyzed by ISyEs include health care delivery systems, product distribution systems, and manufacturing systems. The factor that most distinguishes ISyE from other engineering disciplines is the attention devoted to human involvement in the systems being analyzed.

Educational Objectives

The ISyE program seeks to develop graduates who:

  • have established careers in industrial and systems engineering in industry, service, consulting, or government organizations
  • design, develop, implement and improve integrated industrial and service systems to achieve organizational goals
  • collaborate with others as members or leaders of engineering or multidisciplinary teams
  • continue to develop skills in engineering, business, management, or other industrial and systems engineering related fields.

To achieve these objectives coursework in the ISyE program emphasizes the process of developing analytical models for real-world systems and using computer-based techniques to explore ways in which the systems can be made to function more efficiently. The upper-division ISyE courses emphasize the general principles of designing and evaluating systems and the application of these principles to many different types of systems. Because the analysis of systems frequently requires an understanding of topics from the field of business administration, the ISyE program appropriately draws upon the expertise of the faculty in the School of Business Administration.

The ISyE major student is expected to be involved in professional aspects of the field. Since the engineering profession places a high value on professional society involvement, students enrolled in the industrial and systems engineering major are expected to be active student members of the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE).

Requirements for the ISyE Major: 147 semester units

The mathematics, science, and engineering courses listed below also satisfy the core curriculum requirements in mathematics competency, natural sciences, and the upper-division writing course.

Mathematics and Basic Science requirements (30-33 semester units):

Mathematics (15 units): MATH 150, 151, 250, 310 or 320;
Physics (8-11 units): PHYS 270, 271, 272 (or MENG 260)
Chemistry (four units): CHEM 151, 151L
Life Science Elective (three units)

Engineering Core Requirements (29-32 units):

These courses include units in engineering science and other subject requirements in support of engineering practice: ELEC 200 or 201; ENGR 101, 102, 121, 311; ISyE 220, 330, 350; MENG 210, MENG 260.

Industrial and Systems Engineering Requirements (46 units):

These courses include units in ISyE science and design. There are ten required ISyE courses: ISyE 310, 320, 335, 340, 391W, 420, 430, 460, 470, and 492. Students also select fourteen units of ISyE program electives, to include at least one lab course, approved by the student’s advisor. Nine units of these electives must be engineering courses. Approved engineering electives include ISyE 410, 440, 450, and 494 (Special Topics).

Core Curriculum Requirements (39 units):

All ISyE majors must satisfy the core curriculum specified by the university. In addition to categories covered under the ISyE major requirements below, the ISyE program requires the following specific core curriculum courses: engineering ethics (PHIL 342), and communications (COMM 103 or NAVS 201 for students in NROTC, MILS 301 for students in ROTC, or AS 300A for students in AFROTC).

Bachelor of Science / Bachelor of Arts Dual Degree Program in Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering [A professional program accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)].

Mechanical engineering is a profession that applies the principles of mathematics, science and engineering for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. Mechanical engineers research, develop, design, and manufacture engines, machines, and other mechanical devices for the benefit of society. They work on power-producing machines such as automobile and jet engines. They also develop power-using machines such as air-conditioners, robots, machine tools, and manufacturing equipment. Mechanical engineers are also at the forefront of newly developed technologies such as bioengineering, nanoengineering, environmental engineering, and renewable energy. Our mechanical engineering curriculum includes study in the following areas:

Thermal sciences, including thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer with applications in the efficient conversion of energy that allows the development of commercial power plants, environmentally friendly lawn mower engines, and cryogenic medical devices used to treat cancer.

Mechanics and materials, including the analysis of machine elements, materials, and dynamics to improve products such as artificial knees, automobile suspensions, and space vehicles.

Design and manufacturing, including application of manufacturing processes and integration of engineering fundamentals from the thermal science, mechanics and materials areas in analysis and synthesis of mechanisms and machinery.

The USD mechanical engineering curriculum is broad-based, hands-on, and design-oriented. We emphasize a student-centered education in small classes with a liberal arts foundation. The first two years of study are substantially the same as for the electrical engineering and industrial and systems engineering programs. The mechanical engineering dual BS/BA Program includes 144-147 units and has a standard course pattern with nine semesters. While the curriculum is designed to be completed in nine semesters, students may be able to complete the program in four years with a combination of prior preparation, AP credit, and summer study. An extensive laboratory component supports and complements theory and practice.

The mechanical engineering program prepares program graduates to work for small or large companies in most industries throughout Southern California, the United States, and internationally. Graduates may work in most industries, including aerospace, automotive, bioengineering, environmental, product design and manufacturing industries. The program also prepares graduates for a career in government, to enter graduate school in an area related to mechanical engineering, as well as to pursue a professional degree, for example in business, law, or medicine. Student will be qualified to take the fundamentals of engineering exam as the first step toward professional registration.

Students majoring in mechanical engineering are expected to advance the integrity, honor, and dignity of their chosen profession. As part of these professional obligations, all ME majors are encouraged to maintain student membership in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

Educational Objectives

The mechanical engineering program seeks to develop graduates who are able to:

  • apply their mechanical engineering and broad academic backgrounds in their professional and personal endeavors
  • adapt to evolving job responsibilities
  • communicate effectively
  • contribute and provide leadership in a team environment.

Mechanical Engineering Advisory Board

The Mechanical Engineering Advisory Board was established in 2005 with members representing current students, alumni, parents, higher education, and local industries. The board, composed of representatives from companies including Hamilton-Sunstrand, Zimmer Dental, Asymtek, Hewlett-Packard, Trane, and others, contributes to the on-going development of the mechanical engineering program, and provides mentorship and internship opportunities to our students.

mechanical engineering

Requirements for the Mechanical Engineering Major: (144-147 semester units)

The mathematics, science, and engineering courses listed below also satisfy the core curriculum requirements in mathematics competency, natural sciences, and the upper-division writing course.

Mathematics and Basic Science requirements (30-33 semester units):
Mathematics (18 units): MATH 150, 151, 250, 310, and MATH 315 (or ISyE 330)
Physics (eight units): PHYS 270 and 271
Chemistry (four units): CHEM 151, 151L
Life Science Elective (three units)

Engineering Core Requirements (26-32 units):

These courses include units in engineering science, computer programming, engineering design, and other subject requirements in support of engineering practice: ENGR 101, 102, 121, 311; ISyE 220 (or ECON 101), 330 (or MATH 315); MENG 210, 260, 350 (also listed as ISyE 350); ELEC 200 or 201.

Mechanical Engineering Requirements (46 units):

These courses include units in mechanical engineering science, laboratory, and design. There are twelve required courses: MENG 300, 351, 360, 370, 375, 380, 400, 420, 430, 460, 491W, and 492. Students also select two additional mechanical engineering elective courses. A list of approved mechanical engineering electives is available from the coordinator of mechanical engineering.

Core Curriculum Requirements (39 units):

All mechanical engineering majors must satisfy the core curriculum specified by the university. In addition to categories covered under the major requirements above, the mechanical engineering program requires the following specific courses: engineering ethics (PHIL 342), communications (COMM 103 or NAVS 201 for students in NROTC, MILS 301 for students in ROTC, or AS 300A for students in AFROTC) and economics (ECON 101 or ISyE 220).