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The Social Justice LLC

Preceptorials Linked to the Social Justice LLC 2014-2015

BIOL 190: Introduction to Evolution ENGL 224: Poetic Justice
ENGL 228: Literature of the Caribbean Diaspora ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering
ENVI 104: Natural Disasters ETHN 101D: Introduction to Ethnic Studies
POLS 150: Introduction to Comparative Politics SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology
THTR 111: Theatre and Society  

BIOL 190: Introduction to Evolution

Preceptor: Dr. Sue lowery
Credit: life science core / 3 units

This one-semester foundation course for Biology majors provides an introduction to the mechanisms of inheritance, evolution, and ecology. Three hours of lecture weekly.  No prerequisite.

ENGL 224: Poetic Justice

Preceptor: Dr. Abe stoll
Credit: humanities Core / 3 UNITS

How does literature describe justice? How does it create justice? Is revenge just? Is poetry just? Should it be? From Plato to Quentin Tarantino, with special attention to the Renaissance, we will examine the intersection of literature and the idea of justice.

ENGL 228: Literature of the Caribbean Diaspora

Preceptor: Dr. Atreyee Phukan
Credit: humanities Core / 3 UNITS

This introductory course on world literature focuses on the radical experimentations in story-telling and literary form among ethnic African and Asian writers of the Caribbean diaspora. Our readings will range from myth, the slave narrative, magical realism, to science fiction, with specific attention to the way authors subvert colonialist and eurocentric representations of Caribbean culture, society, and environment. Given the importance of the oral tradition, our examination of the Caribbean aesthetic will include a study of diverse musical genres (i.e. reggae, chutney, calypso) and their role as social critique.

ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

Preceptor: Dr. michael morse
Credit:  elective credit/ 3 units

Introduction to the field of engineering.  Exploration of problem solving in lecture and laboratory projects in different engineering disciplines.  Introduction to engineering software tools.  Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering.  Four hours lecture-recitation-laboratory weekly.  Concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 115 or 150 required.

ENVI 104: Natural Disasters

Preceptor:  Dr. Zhi-Yong Yin
Credit:  physical science Core / 4 units

This course will give students an introduction to the earth and the dynamic natural processes that impact humanity and life in general. Man and nature are becoming increasingly intertwined as the human race continues to proliferate. This course will emphasize the fundamental scientific principles and processes related to natural disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, severe weather, hurricanes, meteorite impacts, and climate change. Historic catastrophes will be emphasized. This course satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement for a physical science course with a laboratory.

ETHN 100D: Introduction to Ethnic Studies

Preceptor:  Dr. May Fu
Credit: social science core / 3 units

This course critically examines the intersecting histories and experiences of racialized groups in the United States. We will investigate the relationship between race, power and equity; learn how conflict, colonialism and citizenship shape the race, class and gender dynamics of communities of color; analyze community formation and cultures of resilience; and examine how the lives and labors of Indigenous peoples and people from Africa, Asia, South America, Europe, the Caribbean, and Pacific Islands continue to shape and confront the U.S. nation-state.

POLS 150: Introduction to Comparative Politics

Preceptor:  Dr. Michael williams
Credit: social science core / 3 units

Are you curious as to why some countries are stable while others seem to suffer from chronic instability? Do you ever wonder why some countries are democratic and others are not? Have you ever wondered why Americans define the notion of justice differently than many European countries? These are considerations that will affect you at some point in your life, and this class provides insight into why politics works differently around the world. As an introductory course, it offers a fundamental overview of the major issues in comparative politics, such as state formation, political regimes, political culture, civil society, political economy, governing institutions, electoral institutions, and other forms of political representation and participation.

SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology

Preceptor: Dr. samuel prieto
Credit: Social Science Core / 3 units

This course critically examines issues of power, difference and inequality, utilizing comparative, historical, global and other critical perspectives.  In an age of widening social polarization, the intersections of power, structure and agency are at the heart of sociological inquiry.  Topics covered include stratification, social change, and struggles for peace and justice as they related to issues of class, race, gender, sexuality and citizenship.  The course will consider these issues in local, regional and global contexts.  This course is open to both majors and non-majors for fulfillment of the core curriculum requirement in the social sciences.  For sociology majors, it also serves as an introductory pathway to the power and inequality in global perspective concentration.

THEA 111: Theatre and Society

Preceptor: Dr. evelyn cruz
Credit: Fine Arts Core / 3 units

This course studies theatre as an art form and examines the historical role of theatre in the world and its significance as a cultural force.  It involves attending plays, designing projects and/or performing. Satisfies the core curriculum Fine Arts requirement.