Academic Course Catalogs

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Languages and Literatures

Kevin Guerrieri, PhD, CHAIR
Íñigo A. Yanguas, PhD, LANGUAGE COORDINATOR
Santiago Rubio-Fernaz, PhD, DIRECTOR OF PLACEMENT

The Department of Languages and Literatures offers undergraduate studies in nine different languages with majors in French, Italian Studies, and Spanish; minors in French, German, Italian, and Spanish; and courses up to fourth-semester proficiency in Ancient Greek, Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, and Latin as well as some upper-division courses in these languages. In addition, the Department’s courses form a part of a number of interdisciplinary programs including Asian Studies, Classical Studies, Interdisciplinary Humanities, Latin American Studies, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and the Liberal Studies Program, among others. By its very nature, the Department contributes significantly to the internationalization of the curriculum and cultural diversity at USD.

Language study is a vital part of an education in the liberal arts. At the Lower-Division Level, the language programs are devised to enable students to acquire the basic structures and vocabulary necessary to communicate effectively in the target language in a variety of settings. Likewise students develop a greater awareness of other cultures, develop skills in intercultural communication, and gain direct access to additional bodies of knowledge. Ultimately, through their language studies, students will be better prepared to participate more fully and actively in the global community.

Upper-Division courses provide students with a foundation in the cultural history of the languages, peoples, and regions studied within their socio-political and economic contexts. These courses help students to develop skills in critical thinking, literary and cultural analysis, and clear and effective self-expression in both speaking and writing in the target languages. Students enhance their appreciation for and contribution to the level of inclusion and diversity in U.S. and international communities through cultural understanding and linguistic proficiency. Upon completion of the Department’s majors, students are well prepared to initiate graduate studies in language, literature, or other disciplines, or to become successful professionals in a number of different areas including international relations, law, health, business, and education, among many others.

Learning Goals and Outcomes for the Majors

Goal 1: Communicative Proficiency

LO 1: Recursive skills: Majors can communicate in the target language in the two basic “recursive skills,” reading and writing, at the Advanced-Low to Advanced-High level according to the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines.
LO 2: Immediacy skills: Majors can communicate in the target language in the two basic “immediacy skills,” listening and speaking, at the Advanced-Low to Advanced-High level according to the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines.

Goal 2: Intercultural Competence

LO 3: Diversity, inclusion, and social justice: Majors can identify and explain fundamental issues of diversity, inclusion, and social justice in historical and current contexts of the target-language world.
LO 4: Intercultural competence: Majors can demonstrate the capacity to interact appropriately and effectively within diverse social settings and cultural contexts in the target-language world and beyond.
Goal 3: Knowledge, Understanding, and Critical Thinking
LO 5: Knowledge and understanding: Majors can identify and cogently explain the historical significance of principal figures, works, and tendencies in the literature and other forms of cultural production throughout major historical periods of the target-language world.
LO 6: Critical thinking: Majors can critically analyze a text, define a position, and substantiate it using thorough research techniques, the integration of disparate areas of knowledge, and innovative thinking.

Core Curriculum Language Requirement

As part of the Core Curriculum, undergraduate students must demonstrate third-semester competency or higher in another language in addition to English. Students are encouraged to fulfill this requirement during their freshman and sophomore years at USD. There are a number of ways in which this can be done:

1. Completing the third-semester course (201) or a course beyond this level in any of the nine languages offered at USD: Arabic, Chinese, Ancient Greek, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin, and Spanish.

2. Alternate credit:

a. Competency Exam
This exam cannot be taken more than twice per semester. (This exam should not be confused with the Placement Exam; see below.)

b. Transferring Credit from another college or university

Transfer students who have completed 201 at the college level are deemed to have met the requirement, provided that the course is successfully transferred to USD. Those students may continue their language studies with the next course in the sequence.

All USD students must take USD’s Placement Exam and submit a Petition for Transfer of Credit prior to taking a language course elsewhere.

c. Advanced Credit

Sufficiently high scores on the following tests: AP, CLEP, or IB

Languages, Recommended Program of Study

Placement in a Language Program

In order to initiate studies in any of the nine languages offered, whether on campus or elsewhere, students must follow the Placement Policy which can be found at the departmental website at www.sandiego.edu/cas/languages/ under “Requirements and Placement.”

Arabic

Chinese

French

German

(Classical) Greek

Italian

Japanese

Latin

Spanish

Arabic

Randa Jad-Moussa, MEd, Area Director
Modern Standard Arabic introduces students to the form of the language that is understood throughout the Arab world. It promotes a level of literacy which will give students access to the vast heritage of ancient and modern literature, scholarly work, and the media. It is a foundation that will enable advanced students to learn one or more of the dialects that comprise colloquial Arabic (Levantine, Iraqi, Arabian, Egyptian and North African).

The curriculum includes a component which will acquaint students with the geography, political systems, cultures and religious heterogeneity (Muslim, Christian, and Jewish) of the Arab world. Special attention will be given to the 21 Arab countries which are members of the Arab League of Nations.

Lower-Division Courses (ARAB)

ARAB 101 FIRST SEMESTER ARABIC (3)
An introduction to the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing of Modern, Standard Arabic as well as the cultures of Arabic-speaking peoples. At the end of the semester students will have sufficient comprehension to understand utterances about basic survival needs and minimum courtesy and travel requirements in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics. Students will be able to speak, read and write using memorized material and set expressions. This course is open only to those who have never studied Arabic or students placed in this level through the department’s placement process (see website).

ARAB 102 SECOND SEMESTER ARABIC (3)
Continuation of the skills developed in Arabic 101. Increased practice in reading and writing. Acquisition of new vocabulary consolidated through conversation stressing the relationship between language and culture. Students can typically satisfy with ease predictable, simple, personal and accommodation needs and meet courtesy, introduction, and identification requirements; exchange greetings; elicit and provide predictable and skeletal biographical information. Prerequisite: ARAB 101 or equivalent, or placement exam.

ARAB 201 THIRD SEMESTER ARABIC (3)
Further development of language competence to the intermediate level. Introduction of easier literary and cultural readings which will solidify reading skills and provide deeper understanding of Arabic cultures. Emphasis on simple present in two different cases and in negation, past, and future tenses of the Arabic verb; personal object pronouns, noun and verb sentences. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify family members, relatives and social relation; describe professions and college study subjects and specializations; describe concrete places and situations; understand, express, and respond to abstract and information questions; read dialogues and paragraphs; write more articulate sentences and paragraphs. Prerequisite: ARAB 102 or equivalent, or placement exam.

ARAB 202 FOURTH SEMESTER ARABIC (3)
Continued development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Student will be able to satisfy routine social demands and limited work requirements and routine work-related interactions that are limited in scope. Student will be able to handle most normal, high-frequency social conversational situations including extensive, but casual conversations about current events, as well as work, family, and autobiographical information. Prerequisite: ARAB 201 or equivalent, or placement exam.

ARAB 293 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ARABIC (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor, department chair, or the language coordinator.

ARAB 294 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the Lower-Division Level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

Upper-Division Courses (ARAB)

ARAB 394 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the third-year level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

ARAB 493 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ARABIC (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor, department chair, or the language coordinator.

ARAB 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
A program arranged between the advanced student and the instructor to provide intensive study in a particular area of interest. Extensive reading and consultation are required, as well as preparation of reports to be assigned by the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and the department chair.

Chinese

The Chinese language program introduces students to Mandarin, the most-spoken language in the world, as well as to a culture outside of the European sphere. Learning Chinese will benefit the student who wishes to think globally.

The primary objectives of these courses are to enable the student to communicate in Mandarin, the dialect of government and education, and to appreciate Chinese civilization and culture. Collaborative classroom activities assist with the acquisition of the Chinese writing system and verbal and non-verbal communication.

Students may elect to minor in Asian studies, an interdisciplinary program anchored in the History Department or to major in Asian Studies track of the Interdisciplinary Humanities program. Upper-Division Courses will be completed in disciplines such as history, philosophy, political science, and theology and religious studies. These courses are conducted in English. With the prior permission of the respective director, Chinese 294 and 394, may be counted toward the requirements of these programs.

Lower-Division Courses (CHIN)

A passing grade in CHIN 201 satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement.

CHIN 101 FIRST SEMESTER CHINESE (3)
An introduction to the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with an emphasis on oral skills. This course is open only to those who have never studied Chinese or students placed in this level through the department’s placement process (see website).

CHIN 102 SECOND SEMESTER CHINESE (3)
Continuation of the skills developed in CHIN 101. Increased practice in reading and writing. Acquisition of new vocabulary consolidated through conversation stressing the relationship between language and culture. Prerequisite: CHIN 101 or equivalent, or placement exam.

CHIN 201 THIRD SEMESTER CHINESE (3)
Further development of language competence. Practice in oral and written Chinese at the intermediate level, with an emphasis on reading and basic composition. Continued acquisition of new vocabulary consolidated through conversation stressing the relationship between language and culture. Prerequisite: CHIN 102 or equivalent, or placement exam.

CHIN 202 FOURTH SEMESTER CHINESE (3)
Further development of language competence. Practice in oral and written Chinese at the intermediate level, with an emphasis on reading and basic composition. Continued acquisition of new vocabulary consolidated through conversation stressing the relationship between language and culture. Prerequisite: Chinese 201 or equivalent, or placement exam.

CHIN 293 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN CHINESE (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor or the language coordinator.

CHIN 294 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the Lower-Division Level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

Upper-Division Courses (CHIN)

CHIN 394 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the third-year level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

CHIN 493 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN CHINESE (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor, department chair, or the language coordinator.

CHIN 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
A program arranged between the advanced student and the instructor to provide intensive study in a particular area of interest. Extensive reading and consultation are required, as well as preparation of reports to be assigned by the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and the department chair.

French

Michèle Magnin, PhD, AREA DIRECTOR
Sylvie Ndome Ngilla, PhD
Richard Stroik, PhD

The French language is the vehicle for a rich culture and civilization. It is a humanistic, lively, modern language encountered not only in gastronomy, fashion, and travel, but also in industry (from aerospace to biotechnology to electronics), the sciences (from medicine and ecology to micro-biology), business, etc. As one of the official languages of both the United Nations and the European Union, it is a very useful tool in diplomacy and the political arena. French thinkers have traditionally been in the avant-garde of intellectual life, which makes a working knowledge of this language invaluable to scholars in all fields, just as it is indispensable for teachers, translators, writers, and diplomats.
We highly recommend that students take advantage of our semester- or year-long programs in France and/or the third semester French in France summer course (information is available in the Office of International Studies Abroad, Serra Hall, Room 315, or go to www.sandiego.edu/international/study-abroad.

Preparation for the Major

A working knowledge of the fundamentals of French grammar and syntax, correct pronunciation, and ease in oral expression (12 units of lower-division or the equivalent).

The Major

The 24 Upper-Division Units required for the major must include FREN 301 and 303, or their equivalent, and a minimum of three courses at the level of 320 or above. A minimum of 15 Upper-Division Units must be taken on the USD campus. The experience of living and studying in a francophone country is highly recommended.

The Minor

Two options are available:
1. 18 units: at least nine of the 18 units must be in upper-division courses: FREN 301, 302, 303, and 310 are recommended.
2. 12 Upper-Division Units. Prerequisites: Fourth semester competency in French and approval by the department chair.

A minimum of six Upper-Division Units must be taken on the USD campus. The experience of living and studying in a francophone country is most highly recommended.

Lower-Division Courses (FREN)

A passing grade in FREN 201 satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement.

FREN 101 FIRST SEMESTER FRENCH (3)
Introductory course to French life, language, and grammar, with stress upon pronunciation and oral comprehension. This course is open only to those who have never studied French or students placed in this level through the department’s placement process (see website). Every semester.

FREN 102 SECOND SEMESTER FRENCH (3)
Essentials of French grammar together with writing, reading, pronunciation, and comprehension. Prerequisite: FREN 101 or equivalent, or placement exam. Every semester.

FREN 201 THIRD SEMESTER FRENCH (3)
The final course of the core language sequence completes the introduction of the basic structures of the language, with increased emphasis on grammatical exactness to further develop communicative proficiency. At this level students are encouraged to participate in community service-learning and/or cultural activities within the French-speaking community. This course is also offered in the summer in France (see FREN 201 below). Prerequisite: FREN 102 or equivalent, or placement exam. Every semester.

FREN 201 THIRD SEMESTER FRENCH IN FRANCE (3)
Intensive summer course in France conducted by a USD faculty member. See course description above. Direct immersion in French life and culture; students are placed within French families. The university reserves the right to cancel this course if minimum enrollment is not met or for any other reason. Open to all students and prepares equally well for FREN 202. Prerequisite: FREN 102 or equivalent, or placement exam. Every summer.

FREN 202 FOURTH SEMESTER FRENCH (3)
Oral and written practice of French idiomatic expression and syntax. Emphasis on accuracy and fluency reinforced through readings of short stories and essay writing, as well as conversations dealing with contemporary French culture. Prerequisite: FREN 201 or equivalent, or placement exam. Every semester.

FREN 293 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN FRENCH (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor or the language coordinator.

FREN 294 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the Lower-Division Level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

Upper-Division Courses (FREN)

Upon completion of FREN 202, proceed to 300, 301, 302, or 303.

FREN 300 ADVANCED CONVERSATION (3)
Oral practice through debates and discussions of current events or films. Role playing emphasizing cultural content, using experiential methods. Study of basic notions of phonetics when necessary to help with pronunciation, advanced idiomatic forms, specific vocabulary and diverse means or styles of expression in preparation for upper-division work. Prerequisite: FREN 202.

FREN 301 ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION (3)
Advanced written practice and grammar review. Essay topics follow a simulation enriched by literary texts and multimedia activities. Required for all advanced courses beyond FREN 320. Recommended preparation if taking the semester abroad program in Avignon. Prerequisite: FREN 202.

FREN 302 INTRODUCTION TO THE ANALYSIS OF FRENCH LITERARY TEXTS (3)
Introduction to the analysis of texts selected from representative masterpieces of French literature in all genres. Emphasis will be on close reading of texts, with an overview of the historical evolution of literary styles and genres. Prerequisite: FREN 202.

FREN 303 CULTURAL BACKGROUNDS OF FRENCH CIVILIZATION (3)
Survey of the historical, social, cultural, and artistic evolution of French from the Middle Ages to the present. Prerequisite: FREN 202.

FREN 310 FRENCH PHONETICS (3)
An intensive study of French phonemes, diction, and speech and their practical applications in contemporary France. Prerequisite: FREN 301 or higher.

FREN 320 SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE I: MIDDLE AGES TO THE 18TH CENTURY (3)
Introduction to the major works of French literature, in their socio-cultural context, from the birth of the language to the Age of Enlightenment. Prerequisite: FREN 301 or higher.

FREN 321 SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE II: 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES (3)
Introduction to the major works of French literature, in their socio-cultural context, from the end of the 18th century to the second half of the 20th century. Prerequisite: FREN 301 or higher.

FREN 394 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the third-year level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

FREN 403 CONTEMPORARY FRENCH CIVILIZATION (3)
An in-depth study of major facets of the modern way of life in France, with special emphasis on the political, social, and artistic areas. Prerequisite: FREN 301 and 320 or 321, or approval of instructor.

FREN 410 FRENCH THEATER (3)
Study of selected masterpieces of dramatic literature that reflect France’s people and culture, and the evolution of the genre through the ages. Prerequisites: FREN 301, 302, and 320 or 321.

FREN 411 FRENCH PROSE (3)
Study of a variety of French non-fiction and fiction (other than the novel) such as essais, pensées, discours, contes, fabliaux, nouvelles, sermons, etc. This course will examine the richness of French thought and storytelling through the ages. Prerequisites: FREN 301, 302, and 320 or 321.

FREN 412 FRENCH NOVEL (3)
Study of selected novels reflecting the evolution of the novelistic genre through the ages. The course may include major works by such authors as l’Abbé Prévost, Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Zola, Gide, Camus, Colette, Queneau, de Beauvoir, Tournier, Duras, Ernaux, and others. Prerequisites: FREN 301, 302, and 320 or 321.

FREN 413 FRENCH POETRY (3)
Study of French poetry and poetic forms from the Middle Ages to the present. Prerequisites: FREN 301, 302, and 320 or 321.

FREN 414 FRENCH WOMEN WRITERS (3)
Study of representative works of French women writers from Marie de France to contemporary authors in their historical and social milieu. Prerequisites: FREN 301, 302, and 320 or 321. Cross-listed as a gender studies course.

FREN 493 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN FRENCH (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community agency in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor, department chair, or the language coordinator.

FREN 494 TOPICS IN LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at an advanced level of French literature, language, or culture. Topics may include specific authors, periods, or linguistic studies such as: Business French, francophone literature, French stylists, Voltaire, Hugo, etc. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisites: FREN 301, 302, and 320 or 321.

FREN 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
A program arranged between the advanced student and the instructor to provide intensive study in a particular area of interest. Extensive reading and consultation are required, as well as preparation of reports to be assigned by the instructor. Prerequisite: Approval of French faculty member, department chair, and dean.

Recommended Program of Study for the French Major

FREN 101 through 202 courses must be taken in order, one course per semester. Once the 300 level is reached, two courses or more can be taken at the same time, but prerequisites must be observed. When planning a major or minor, advisors will help map out the best course for each student according to previous background, future career goals, or personal interest.

German

Brigitte L. Heimers, PhD, AREA DIRECTOR

In general, an education in German not only encourages students to consider the profound effects of German-speaking thinkers, scientists, and artists on the modern world, but also provides a lens through which the particular contours of the present and past can be evaluated.

Knowledge of the German language and an understanding of the cultures of the countries where German is spoken provide a valuable preparation for many careers and graduate programs. In addition, it opens the door to lifelong cultural enrichment. German is a primary language of scholarship and international communication in a diverse range of academic and scientific fields, including industry and commerce. The lower-division language classes give students the strong base in oral and written skills that will prepare them for a successful period of study abroad, completion of the German minor, or simply give them the fundamental tools for developing conversational fluency. The minor in German is an excellent complement to a number of different disciplines such as art history, business, international relations, mathematics, music, political science, literature, philosophy and religious studies. Upper-Division Courses are aimed at encouraging individual exploration of the country, its culture, its literature, its industry and commerce, while at the same time building and reinforcing language proficiency.

Students who major in either track of Interdisciplinary Humanities with a concentration in German may include upper-division courses conducted in English by departments such as history, philosophy, political science, music, and theology and religious studies toward the major or minor. With prior permission from the director of Interdisciplinary Humanities, upper-division coursework in German may also be included in the European Studies track program. As for the Humanities track program, one or two upper-division German classes will be accepted toward the degree.

Students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of our semester or year-long programs in Freiburg, Germany or Vienna, Austria and/or our third semester German in Europe intensive summer course (information is available at the Office of International Studies Abroad, Serra Hall, Room 315, or go to www.sandiego.edu/international/study-abroad.

The Minor

Two options are available:
1. 18 units: at least 9 of the 18 units must be in upper-division courses.
2. 12 units of upper-division courses. Prerequisites: Fourth semester competency in German and approval by the department chair.

A minimum of six Upper-Division Units must be taken on the USD campus. The experience of living and studying in a German-speaking country is most highly recommended.

Lower-Division Courses (GERM)

A passing grade in GERM 201 satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement.

GERM 101 FIRST SEMESTER GERMAN (3)
Introductory course to German life, language, and essentials of basic grammar with stress upon pronunciation, reading, and oral comprehension. This course is open only to those who have never studied German or students placed in this level through the department’s placement process (see website).

GERM 102 SECOND SEMESTER GERMAN (3)
A continuation on the basis of GERM 101 with emphasis on reading, writing, grammar, pronunciation, and elementary conversation. Prerequisite: GERM 101 or equivalent, or placement exam.

GERM 201 THIRD SEMESTER GERMAN (3)
The final course of the core language sequence completes the introduction of the basic structures of the language, with continuing emphasis on communicative proficiency. At this level students are encouraged to participate in community service-learning and/or cultural activities within the German-speaking community. This course is also offered in the summer in Europe (see below). Prerequisite: GERM 102 or equivalent, or placement exam.

GERM 201 THIRD SEMESTER GERMAN IN EUROPE (3)
Intensive summer course in Germany, Austria, or Switzerland conducted by a USD faculty member. Direct immersion in the life and culture of German-speaking people. See course description above. The university reserves the right to cancel this course if minimum enrollment is not met, or for any other reason. Prerequisite: GERM 102 or equivalent, or placement exam.

GERM 202 FOURTH SEMESTER GERMAN (3)
Oral and written practice of German idiomatic expression and syntax. Emphasis on accuracy and fluency reinforced through readings of short stories and essay writing, as well as conversations dealing with German life and culture. Prerequisite: GERM 201 or equivalent, or placement exam. Every semester.

GERM 230 INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATION (3)
Intensive drill in spoken German based on assigned topics. This course does not count toward the German minor, but does count as elective Lower-Division Units toward graduation. Prerequisite: GERM 201 or 202 or equivalent.

GERM 293 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN GERMAN (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor or the language coordinator.

GERM 294 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the Lower-Division Level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

Upper-Division Courses (GERM)

GERM 301 or equivalent is the prerequisite for all advanced courses.

GERM 301 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (3)
Further development of oral and writing abilities. Continued study of the grammatical structure of German with emphasis on idiomatic expressions and syntax. Reading of modern authors and work through various films in order to consolidate the learning of idiomatic expressions and prepare for literature classes and further studies through interpretation of prose and films as well as techniques for plot and character analysis. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent. Every year.

GERM 302 READINGS IN GERMAN LITERATURE (3)
Assigned readings in modern literature; class reports and essays on literary topics of prose and poetry. Prerequisite: GERM 301 or equivalent.

GERM 303 CULTURAL BACKGROUNDS OF GERMAN CIVILIZATION (3)
Survey of the historical, social, cultural, and artistic evolution of German from the origins to the present. Survey of modern life and geography in Germany. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent.

GERM 304 COMMERCIAL CORRESPONDENCE AND ADVANCED BUSINESS GERMAN (3)
Oral and written Geschäftsdeutsch with special attention to accurate and idiomatic expressions used in economics, business, professional, and technical fields with an insight into Germany’s place in the European Union and the World Market. Extensive practice in writing business letters in the various fields of commerce. In addition, this course provides students with an option to achieve an international skills certificate that is to prepare for the exam of the Diplom Wirtschaftdeutsch für die USA, offered as a cooperative project by the American Association of Teachers of German, the German American Chamber of Commerce, Inc., and the Goethe Institute. Business majors may take GERM 304 in place of GERM 301. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent.

GERM 312 GERMAN LITERATURE FROM 1900 TO THE PRESENT (3)
A survey of German literature from 1900 to the present. Important movements, authors, and works in German literature since the turn of the century. Prerequisite: GERM 301 or equivalent.

GERM 394 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the third-year level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

GERM 493 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN GERMAN (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor, department chair, or the language coordinator.

GERM 494 TOPICS IN GERMAN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at an advanced level of major topics of German literature, such as Medieval authors, Renaissance and Baroque masterworks, masterpieces of the Age of Enlightenment, the period of Storm and Stress, Classic and Romantic, Realism, Naturalism, and Modern works of the 20th century; themes, authors, genres. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. Consult with the instructor or department chair.
Prerequisite: GERM 302 or equivalent.

GERM 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
A program arranged between the advanced student and the instructor to provide intensive study in a particular area of interest. Extensive reading and consultation are required as well as preparation of reports to be assigned by the instructor. A maximum of three units may be applied toward the minor. Prerequisite: Approval of the department chair.

Recommended Program for the German Minor

German 101 through 202 courses must be taken in order, one course per semester. Once the 300-level is reached, two or more courses can be taken at the same time, but prerequisites must be observed. When planning a minor, the Director of German will help map out the best course for each student according to previous background, future career goals, or personal Interest.

Classical Greek

John Fendrick, PhD, AREA DIRECTOR

Courses in classical languages are offered for those students who wish to enrich their knowledge of English vocabulary and grammar and become acquainted with Græco-Roman culture by studying ancient Greek and Latin.

Students who major in Interdisciplinary Humanities with a concentration in Classical Studies will complete their upper-division coursework by taking classes relating to Græco-Roman culture from other departments (such as history, philosophy, political science, and theology and religious studies). These courses are conducted in English.

Lower-Division Courses (GREK)

A passing grade in GREK 201 satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement.

GREK 101 FIRST SEMESTER GREEK (3)
Introduction to Ancient (Attic) Greek. The fundamentals of Ancient Greek morphology, syntax, and vocabulary, with emphasis on the use of the language as it appears in the literature of fifth century Athens and the Bible. Study of English vocabulary derived from Greek. This course is open only to those who have never studied Greek or students placed in this level through the department’s placement process (see website).

GREK 102 SECOND SEMESTER GREEK (3)
A continuation of GREK 101. Further study of morphology and syntax of Ancient (Attic) Greek. Easier readings excerpted from the writings of Aesop and Apollodorus. Extended passages from the New Testament. Prerequisite: GREK 101 or equivalent, or placement exam.

GREK 201 THIRD SEMESTER GREEK (3)
Review and further study of grammar and vocabulary of Ancient (Attic) Greek. Readings taken from the writings of Xenophon, Herodotus, and the Bible. Introduction to the epic poetry of Homer. Prerequisite: GREK 102 or equivalent, or placement exam.

GREK 202 FOURTH SEMESTER GREEK (3)
Introduction to Greek literature and composition. This course introduces the student to a variety of classical, biblical, and early Christian authors through graded readings. In addition, students will learn to write simple Greek prose to strengthen their skill in mastering the complicated inflections and syntax of language. Prerequisite: GREK 201 or equivalent, or placement exam.

GREK 293 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN GREEK (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor or the language coordinator.

GREK 294 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the Lower-Division Level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

Upper-Division Courses (GREK)

GREK 394 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the third-year level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

GREK 493 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN GREEK (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor, department chair, or the language coordinator.

GREK 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
A program arranged between the advanced student and the instructor to provide intensive study in a particular area of interest. Extensive reading and consultation are required, as well as preparation of reports to be assigned by the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and the department chair.

Italian

Loredana Di Martino, PhD, AREA DIRECTOR

From art, literature, music, and cinema, to finance, politics and science, Italy has greatly influenced world culture. The study of Italian culture and its role in the evolution of the Western world since Antiquity is essential for a fuller understanding of the political, economic and cultural forces that continue to shape the Mediterranean, Europe and the world. The Italian Program develops students’ linguistic proficiency while providing them with a strong interdisciplinary knowledge of Italian culture. The lower-division language classes help students develop a basic communicative competency in Italian as well as cultural and intercultural awareness. The interdisciplinary Major in Italian and the Italian Minor explore the breadth of Italian literature, history and culture, while at the same time building and reinforcing language proficiency.

Students who major in Italian Studies may integrate their knowledge of Italian culture with other disciplines by taking upper-division courses in other departments. They can also combine the major in Italian Studies with a second major or a minor in another discipline. In addition, students can take advantage of our study-abroad programs in Italy Information is available at the Office of International Studies Abroad, www.sandiego.edu/international/study-abroad.

Italian Studies Majors can pursue careers in many different fields, including art, business, culinary arts, design, education, fashion, film, international relations, journalism, and many others.

Preparation for the Italian Studies Major

Students must have finished Italian 202 or the equivalent, thereby demonstrating proficiency in oral and written expression. Lower-Division Courses provide the necessary training in the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) as well as basic cultural competency. Upper-Division Courses further develop these skills and bring students to a level of proficiency of Advanced Low to Advanced High on the ACTFL scale. The experience of living and studying in Italy is highly recommended.

Requirements for the Italian Studies Major

24 units (8 courses) of upper-division work of which a minimum of 18 units (6 courses) must be in Italian (ITAL). The remaining 6 units may be either in Italian (ITAL) or interdisciplinary courses taught in English.
A minimum of 18 Upper-Division Units must be taken on the USD campus.

Prerequisites:
Italian 202, or placement into upper division courses by the department’s placement procedure.
Italian Courses (ITAL) Required:
1. ITAL 301
2. ITAL 302
3. One course on the early modern period (ITAL 320, 410, 420, or 394/494 when applicable)
4. One course on the modern or contemporary period (ITAL 321, 403, 411, 412, 413, or 394/494 when applicable)
5. Two elective upper-division Italian courses.

Interdisciplinary Courses

Students can complete all coursework in Italian. However, a maximum of 6 Upper-Division Units (2 courses) may be taken in English from among the courses listed below, their equivalents, or other appropriate courses. In order for an interdisciplinary course to count for the major in Italian Studies, one of the following conditions must be met: 1) the course inherently includes significant content on Italy or Italian topics; or 2) during the course the student completes a project (e.g. research paper, presentation, portfolio, etc.) with a substantial focus on Italy or Italian topics. In either case, all interdisciplinary courses require prior written approval in order to count for the major in Italian Studies (See Approval of Interdisciplinary Coursework application form on website or consult with the Director of Italian).

Interdisciplinary Courses – Double Counting:
The Department of Languages and Literatures will grant credit towards the Italian Studies Major for interdisciplinary courses taken for another major.

Interdisciplinary Courses with Preliminary Approval:
ARTH 334 Art of the Twentieth Century in Europe and the Americas
ARTH 342 Contemporary Architecture
COMM 475 Intercultural Communication
ECON 333 International Economics (Prereq: ECON 102)
FINA 405 International Financial Management (Prereq: FINA 300)
MKTG 305 Global Marketing (Prereq: MKTG 300)
ENGL 310 Dante
HIST 312 Roman Civilization
HIST 321 The Fall of the Roman Empire
HIST 322 Castles and Crusades
HIST 331 Renaissance Europe
HIST 341 World War II
MUS 442 Opera
SOCI 460 Immigration

Other catalog courses and special topics courses may count provided they have significant content on Italy or Italian topics. Consult with the Director of Italian.

Requirements for the Italian Minor

All courses for the Minor must be taken in Italian (ITAL).
A minimum of 6 Upper-Division Units must be taken on the USD campus.

Two options are available:
1. 18 units: at least 9 of the 18 units must be upper-division courses (at the 300 level or higher) in Italian.
2. 12 units of upper-division courses in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 202 or equivalent and approval by the program director.

Italian, Recommended Program of Study

Lower-Division Courses (ITAL)

A passing grade in ITAL 201 satisfies the Core Curriculum language requirement.

ITAL 101 FIRST SEMESTER ITALIAN (3)
Essentials of Italian grammar with emphasis on communicative proficiency and cultural awareness. Development of the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course is open only to those who have never studied Italian or students placed in this level through the department’s placement process (see Website). Every semester.

ITAL 102 SECOND SEMESTER ITALIAN (3)
Same orientation as in ITAL 101. Further development of communicative proficiency and cultural and intercultural awareness for students who have completed Italian 101 or have previous knowledge of the language. Stress on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 (or equivalent) or placement exam. Every semester.

ITAL 201 THIRD SEMESTER ITALIAN (3)
The final course of the core language sequence completes the introduction of the basic structures of the language, with continuing emphasis on communicative proficiency and cultural awareness. At this level students are encouraged to participate in community service-learning and/or cultural activities within the Italian speaking community. This course is also offered in the summer (see below). Prerequisite: ITAL 102 (or equivalent) or placement exam. Every semester.

ITAL 201 THIRD SEMESTER ITALIAN IN ITALY (3)
Intensive summer course in Italy conducted by a USD faculty member. Direct immersion in Italian life and culture. See course description above. The university reserves the right to cancel this course if minimum enrollment is not met, or for any other reason. Prerequisite: ITAL 102 (or equivalent) or placement exam.

ITAL 202 FOURTH SEMESTER ITALIAN (3)
Review and expansion of language structures, as well as practice in reading, composition and conversation. Emphasis on close reading and analysis of authentic texts to prepare students for upper division work. Prerequisite: ITAL 201 (or equivalent) or placement exam. Every semester.

ITAL 230 INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATION (3)
Intensive practice in spoken Italian based on assigned topics. This course does not count toward the Major or the Minor, but does count as elective units toward graduation. Prerequisite: ITAL 201 or 202 (or equivalent).

ITAL 293 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ITALIAN (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor or the language coordinator.

ITAL 294 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the Lower-Division Level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

Upper-Division Courses (ITAL)

ITAL 301 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND GRAMMAR (3)
Focus on the development of reading and writing skills through the analysis of authentic texts and the practice of various modes of written expression, as well as through grammar review and work on syntax. Prerequisite: ITAL 202 (or equivalent).

ITAL 302 ADVANCED CONVERSATION AND CULTURE (3)
Focus on the development of oral proficiency through the study of different aspects of Italian culture. Intensive work on reading, vocabulary building and conversation to achieve fluency and accuracy in oral expression. Prerequisite: ITAL 202 (or equivalent).

ITAL 320 INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE I: FROM THE MIDDLE AGES TO THE 17TH CENTURY (3)
Introduction to the major works of Italian literature, in their socio-cultural context, from the birth of the language to the 17th century. Prerequisite: ITAL 301 or higher, or approval of the instructor.

ITAL 321 INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE II: FROM THE ENLIGHTENMENT TO TODAY (3)
Introduction to the major works of Italian literature, in their socio-cultural context, from the 18th century to present times. Prerequisite: ITAL 301 or higher, or approval of the instructor.

ITAL 403 ITALIAN CULTURE THROUGH FILM (3)
A study of major facets of modern and contemporary Italy through cinema and a variety of written sources. Prerequisite: ITAL 320 or higher, or approval of the instructor.

ITAL 410 STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE ITALY (3)
A study of relevant aspects of the literature, culture and society of Medieval, Humanist and Renaissance Italy through a variety of readings and materials. Prerequisite: ITAL 320 or higher, or approval of the instructor.

ITAL 411 STUDIES IN MODERN ITALIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3)
A study of relevant aspects of the literature, culture and society of 18th and 19th-century Italy through a variety of readings and materials. Particular emphasis is given to the discussion of Italian Risorgimento and the construction and representation of Italian national and cultural identity. ITAL 320 or higher, or approval of the instructor.

ITAL 412 STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3)
A study of relevant aspects of the literature, culture and society of 20th- and 21st-century Italy through a variety of readings and materials. ITAL 320 or higher, or approval of the instructor.

ITAL 413 ITALIAN LITERATURE OF MIGRATION (D) (3)
A study of works by native and non-native Italian writers that deal with the questions of migration, multiculturalism and otherness. Prerequisites: ITAL 320 or higher, or approval of the instructor.

ITAL 420 DANTE AND HIS TIMES (3)
A study of Dante’s Divina Commedia and other selected works in their literary and historical context. Prerequisites: ITAL 320 or higher, or approval of the instructor.

ITAL 493 LANGUAGE TUTORING AND FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ITALIAN (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor, department chair, or the language coordinator.

ITAL 494 TOPICS IN ITALIAN LITERATURE (3)
Study of special topics in Italian literature. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. Prerequisites: ITAL 320 or higher, or approval of the instructor.

ITAL 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
A program arranged between the advanced student and the instructor to provide intensive study in a particular area of interest. Extensive reading and consultation are required, as well as preparation of reports to be assigned by the instructor. A maximum of 3 units may be applied toward the Major or the

Japanese

Hiroko Takagi, MA, AREA DIRECTOR

The Japanese language program introduces students to a totally different way of thinking from that to which speakers of English and European languages are accustomed. Collaborative classroom activities assist with the acquisition of the Japanese writing system, verbal and non-verbal communication, and Japanese culture. The understanding of a language and culture outside of the European sphere will benefit the student who wishes to “think globally.” Proficiency in Japanese language and knowledge of the culture will be a strong asset for people in the 21st century.

Students may elect to minor in Asian Studies, an interdisciplinary program anchored in the Department of History, or to major in Asian Studies track of the Interdisciplinary Humanities program. Upper-Division Courses will be completed in disciplines such as history, philosophy, political science, and theology and religious studies. These courses are conducted in English. With the prior permission of their directors, Japanese 294 and 394, may be counted toward the requirements of both programs.
We strongly encourage students to take advantage of our semester or year-long program in Tokyo, Japan and/or our Japanese Culture and Conversation summer or intersession course. Information is available at the Office of International Studies Abroad, Serra Hall, Room 315, or go to their website.

The Japanese program also has a relationship with the San Diego/Yokohama Sister City League, which provides opportunities to meet visiting students, visit Yokohama and apply for summer internships.

Lower-Division Courses (JAPN)

A passing grade in JAPN 201 satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement.

JAPN 101 FIRST SEMESTER JAPANESE (3)
An introduction to the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing (includes Katakana and Hiragana), with emphasis on oral skills. Supplemental practice with audio-visual materials required. This course is open only to those who have never studied Japanese or students placed in this level through the department’s placement process (see website).

JAPN 102 SECOND SEMESTER JAPANESE (3)
Continuation of JAPN 101. Continued development of basic language skills. Increased practice in reading and writing (Katakana, Hiragana), and introduction of 130 Chinese characters used in context. Relationship between language and culture. Supplemental practice with audio-visual materials required. Prerequisite: JAPN 101 or equivalent, or placement exam.

JAPN 150 JAPANESE CULTURE AND CONVERSATION (3)
A course designed for students who wish to enhance their command of spoken Japanese, including expanding vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and the use of previously acquired grammatical structures. This course is also designed to enable the student to become acquainted with the history, geography, politics, traditional arts, and literature of Japan, in addition to daily customs of Japanese society. This course will be taught in Japan during the summer or winter. The university reserves the right to cancel this course if minimum enrollment is not met, or for any other reason. Students who have earned credit in JAPN 201 and/or 202 are also invited to enroll. Prerequisite: JAPN 102 or equivalent.

JAPN 201 THIRD SEMESTER JAPANESE (3)
Further development of language competence. Practice in oral and written Japanese at the intermediate level, with emphasis on reading and basic composition. Supplemental practice with audio-visual materials required. Prerequisite: JAPN 102 or equivalent, or placement exam.

JAPN 202 FOURTH SEMESTER JAPANESE (3)
Continued practice in oral and written Japanese. Various styles will be introduced to develop greater accuracy and fluency. Use of authentic modern Japanese materials for better appreciation of the culture. Supplemental practice with audio-visual materials required. Prerequisite: JAPN 201 or equivalent, or placement exam.

JAPN 293 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN JAPANESE (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor or the language coordinator.

JAPN 294 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the Lower-Division level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

Upper-Division Courses (JAPN)

JAPN 394 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the third-year level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

JAPN 493 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN JAPANESE (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor, department chair, or the language coordinator.

JAPN 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
A program arranged between the advanced student and the instructor to provide intensive study in a particular area of interest. Extensive reading and consultation are required, as well as preparation of reports to be assigned by the instructor. A maximum of three units may be applied toward the Asian studies minor. Prerequisite: Approval of the department chair.

Latin

John Fendrick, PhD, AREA DIRECTOR
Santiago Rubio-Fernez, PhD

Courses in classical languages are offered for those students who wish to enrich their knowledge of English vocabulary and grammar, and become acquainted with Græco-Roman culture by studying ancient Greek and classical Latin.

Students may major in Interdisciplinary Humanities with a concentration in Classical Studies will complete their upper-division coursework by taking classes relating to Græco-Roman culture from other departments (such as history, philosophy, political science, and theology and religious studies). These courses are conducted in English.

Imperium Romanum (the Roman Empire) once sprawled across Europe, North Africa, and Asia Minor. Centuries after its demise, its linguistic and cultural influences continue to exist. The study of Latin opens windows on a culture that influences our world through the arts and literature as well as fields as diverse as medicine, engineering, law and government, to name a few. Likewise, the study of its contribution to the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of English enhance one’s knowledge of that language.
Up to 18 units of Latin are accepted by the Interdisciplinary Humanities major when students select a concentration in languages and literatures. This would include Latin 101-202 and, with prior permission of the IH program director, Latin 294 and 394.

The Classical Studies minor (Option 1) requires Latin (or Ancient Greek) 101-201 and makes 202 one of the choices from a list of Lower-Division Courses. Latin 394 or 499 would be accepted with prior permission of the program director.

Lower-Division Courses (LATN)

A passing grade in LATN 201 satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement.

LATN 101 FIRST SEMESTER LATIN (3)
Essentials of grammar and sentence structure. Study of culture and history through the reading of simple excerpts from Roman literature. This course is open only to those who have never studied Latin or students placed in this level through the department’s placement process (see website).

LATN 102 SECOND SEMESTER LATIN (3)
A continuation of LATN 101. Translating brief sections of Latin authors and exploring various facets of Roman culture continue as the nucleus of the course. Prerequisite: LATN 101 or equivalent, or placement exam.

LATN 201 THIRD SEMESTER LATIN (3)
Grammar review. A more intense understanding of Roman experience and thought is achieved by analysis and translation of extended passages of Latin literature. Prerequisite: LATN 102 or equivalent, or placement exam.

LATN 202 FOURTH SEMESTER LATIN (3)
Introduction to Latin literature. Designed for those who have completed three semesters of the grammar sequence, this course exposes students to a variety of classical and medieval authors through graded readings. Review of grammar as needed. Emphasis on cultural and historical aspects. Prerequisite: LATN 201 or equivalent, or placement exam.

LATN 293 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN LATIN (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor or the language coordinator.

LATN 294 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the Lower-Division Level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

Upper-Division Courses (LATN)

LATN 394 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the third-year level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the department chair. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

LATN 493 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN LATIN (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor, department chair, or the language coordinator.
LATN 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)

A program arranged between the advanced student and the instructor to provide intensive study in a particular area of interest. Extensive reading and consultation are required, as well as preparation of reports to be assigned by the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and the department chair.

Spanish

Kevin Guerrieri, PhD, AREA DIRECTOR
Kimberly A. Eherenman, PhD
Rebecca Ingram, PhD
Julia Medina, PhD
Alejandro Meter, PhD
Amanda Petersen, PhD
María Cecilia Ruiz, PhD
Leonora Simonovis, PhD
Íñigo Yanguas, PhD

The mission of the Spanish program is the development of students’ communicative proficiency and cultural understanding through the study of the current societies and cultural histories of the Spanish-speaking world. Upon completion of the Spanish major, the student is expected to be highly proficient in the four basic communicative skills; demonstrate the capacity to interact appropriately and effectively within diverse social settings in the Spanish-speaking world; identify and cogently explain the significance of principal figures, works, and trends in the production of literature, film, and other art forms throughout the major historical periods; critically analyze a text, define a position, and substantiate it through research; appreciate and contribute to the level of inclusion and diversity in U.S. society through cultural understanding and linguistic proficiency; and effectively initiate graduate studies and/ or use her or his language skills in professional settings in community development, business, education, or the health professions, among many other fields.

It is highly recommended that students take advantage of USD’s international programs in Buenos Aires and Madrid, among other locations in the Spanish-speaking world. Information is available at the Office of International Studies Abroad, Serra Hall, Room 315, or go to www.sandiego.edu/international/study-abroad.

The Major

The 27 units of upper-division work, which must be selected from Spanish courses numbered 300 or above, must include:

1. SPAN 301
2. SPAN 302
3. SPAN 303
4. SPAN 304
5. One 400-level course in Spanish Peninsular Literature (422, 423, 424, 426, 427, 430, 434, and 494, depending on topic)
6. One 400-level course in Latin American Literature (430, 434, 448, 449, 451, 453, 458, and 494, depending on topic)
7. One 400-level elective course

A minimum of 15 Upper-Division Units must be taken on the USD campus. The experience of living and studying in a Spanish-speaking country is highly recommended. Students should consult with their academic advisor or the director of the Spanish Program regarding the best time to study abroad and which courses are recommended.

The Minor

Two options:

1. 18 units: at least nine of the 18 units must be in upper-division courses (numbered 300 and above).
2. 12 units of upper-division courses (numbered 300 and above). Prerequisites: Fourth semester competency in Spanish.

A minimum of 6 Upper-Division Units must be taken on the USD campus.

Lower-Division Courses (SPAN)

A passing grade in SPAN 201 satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement.

SPAN 101 FIRST SEMESTER SPANISH (3)
The first course in the three-semester core language sequence is an introduction to the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Throughout the sequence, emphasis is placed on the development of communicative proficiency — with a focus on oral practice — and on heightening students’ awareness of cultural contexts. This course is open only to those who have never studied Spanish or students placed in this level through the department’s placement process (see website). Every semester.

SPAN 102 SECOND SEMESTER SPANISH (3)
The second course of the core language sequence introduces new structures and continues the development of cultural awareness, as well as communicative proficiency, in the four basic skills described above. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or equivalent, or placement exam. Every semester.

SPAN 103 FIRST YEAR SPANISH (4)
An accelerated course in which SPAN 101 and SPAN 102 are combined into one semester. This course is designed for a specific profile of student who has already taken Spanish 101 or the equivalent and needs to review the structures and vocabulary presented in that course in addition to completing Spanish 102 as outlined above. Prerequisite: approval of Director of Placement only. Every semester.

SPAN 201 THIRD SEMESTER SPANISH (3)
The final course of the core language sequence completes the introduction of the basic structures of the language, with continuing emphasis on communicative proficiency. At this level students are encouraged to participate in community service-learning and/or cultural activities within the Spanish speaking community. First of two-semester sequence with SPAN 301. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or 103, or equivalent, or placement exam. Every semester.

SPAN 202 FOURTH SEMESTER SPANISH (3)
A review of the structures of the language, as well as practice in composition and conversation, in preparation for upper-division work. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or equivalent, or placement exam. Every semester.

SPAN 293 LANGUAGE TUTORING OR FIELD EXPERIENCE IN SPANISH (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community organization in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor or the language coordinator.

SPAN 294 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the Lower-Division Level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the program director. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

Upper-Division Courses (SPAN)

Both SPAN 301 and 303 are prerequisites for Spanish courses numbered 320 and higher. In addition, either SPAN 302 or 304 is a prerequisite for each 400-level course. (See individual course descriptions.)

SPAN 300 CONVERSATION (3)
A course designed for students who wish to enhance their command of spoken Spanish, including building vocabulary and expanding the use of more advanced grammatical structures. This course does not accept students who already have oral proficiency in the language. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent and approval of program director or instructor.

SPAN 301 GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION (3)
An in-depth study of the grammatical structures of Spanish with emphasis on the fundamentals of various modes of written expression. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent. Every semester.

SPAN 302 CULTURAL HISTORY OF SPAIN (3)
An introduction to the civilizations and cultures of Spain from pre-Roman times to the present. The course is designed to introduce the cultural history of Spain through a wide variety of readings and materials. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent. Every semester.

SPAN 303 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANALYSIS (3)
An introduction to approaches to the analysis of culture, focusing on the cultural production of the Spanish-speaking world. Topics covered include literature, the visual arts, geography, language, and history. The course prepares students for more advanced work (400-level) in Hispanic Studies. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent. Every semester.

SPAN 304 CULTURAL HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA (3)
An introduction to Latin American civilizations and cultures from Pre-Columbian times to the present. The course is designed to introduce the cultural history of Latin America through a wide variety of readings and materials. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent. Every semester.

SPAN 305 SPANISH FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)
The course is designed to enable the student to become acquainted both with the culture of the business world in Spanish-speaking countries and with the language of business as used in these countries. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent.

SPAN 306 SPANISH PHONETICS (3)
A study of the production and description of the sounds of Spanish and their similarities and differences with the English sound system. Attention is given to various aspects of teaching Spanish pronunciation. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or equivalent.

SPAN 307 SPANISH APPLIED LINGUISTICS (3)
An introduction to linguistics and its applications. Students participate in the practical aspects of classroom techniques for the teaching and learning of Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or equivalent.

SPAN 320 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE (3)
A survey of Spanish literature from its origins in the Middle Ages to the present, including representative works and authors from major periods. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 and 303, or equivalents.

SPAN 360 SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
A survey of representative works and authors of Latin American literature from pre-Columbian times to the present. Includes readings in prose, poetry, and drama. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 and 303, or equivalents.

SPAN 394 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study at the third-year level of a special topic in language, literature, or culture. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. If taught in English, this course may not fulfill the Core Curriculum language requirement. Consult with the instructor or the program director. Prerequisite: 202 or approval of the instructor.

SPAN 410 LATIN@ LITERATURES AND CULTURES (3)
In this interdisciplinary course, students are exposed to a wide array of cultural production from the Latin@ and Chican@ communities in the United States. The course may focus on a specific issue, topic, period, genre, or movement. All discussion and written work are in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 and 303, or equivalents.

SPAN 422 STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL SPANISH LITERATURE (3)
Readings from the prose and poetry of the Middle Ages in Spain, from the 10th century to the 15th century. Prerequisites: SPAN 301, 302, and 303, or equivalents.

SPAN 423 STUDIES IN SPANISH LITERATURE OF THE GOLDEN AGE (3)
A study of the masterpieces and authors of Spain’s Golden Age (1500-1700). Readings may include poetry, theater, and the novel. Prerequisites: SPAN 301, 302, and 303, or equivalents.

SPAN 424 DON QUIJOTE DE LA MANCHA (3)
Considered Spain’s greatest contribution to world literature, Cervantes’ Don Quijote is read and analyzed. Includes reading and discussion of appropriate critical commentary. Prerequisites: SPAN 301, 302, and 303, or equivalents.

SPAN 426 SPANISH LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH AND NINETEENTH CENTURIES (3)
Selected representative works of Spain’s foremost dramatists, poets, and prose writers from the Enlightenment to the Generation of 1898. Prerequisites: SPAN 301, 302, and 303, or equivalents.

SPAN 427 TWENTIETH-CENTURY SPANISH LITERATURE (3)
Intensive readings and discussion of selected works by major writers in Spain during the periods spanning the Generation of 1927, the Civil War, dictatorship, and democracy. Prerequisites: SPAN 301, 302, and 303, or equivalents.

SPAN 430 STUDIES IN HISPANIC FILM (3)
A study of major Latin American and/or Spanish films in relation to their cultural, historical, and social contexts. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 and 303, or equivalents.

SPAN 434 THEATER OF EARLY MODERN SPAIN AND SPANISH AMERICA (3)
An introduction to theater in 16th- and 17th-century Spain and Spain’s American colonies. Texts and emphasis will depend on the instructor, but the course is likely to cover popular theater, comedia nueva theater, courtly pageants, liturgical plays, and autos sacramentales, as well as theater as a tool for propaganda. Prerequisites: SPAN 301, 302, and 303, or equivalents.

SPAN 448 LATIN AMERICAN SHORT STORY (3)
A study of the Latin American short story from the beginning of the genre in the 19th century to the present. Prerequisites: SPAN 301, 303 and 304, or equivalents.

SPAN 449 LATIN AMERICAN NOVEL (3)
A study of the novel in Latin America from the 19th century to the “Boom” and beyond. Prerequisites: SPAN 301, 303 and 304, or equivalents.

SPAN 451 LATIN AMERICAN POETRY (3)
A study of the development of Latin American poetry from pre-Columbian times to the present. Prerequisites: SPAN 301, 303 and 304, or equivalents.

SPAN 453 MEXICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3)
A study of major works of prose, poetry, and drama in Mexico in relation to other significant aspects of Mexican culture. Prerequisites: SPAN 301, 303 and 304, or equivalents.

SPAN 458 JEWISH LATIN AMERICA (3)
This is a course on Jewish cultural production in the Americas. An interdisciplinary course that examines migration and exile, otherness, memory, and the Holocaust in literature, film, music and the visual arts, in relation to the intersectionality of ethnicity, religion, class, sexuality, gender and nation. SPAN 301, 303 and 304, or equivalents.

SPAN 493 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN SPANISH (1-3)
Supervised participation in the department’s Tutoring Program or placement in a community agency in which the student’s skills in the target language are developed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor, department chair, or the language coordinator.

SPAN 494 TOPICS IN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, OR CULTURE (3)
Study of special topics in Spanish and/or Latin American literature. When offered, selected subjects will be announced on the MySanDiego portal. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 and 303, or equivalents; and 302 or 304 to be determined according to course topic.

SPAN 499 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
A program arranged between student and instructor to provide intensive study in a particular area of interest. This course is not intended to substitute for regular course offerings. A maximum of three units may be applied to the major, but none to the minor. Prerequisites: SPAN 301 and 303, or equivalents, and approval of the department chair.