Academic Course Catalogs

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School of Business Administration Courses

ACCT 201 Principles of Financial Accounting (3)
Introduction to accounting records, their purpose and use, emphasizing the establishment of a solid conceptual background. Accounting procedures for specific asset, liability, and owner’s equity accounts are also examined from the point of view of users of financial statements. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ACCT 202 Principles of Managerial Accounting (3)
Introduction of managerial accounting information for planning, controlling, and making decisions within a firm. Current changes to the business environment and their impact on accounting is also presented. Prerequisites: ACCT 201 and ITMG 100 (or concurrent enrollment).

ACCT 300 Intermediate Accounting I (3)
Emphasis is placed upon corporate organization with a comprehensive study of current assets; property, plant, and equipment; intangible assets; and current liabilities. Recent developments in accounting theory and their impact on financial reporting are illustrated. Prerequisite: ACCT 202.

ACCT 301 Intermediate Accounting II (3)
Extension of Intermediate Accounting I. Topics covered include long-term liabilities, pensions, leases, deferred taxes, and owners’ equity issues. Prerequisite: ACCT 300.

ACCT 302 Cost Accounting (3)
Sources of data and preparation of financial statements in manufacturing organizations are studied. Primary emphasis is on costs for control, decision processes internal to the firm (including standards of performance), relevant costs for decisions, budgets, and capital investment considerations. Prerequisite: ACCT 202.

ACCT 303 Accounting Information Systems (3)
Information requirements and transaction processing procedures relevant to integrated accounting systems. The course emphasizes accounting system design, analysis, and related internal controls. Prerequisites: ACCT 300 and 302.

ACCT 306 Federal Tax Accounting I (3)
Students will learn the fundamentals of federal income tax law from both a theory and practice perspective. Research projects and sample tax returns are used to illustrate course material. This course is designed for anyone needing a background in tax practice, or who would like to take a more active role in their own individual tax planning. Although the course is designed for Business and Accounting majors, upper-division students from outside the School of Business Administration are welcome and are encouraged to consult with the instructor for permission to take the course. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing and ACCT 201 (or permission of instructor).

ACCT 401 Advanced Accounting (3)
Accounting and reporting for business combinations, foreign currency transactions, partnerships, and not-for-profit organizations such as governments, charities, universities, and hospitals. Prerequisite: ACCT 301 (or concurrent enrollment).

ACCT 407 Federal Tax Accounting II (3)
Study of special tax considerations pertaining to corporations and partnerships. Practice tax returns are used to illustrate the course material. Prerequisites: ACCT 300 and 306.

ACCT 408 Auditing (3)
Intensive introduction to the attest function in society today. The environment, the process, and the report of the public auditor are analyzed. Potential extensions of the attest function are examined. Prerequisites: ACCT 301 and 303.

ACCT 494 Special Topics (3)
Topics of current interest in accounting. Course content and structure will differ depending on instructor. Consult your advisor for course description for any given semester. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ACCT 498 Internship (3)
Experiential learning working in a business, government, or nonprofit organization. Placements provide the opportunity for practical application of accounting, business, and economics principles. Placement must emphasize accounting field. See schedule of classes for special meeting times. This course may not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Senior Accounting majors only; junior Accounting majors with 75 units and senior Accounting minors with consent of instructor.

ACCT 499 Independent Study (1-3)
Independent study including empirical research and written reports. A maximum of three units of independent study may be used to satisfy requirements for the major. Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

Business Courses (BUSN)

BUSN 361 Introduction to International Business (3)
An introduction to the international dimension of doing business. The purpose of this course is to make the student aware of the role played by culture, geography, government, and economics in shaping the environment in which businesses operate internationally. Topics include forward currency markets, foreign direct investment, negotiation, international distribution, etc.

BUSN 377 Negotiation (3)
An introduction to the process of fair and business-like bargaining between parties with interdependent needs. Experience is gained in the use of both adversarial and integrative negotiating principles and techniques. The role of mediators is explored, and some of the issues involved in cross-cultural negotiations are examined.

BUSN 498 Internship (3)
Experiential learning working in a business, government, or nonprofit organization. Placements provide the opportunity for practical application of business, economics, and accounting principles. See schedule of classes for special meeting times. This course may not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: senior business, accounting, or economics majors only; junior business administration, business economics, accounting, or economics majors with 75 units; and senior business administration, accounting, or economics minors with consent of instructor.

Decision Science Courses (DSCI)

DSCI 300 Management Science (3)
An introduction to model formulation and solution techniques emphasizing their applications in decision making. Topics may include linear programming, transportation and assignment models, Markov analysis, network analysis, PERT/CPM methods, queuing models, and decision analysis. Prerequisite: ECON 216.

DSCI 303 Operations Management (3)
An introductory analysis of operations, planning, control, and improvement in services and manufacturing industries. Topics may include forecasting, process design, scheduling, inventories, JIT, productivity measurement, quality management, and learning curves. Prerequisite: ECON 216.

DSCI 494 Special Topics (3)
Topics of current interest in business administration. Course content and structure will differ depending on instructor. Consult your advisor for course description for any given semester. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

DSCI 499 Independent Study (1-3)
Independent study including empirical research and written reports. A maximum of three units of independent study may be used to satisfy requirements for the major. Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor

Economics Courses (ECON)

ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
An introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, an introduction to market structure, and the workings of input markets.

ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
The study of the operation of the American economy in an international setting, examining the interaction of households, business firms, government, and the rest of the world in resource, product, and financial markets. Topics include national income accounting and analysis, business fluctuations, inflation, unemployment, and monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 201 Intermediate Microeconomics (3)
The economic theory of demand, production, product and input markets, welfare, and general equilibrium. Applications of price theory, including its use in evaluating and forming public policy. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 202 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3)
Examines the causes of fluctuations in important national economic variables, such as aggregate output, interest rates, the rate of inflation, the rate of unemployment, and exchange rates. Investigates the feasibility of stabilizing the economy through the use of fiscal and monetary policy. Prerequisite: ECON 102.

ECON 216 Statistics for Business and Economics (4)
A systematic exposure to the issues and problems of applying and interpreting statistical analyses of business situations. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, random variables and their distributions, statistical inference, multiple regression and residual analysis, correlation, classical time-series models, and forecasting. Extensive computer analysis of data. Prerequisite: MATH 130 or 150.

ECON 302 Public Finance (3)
An introduction to public sector economics, concentrating on the revenues and expenditures of federal, state, and local governments. Topics include public goods, externalities, voting theory, cost benefit analysis, and the study of taxation and government transfer programs. Prerequisite: ECON 102.

ECON 304 Urban Economics (3)
The application of economic analysis to urban and regional areas. Topics include the theory underlying urbanization and the location of economic activity, the methodology utilized to analyze urban and regional economies, and problems and policies related to urban areas, such as housing, poverty, transportation, and local public finance. Special attention will be given to the San Diego metropolitan area. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 308 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (3)
An analysis of the economic principles that underlie the allocation, pricing, and use of natural resources. Topics include the intertemporal allocation of depletable resources, the economics of fisheries and forestry, issues in the distribution and use of water resources, the economics of recycling and waste disposal, and economic perspectives on global warming and ozone depletion. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 310 Money and Banking (3)
A study of the structure, regulation, and performance of the banking industry in the United States, focusing on the strategy and procedures of the Federal Reserve System. Examines the problems encountered by the Federal Reserve System in trying to achieve its goals. Prerequisite: ECON 102.

ECON 321 Women and Work (3)
Analysis of women’s market and nonmarket work activities. Topics include gender roles, allocation of time, occupational distribution, earnings, government programs and their impact by gender, and the role of women and work in other countries. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 322 Labor Economics (3)
An analysis of the operation of labor markets focusing on the market system for wage determination. Topics include the supply and demand for labor, wage determination under various market structures, human capital formation, discrimination in labor markets, collective bargaining and the structure of pay, unemployment, and wage inflation. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 324 Industrial Organization (3)
Examines the role of different industrial structures in the performance of industrial markets, including the influence of different structures on major competitive forces in the market: entry, threat of substitution, bargaining power of buyers, bargaining power of suppliers, and rivalry among current competitors. Develops competitive strategies in various industrial environments. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 327 Law and Economics (3)
The application of economic methodology to the principal areas of law: property, contracts, torts, and crime. The economic concepts of maximization, equilibrium, and efficiency are used to examine the consequences of existing and proposed laws and legal institutions. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 329 Real Estate Economics (3)
An analysis of the economic principles that underlie the market for real estate. Topics include an evaluation of land resource requirements, input-output analysis in land use, economic foundations of valuation of land and improvements, taxation issues in real estate, and land use policy. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 333 International Economics (3)
The theory, practice, and institutions of the international economy. Topics include international trade and investment, balance of payments, foreign exchange rate determination, multinational enterprises, trade with developing countries, and international economic policy. Prerequisite: ECON 102.

ECON 335 Economic Development of Latin America (3)
An analysis of the determinants of economic development and growth in Third World countries in general and Latin America in particular, along with associated problems and policies. Topics include theories and policies concerning population, income distribution, education, capital formation, finance, agriculture, industry, trade, and economic planning. Prerequisite: ECON 102.

ECON 337 Economic Development of Asia (3)
An analysis of the determinants of economic development and growth in Asia and the Pacific Rim, along with associated problems and policies. Topics include theories and policies concerning industry, agriculture, domestic savings and investment, human resources, international trade, foreign capital, and external debt. Prerequisite: ECON 102.

ECON 353 Sports Economics (3)
The application of economic principles to analyze a wide range of issues in professional sports and collegiate athletics. Principles from the economics of labor markets, industrial organization, and public finance are applied to the analysis of sports issues. Issues discussed include league formats, rival leagues, franchise relocation and venue location, player salaries, free agency, salary caps, arbitration, player development, discrimination, NCAA rules on scholarships and eligibility, financial aspects of collegiate athletic programs, revenues from merchandising and broadcast rights, and economic impact analysis of sports teams on a local community. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 370 Applied Econometrics (3)
The study of the construction and estimation of econometric models and econometric research. This is a project-oriented course designed to integrate economic theory with econometric analysis. Fall semester. Prerequisites: ECON 201, 202, and 216.

ECON 371 Business Cycles and Forecasting (3)
Examines the business cycle and techniques for forecasting fluctuations. The emphasis of the course is to gain hands-on exposure to specific business forecasting techniques and learn to apply them to limit the range of uncertainty in management decision making. Specific techniques covered include lead-lag, exponential smoothing, and econometric and arima (Box-Jenkins) time series analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 102 and 216.

ECON 373 Managerial Economics (3)
The application of analytical techniques and economic principles to analyze typical problems encountered by managers. Topics include risk analysis, demand analysis, sales forecasting, production analysis, cost estimation, pricing decisions, and capital budgeting. Prerequisites: ECON 102 and 216. Spring semester only.

ECON 380 Advanced Economic Theory (3)
An introduction to mathematical techniques used to analyze economic problems to gain a deeper understanding of economic decision making through the use of mathematical models. Topics include comparative statistics, optimization problems, dynamics, and mathematical programming. Mathematical techniques covered include matrix algebra, differential and integral calculus, differential equations, and difference equations. Prerequisites: ECON 102 and MATH 130 or 150.

ECON 490W Senior Seminar (3)
A course to enhance analytical and research skills in the field of economics. Students will develop individual research projects of their own interest, integrating relevant concepts from business and economics. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Spring semester only.

ECON 494 Special Topics (3)
Topics of current interest in economics. Course content and structure will differ depending on instructor. Consult your advisor for course description for any given semester. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: ECON 102 and consent of instructor.

ECON 498 Internship (3)
Experiential learning working in a business, government, or nonprofit organization. Placements provide the opportunity for practical application of economics, business, and accounting principles. Placement must emphasize economics field. See schedule of classes for special meeting times. This course may not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Senior Economics majors only; junior Economics majors with 75 units and senior Economics minors with consent of instructor.

ECON 499 Independent Study (3)
Study of economic theory and public policy through selective readings and research. A maximum of three units of independent study may be used to satisfy requirements for the major. Prerequisites: Economics or Business Economics major, senior standing, and consent of instructor.

Ethics and Law Courses (ETLW)

ETLW 302D Business and Society (3)
This course examines principles of social responsibility, ethics, law, and stakeholder theory as they apply to organizations domestically and abroad. Coverage includes business ethics; individual versus societal interests; labor and employment issues; consumer protection; discrimination and diversity; the natural environment; politics, public policy, and government regulation of business. Particular attention is given to developing moral reasoning skills. Meets the requirements for the Environmental Studies minor. Prerequisite: MGMT 300.

ETLW 311 Business Law I (3)
Covers the fundamentals of United States law and legal system, relationship of law to ethics, criminal law, torts, contracts, agency, risk management, insurance, and hiring and managing an attorney. Special emphasis is given to preventing legal problems and resolving conflicts in business for business practitioners. Systems and methods of dispute resolution are considered, including negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and the U.S. judicial system, including small claims court.

ETLW 312 Business Law II (3)
Continued study of the legal environment of business, including such topics as creation, operation, and termination of partnerships and corporations, sale of goods, and negotiable instruments. Case study. Prerequisite: ETLW 311.

ETLW 313 International Business Law and Ethics (3)
Global issues permeate the business environment. As international business transactions increase, so does the need for an understanding of how international law governs such transactions. What does the international legal system look like? What international institutions come into play and what is their role? What law applies and how is it enforced? How do businesses conduct themselves in the global marketplace, and how should they? This course will explore these issues and more, including various ways in which ethical, cultural, and political forces influence international business. Teaching methods include lecture, case studies, class discussion and debate.

ETLW 403 Environmental Management (3)
This course analyzes the effect of business activities on the environment. Environmental public policies are examined, as well as selected corporate environmental policies. The course addresses a myriad of questions, such as: Is there an inherent conflict between business profits and environmental protection? Can humans conduct business without harming the environment? What are the environmental consequences if the developing world reaches the same level of consumption as the developed world? Should the developed world reduce its level of consumption? Does the developed world have an obligation to the undeveloped world? If so, what is it? What is the meaning of sustainable economic growth? How is sustainable economic growth achieved? Meets the requirements for the Environmental Studies minor.

ETLW 494 Special Topics (3)
Topics of current interest in business administration. Course content and structure will differ depending on instructor. Consult your advisor for course description for any given semester. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ETLW 499 Independent Study (1-3)
Independent study including empirical research and written reports. A maximum of three units of independent study may be used to satisfy requirements for the major. Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

Finance Courses (FINA)

FINA 300 Financial Management (3)
This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles that guide the financial manager in making asset management, valuation and financing decisions. Topics include ratio analysis, time value of money, stock and bond valuation, risk and return (CAPM), capital budgeting, financial planning, cost of capital and options. Pre-requisites: ACCT 201, ECON 102, ECON 216

FINA 401 Commercial Bank Management (3)
This course examines operating and policy issues bankers face in their efforts to maximize shareholder value. Topics include evaluating bank performance, measuring and controlling risks, managing the loan portfolio, and liability and capital management. Recent industry trends and the interaction between financial institutions and the economy are studied. Prerequisite: FINA 300.

FINA 402 Investments (3)
This course surveys the basic principles and techniques of security and investment analysis. It covers capital markets, stocks, fixed-income portfolios, options, futures contracts and other derivatives. Market analysis methods are examined, and sources of analytical information and their use are studied. Prerequisite: FINA 300.

FINA 404 Advanced Corporate Finance (3)
The objective of this course is to apply financial management concepts to business situations through the use of case studies. The course will enhance your understanding of corporate finance topics, such as, valuation, capital budgeting, risk and return, cost of capital, capital structure, dividend policy and mergers. The focus of the course is on applied and analytical financial decision making and will require written case reports and the presentation of case analyses. Prerequisite: FINA 300

FINA 405 International Financial Management (3)
An introduction to the problems facing the financial management of international companies. Topics include foreign exchange exposure management, financing trade, foreign direct investments, international accounting and control, and working capital management. Prerequisite: FINA 300.

FINA 406 Personal Finance (3)
This course will cover the financial planning, taxation and regulatory aspects of an individual’s lifelong saving, borrowing and investment decisions. The course will educate persons in making informed financial choices over their working careers. The topics include – credit management, credit scores, tax planning, consumer loans, home purchase and mortgage financing, property, life and health insurance, mutual funds, stock and bond investing, IRAs, 401k plans, retirement and estate planning. Prerequisite: FINA 300

FINA 407 New Venture Finance (3)
This course presents the fundamental process of funding a new venture. The course is centered on developing the critical skills of evaluating a start-up business idea, constructing a business plan to implement that idea, identifying an appropriate funding source, presenting the business idea to a funding source, and negotiating a funding term sheet. Prerequisite: FINA 300

FINA 408 Financial Statement Analysis (3)
This course develops a set of core skills essential to financial statement analysis. It covers strategic ratio analysis, cash flow analysis, pro forma financial statements, financial modeling and firm valuation using discounted cash flow and residual income models, with an emphasis on practical applications. Prerequisite: FINA 300

FINA 494 Special Topics (3)
Topics of current interest in Finance and capital markets. Course content and structure will differ depending on instructor. Consult your advisor for course description for any given semester. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

FINA 499 Independent Study (1-3)
Independent study including empirical research and written reports. A maximum of three units of independent study may be used to satisfy requirements for the major. Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

Information Technology Management Courses (ITMG)

ITMG 100 Information Systems (3)
An introduction to computer-based information systems and their role in business and other organizations. Topics include information technology, information systems and development concepts, and application software. Emphasis on improving student skills as knowledge workers through the effective use of business productivity software and the Internet. Instructional methods include lecture, case study, hands-on projects, and student presentations.

ITMG 310 Structured Programming for Business Applications (3)
The study of advanced methods and techniques in decision support application development using spreadsheet, database, and visual programming software. The course enables students to solve business problems by integrating tools including spreadsheets, database, programming languages, and the Internet. The course stresses development of complete, turnkey systems with programming facilities available in decision support software programs. Heavy emphasis is placed on logical processes and developing programming skills. Prerequisite: ITMG 100.

ITMG 320 Database Design and Implementation (3)
The theory and practice of designing, implementing, and modifying information systems that use database management software. Topics include: best practices in data modeling, data normalization, and database design; database implementation methods; and the use and evaluation of alternative database management software packages. Instructional methods include lecture, demonstrations, group problem-solving exercises, a major database design and implementation project, and student presentations. Prerequisite: ITMG 100.

ITMG 330 Electronic Commerce (3)
Overview of current practice in electronic commerce, broadly defined to include business processes and the activities of not-for-profit organizations. Includes discussion of enabling technologies and business strategies, and discussion of international, legal, and ethical issues that arise in conducting electronic business.

ITMG 340 Website Design (3)
Examines the design of websites for business and organizations. Topics include: planning a website, understanding the principles and elements of effective website design, using Web development and design tools; and evaluating website effectiveness. Elements of consistent Web page design as components of overall website design are emphasized. Effective communication of concepts and analysis in written format and oral presentations is stressed. Teaching methods include class lecture, case studies, and Internet laboratory research projects. Prerequisite: ITMG 100.

ITMG 350 Management Information Systems (3)
A management-oriented overview of information systems with an emphasis on ways to analyze and use information technologies from the perspective of a business professional. Topics include: international competitive uses of information systems; various ways of using information technologies in business processes, products, and services; impacts of information systems on the productivity of individuals and organizations; alternative methods for building information systems; factors leading to successful implementation of information systems; and threats and risks associated with information systems. Instructional methods include lecture, case study analysis, Internet-based projects, community service-learning, technical writing, and presentations. Prerequisite: ITMG 100.

ITMG 360 Data Communications and Networks (3)
Introduction to the concepts, technology, and business practices related to the design and functioning of modern data communication networks. Topics include: various protocols, topologies, and configurations used in modern data communications networks; the characteristics, engineering, and economic trade-offs among essential network hardware and software components; and current telecommunications industry standards and emerging technologies. Hands-on projects introduce students to the nuances of design, implementation, and management of computer networks in real-world environments using prevailing standard networking software. Prerequisite: ITMG 100.

ITMG 440 Internet Programming (Website Design II) (3)
Develops skills in the design and implementation of object-oriented information systems on distributed platforms. Topics include: object-oriented programming methods; development of distributed applications; and Web-based interface design and interactivity with enterprise-wide databases. Hands-on projects provide students experience with real-world software development environments using state-of-the-art development methodologies and tools. Prerequisites: ITMG 100.

ITMG 494 Special Topics (3)
Topics of current interest in information technology management. Course content and structure will differ depending on instructor. Consult your advisor for course description for any given semester. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ITMG 499 Independent Study (1-3 )
Independent study including empirical research and written reports. A maximum of three units of independent study may be used to satisfy requirements for the major. Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

Management Courses (MGMT)

MGMT 300 Organizational Behavior (3)
The study of human behavior in organizational settings. Examines the interface between human behavior and the organizational context, and presents frameworks for managing people in the organization. Topics addressed include perceptual processes, personality, learning, motivation, attitudes, stress, group dynamics, intergroup behavior, conflict, power, politics, leadership, and cross-cultural implications. Behavioral science concepts are applied through self-assessment, case studies, and experiential exercises.

MGMT 301 Organizational Theory (3)
An analysis of the theories of organizational design, structure, development, and effectiveness from a managerial perspective. Topics addressed in this macro-oriented course include: systems theory; analysis of organization environments and their impact on organizations; organizational purposes, goals, and planning; organizational decision-making processes; technology and alternative organizational designs; information and control systems; functions of management; job design; environment-organization interface; and international and contemporary management issues. A contingency-systems approach is emphasized through case studies and simulations. Prerequisite: MGMT 300.

MGMT 302 Family Business (3)
Family-owned businesses make up as much as 80 percent of all U.S. businesses, including 175 of the Fortune 500. They face different challenges than their non-family-owned peers. This course discusses ways in which family-owned businesses are unique, stressing some of the special challenges they face, such as: grooming a management successor from within the family; implementing an estate plan to pass ownership of the business to the proper individuals while avoiding our confiscatorial estate tax; techniques for resolving family conflicts that erupt in the business and business conflicts that threaten to destroy the family; setting fair compensation for family members and non-family employees; and motivating non-family employees to support the family’s goals. Family business is a cross-functional, multi-disciplinary study which includes aspects of management, communications and conflict resolution, law, estate planning, accounting and taxation, and family counseling.

MGMT 303 Interpersonal Relations (3)
An advanced course covering theories, research, and skill development in the area of interpersonal relations. Topics covered include interpersonal influence, conflict, emotional styles, communication, group roles, non-verbal behavior, and personal growth. Course concepts are integrated with classroom exercises and outside organizational experiences to provide the student with both knowledge and skills for interacting effectively with others in managerial and personal situations. Prerequisite: MGMT 300.

MGMT 304 Entrepreneurship and New Ventures (3)
An examination of the problems and processes for launching and/or purchasing business ventures. Topics include the nature and role of the entrepreneur, identifying and assessing potential opportunities for new ventures, structuring and staffing the new venture, preparing the business plan, attracting venture capital, and dealing with key legal issues. Prerequisites: FINA 300, MGMT 300, and MKTG 300.

MGMT 305 Career Development (3)
Study of the development of careers in work organizations. Principles of human resource skill development and patterns of success. Models for understanding individual and organizational career assessment and development. Principles of stress and coping mechanisms in career activities. Attention to successful individual and organizational practices. Particular emphasis on careers in management. Prerequisite: MGMT 300.

MGMT 306 Women in Management (3)
This course is designed to give women a repertoire of skills needed in various work-related situations. The course examines management requirements for various organizational levels and stresses the difference between personal and organizational issues.

MGMT 307 Human Resource Management (3)
An introduction to the roles of both the staff specialist and manager regarding the human resource management function. Topics include, but are not limited to, staffing, compensating, training, appraising, and developing an organization’s human resources, as well as employment law, labor relations, and the strategic role of human resource management in today’s organization. Prerequisite: MGMT 300.

MGMT 308 Small Business Management (3)
Application of the basic business disciplines to the small business environment. Examines both growth-oriented small firms on the way to becoming large firms and small, income-substitution firms. Issues include: managing to provide for the survival and growth of the small business; how smallness influences management processes such as recruitment and motivation of employees; and how smallness influences marketing, finance, operations, and other functional areas within the small firm. Prerequisites: FINA 300, MGMT 300, and MKTG 300.

MGMT 309 International Comparative Management (3)
Addresses the dilemmas and opportunities that managers face as they work in multicultural and global environments. The main objective of the course is to increase the effectiveness of managers/employees in identifying, understanding, and managing the cultural components of organizational dynamics. Focuses on the relationships between cultural values and the practice of managing people. Prerequisite: MGMT 300. (For International Business minors only, BUSN 361 may substitute MGMT 300 as the prerequisite for this course.)

MGMT 401W Business Communication (3)
Analysis of the factors involved in planning, organizing, and writing in the business environment. Extensive practice in presenting effective letters, memoranda, and business reports using primary and secondary sources. This course satisfies the USD requirement of an upper-division writing course.

MGMT 490 Strategic Management (3)
This course develops skills in problem analysis and decision making in areas of corporate strategy and business policy. It is the integrating course of the undergraduate program and will concentrate on the application of concepts through case studies. Open only to last-semester graduating seniors.

MGMT 492 Strategy Simulation (3)
Students will manage a company in a computer simulated oligopolistic industry. They will compete against companies managed by students from five other schools. Students will write detailed business plans, prepare budgets, and submit annual reports to shareholders while making management decisions for their company for 20 (simulated) quarters. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor after competitive evaluation.

MGMT 494 Special Topics (3)
Topics of current interest in business administration. Course content and structure will differ depending on instructor. Consult your advisor for course description for any given semester. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

MGMT 499 Independent Study (1-3)
Independent study including empirical research and written reports. A maximum of three units of independent study may be used to satisfy requirements for the major. Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

Marketing Courses (MKTG)

MKTG 300 Fundamentals of Marketing (3)
The objective of this course is to introduce students to the important issues undertaken by marketers within a socially responsible and ethical framework. The students will learn the marketing vocabulary and basic elements of a marketing analysis. Upon completion of the course they will have developed the knowledge necessary to prepare a well-thought-out marketing plans. Prerequisites: ECON 101.

MKTG 301 Services Marketing (3)
Examines the key characteristics that distinguish services from traditional goods marketing. Critical dimensions which customers utilize to determine quality services are emphasized. Attention is directed toward the development and demonstration of interpersonal and problem-solving skills. Learning activities can include: case analysis, marketing plan, and client-sponsored projects. Prerequisite: MKTG 300.

MKTG 302 Sports Marketing (3)
This course explores the complex and diverse nature of sports marketing. It applies fundamental marketing concepts to the sports industry, including the marketing mix, consumer behavior, marketing research, segmentation analysis, and assessment of marketing programs specific to sports. Guidelines for the formulation of marketing goals and strategies will be included. Trends, issues, and problems influencing the industry will also be examined. Prerequisite: MKTG 300.

MKTG 305 International Marketing (3)
The purpose of this course is to provide an up-to-date overview of international marketing. The principles of marketing will be augmented by additional exposure to the opportunities and problems facing marketing managers in the changing global marketplace. Special attention will be given to the management of cultural differences in product development, distribution systems, pricing, and marketing communication. Prerequisite: MKTG 300. (For International Business minors only, BUSN 361 may substitute MKTG 300 as the prerequisite for this course.)

MKTG 330 Personal Selling (3)
Examines the role of personal selling in a firm’s promotion and marketing strategy, and presents the principles and methods of persuasive communication. Concepts from the behavioral sciences are explored to show their application in sales situations. Attention is focused on the development and demonstration of effective sales presentation techniques. Prerequisite: MKTG 300.

MKTG 350 Advertising (3)
The role of advertising in society, business, and marketing. Human behavior, market selection, media planning, advertising appeals, preparation of copy, research decisions, and the campaign approach to advertising are covered. An advertising campaign is planned and developed as a requirement of the course. Prerequisite: MKTG 300.

MKTG 355 Public Relations (3)
This course is an introduction to public relations as a component of marketing communications. The strategic planning and tactical implementation of public relations for organizations will be covered including a review of public relations campaigns. Discussion of the effects of research, public opinion, ethics, and laws on public relations activities will be covered. Crisis communications will be included. Career opportunities with public relations firms will also be covered. Prerequisite: MKTG 300.

MKTG 410 Marketing Research (3)
Emphasis is placed on the relationship between marketing research and the business decision. A complete marketing research project is developed. Topics include: research methodology and the business function, problem formulation and the role of research, data collection, and analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 216 and MKTG 300.

MKTG 420 Consumer Behavior (3)
Analysis of consumer behavior and motivation, principles of learning, personality, perception, and group influence, with emphasis upon mass communications effects. Prerequisite: MKTG 300.

MKTG 465 Retailing (3)
Essentials of retail management; market segmentation and market research for retail operations; buying and pricing functions; inventory control and budgeting. Prerequisite: MKTG 300.

MKTG 480 Advanced Marketing Project (3)
This course offers the opportunity to implement the basic fundamentals of marketing through an experiential learning situation, simulation, case analysis, or combination of these. May involve interaction with business or other organizations in the execution of marketing strategy. This course may not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: MKTG 300.

MKTG 490 Marketing Strategy (3)
The capstone course for marketing majors. This course develops skills in analyzing practical marketing situations and the formulation and implementation of effective marketing strategies. Discussion of the relationship of the marketing process to the business function as a whole. Prerequisite: MKTG 300.

MKTG 494 Special Topics (3)
Topics of current interest in marketing. Course content and structure will differ depending on instructor. Consult your advisor for course description for any given semester. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

MKTG 499 Independent Study (1-3)
Independent study including empirical research and written reports. A maximum of three units of independent study may be used to satisfy requirements for the major. Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

Real Estate Courses (REAL)

REAL 320 Principles of Real Estate (3)
The study of the principles and practices surrounding real estate assets within the U.S. financial markets. Includes an investigation of urban economic forces on financing, investment, and valuation decisions, and legal effects on market efficiency. The ethical implications of real estate principles and practices will be emphasized. This course fulfills one of the requirements for both the Sales Agent and the Broker’s License issued by the California Department of Real Estate. Prerequisite: FINA 300.

REAL 325 Financing Residential Real Estate (3)
An overview course that explains with real-world examples how America’s residential real estate finance markets operate and interact with one another. Provides an understanding of how technology is rapidly changing borrowers’ ability to “shop” for mortgages and how lenders offer their products and services. Covers the entire array of mortgages available to consumers, where loans can be obtained, and what happens to loans after they are made. Places U.S. mortgage markets into a global context. The ethical dimensions of financing real estate will be brought to the forefront of classroom discussion. Prerequisite: FINA 300.

REAL 326 Commercial Real Estate Finance and Investment (3)
An introduction to the core principles and analytical tools useful for making investment and financing decisions regarding commercial real estate. The course reviews the fundamental financial concepts that are critical to real estate decision making; compares and contrasts different types of commercial real estate; discusses the techniques that are commonly used to determine the value of a commercial property; and introduces the various ways to finance real estate acquisitions. It also describes the roles of traditional sources of commercial real estate capital, as well as the proliferation of newer financial products. Prerequisite: FINA 300.

REAL 327 Legal Aspects of Real Estate (3)
The study of the historical, foundational, and fundamental legal principles involving both commercial and residential real estate. An exploration of issues, case studies, and current events in the area of real estate law and ethics in the real estate marketplace. Special emphasis is given to transactions, investments, and the development of real estate, as such relates to contracts, land use requirements, environmental concerns, and risk management matters. This course fulfills one of the requirements for the California Department of Real Estate Broker examination.

REAL 328 Commercial Real Estate Valuation (3)
An overview of real estate valuation techniques. The fundamentals of income capitalization, sales comparison and cost approaches to appraisal theory are discussed using practical examples. Through the use of commercial real estate software valuation tools (ARGUS Financial Analysis®), participants will gain the understanding of appraisal procedures used to analyze data and derive value estimates for every category of income-producing property. The importance of ethical judgment and industry standards will be emphasized along with the reconciliation process and preparation of the final appraisal report. Prerequisite: REAL 320.

REAL 329 Real Estate Development (3)
This course presents an overview of the real estate development process. Emphasis will be placed on how to evaluate and quantify risk, and how to assess it in light of the development opportunity. The course will help students develop the skills necessary for successful involvement in development at the entry, corporate and entrepreneurial level. Specific topics include land acquisition, due diligence, market analysis, the entitlement process, building design, construction, financing, leasing, management, and disposition. Cases will be used to reinforce and explain the various and often politically sensitive aspects of the real estate development process. Prerequisite: REAL 320.

REAL 494 Special Topics (3)
Topics of current interest in real estate. Course content and structure will differ depending on instructor. Consult your advisor for course description for any given semester. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

REAL 499 Independent Study (1-3)
Independent study including empirical research and written reports. A maximum of three units of independent study may be used to satisfy requirements for the major. Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

Supply Chain Management Courses (BSCM)

BCSM 300 Global Purchasing and Supply Management (3)
Emphasis on developing and maintaining successful supplier relationships in recognition of their critical importance to organizations. Systematic coverage of the process: strategic make vs. buy and outsourcing decisions; ethics and social responsibility; development of requirements; source selection; price determination and negotiation; quality management; supplier development; and relationship management. Combination of lectures, case studies and class discussions.

BCSM 302 Supply Chain Management (3)
Emphasis on the tactical and strategic decisions that match supply to demand. Topics covered include forecasting and evaluating customer demand, design and operation of distribution systems, and integration of operations and purchasing activities to deliver customer value. Overview of strategic supply chain design and the integration of internal and external partners. The roles of marketing, finance, engineering, purchasing and operations in the supply chain are examined. Combination of lecture, seminar, and case discussions.

BCSM 303 Strategic Cost Management (3)
This course introduces and provides students an opportunity to apply modern cost management concepts, principles, and techniques in the supply chain management setting. Topics covered include an overview of manufacturing costs and cost-volume-profit analysis, activity-based management and activity-based costing, risk/opportunity costs and contract compensation agreements, and performance measurement. Additional topics include Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) analysis, net present value/return on investment analyses, outsourcing/make or buy analysis, and financial statement analysis as it relates to sourcing decisions. Prerequisites: ACCT 202, ECON 101. BSCM 300 can be taken concurrently.

BCSM 494 Special Topics (3)
Topics of current interest in supply chain management. Course content and structure will differ depending on instructor. Consult your advisor for course description for any given semester. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

BCSM 499 Independent Study (1-3)
Independent study including empirical research and written reports. A maximum of three units of independent study may be used to satisfy requirements for the major. Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.