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The Intersections LLC

Preceptorials Linked to the Intersections LLC 2014-2015

ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics ITAL 194D: Italian Style, American Streets: The Italian American Experience
ENGL 225D: Studies in U.S. Literature: Crimes and Punishments MUSC 120: Fundamentals of Music Theory
ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering SPAN 194D: Narratives of the Mexico-US Border

ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics

Preceptor: Dr. Alan Gin
Credit: Social Science Core / 3 UNITS

An introduction to consumer behavior and the theory of the firm. Topics include the demand behavior of households, the supply behavior of business firms, production and cost, and an introduction to market structure from competition to monopoly. The goal of the course is to develop and use an economic model as a framework for interpreting real world events. Key topics will be illustrated using classroom experiments and simulations. This preceptorial is ideal for students interested in majoring or minoring in Economics, Business Administration, or Accounting.

ENGL 225D: Studies in U.S. Literature: Crimes and Punishments

Preceptor: Dr. Irene williams
Credit: Humanities Core / 3 UNITS

We will be studying Harriet Beecher Stowe’s long mid-nineteenth century novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin; Frederick Douglass’ three autobiographies and his speeches; late-nineteenth century fiction by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman and Frank Norris; Richard Wright’s 1940 novel Native Son; and short fiction by William Faulkner and Flannery O’Connor. Reading and re-reading, writing and re-writing, discussing literature and ideas—this course offers a strenuous and invigorating intellectual workout.

ENGR 101: Introduction to Engineering

Preceptor: Dr. Frank Jacobitz
Credit: Elective credit / 3 UNITS

Introduction to the field of engineering. Exploration of problem solving in lecture and laboratory projects in different engineering disciplines. Introduction to engineering software tools. Intended for majors in engineering or those exploring careers in engineering. Four hours lecture-recitation-laboratory weekly. Concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 115 or 150 required.

ITAL 194D: Italian Style, American Streets: The Italian American Experience

Preceptor: Dr. Loredana Di Martino
Credit: Humanities Core / 3 UNITS

What is the role of Italian culture in America? What does Italianness have to do with it? Italian 194 tackles these questions, familiarizing students with the Italian American experience from the 19th-century diaspora to today. We will examine the cultural heritage of early Italian migrants, the struggle of different generations of Italians to find their place in America, and the process of cultural assimilation that made the Italians into Americans while also leading Americans “to feel” more Italian. We will also explore the place of Italian culture in San Diego’s multi-layered identity. This course is taught in English and has no pre-requisites. It fulfills the Literature and Diversity requirements.

MUSC 120: Fundamentals of Music Theory

Preceptor: Dr. Angela Yeung
Credit: Fine Arts Core / 3 UNITS

Have you listened to a song and wished you could write it down? Have you seen music in notation and wished you could read it quickly and play it on your instrument? If you love music and want to read and write music more fluently, the Fundamentals of Music Theory is for you. The class includes a performance project through its community outreach component.

The Fundamentals of Music Theory course is also a required course for all music majors and minors. Students who are considering to become music majors or minors should enroll in this course.

SPAN 194D: Narratives of the Mexico-US Border

Preceptor: Dr. Amanda Peterson
Credit: Humanities Core / 3 UNITS

What is a border? How does a border shape the lives of those who live near it? This course explores the experience of the border in literary, cultural, and filmic narratives in order to encourages students to critically reflect on the space of the Mexico-US border, a space that is essential for understanding what it means to study in San Diego. Students will read and view stories in written works from various genres and in visual arts and films (in English or with subtitles) from regions surrounding the border, from both northern Mexico and the US. These stories reveal the depth and diversity of the experience of livign on and around the border. Questions of privilege and the social injustices that they cuase will be central for course discussions. This course counts as a Literature or Diversity core requirement and there is a community-service component to this course.